How to properly adjust a standard Remington 700 trigger

This is a discussion on How to properly adjust a standard Remington 700 trigger within the DIY forums, part of the Sniping Related category; SC Disclaimer (Posted by SC): Sniper Central LLC does not advocate adjusting the trigger away from factory specifications and we will and cannot be held ...

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  1. #1
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    How to properly adjust a standard Remington 700 trigger

    SC Disclaimer (Posted by SC): Sniper Central LLC does not advocate adjusting the trigger away from factory specifications and we will and cannot be held liable for any bodily harm, death, property damage or other misfortune that may result from adjusting triggers or other components of a firearm. Firearms can be deadly, use them responsibly.

    Disclaimer: Adjusting a Remington 700 trigger is quite simple. Be careful as too light a trigger pull can be quite dangerous. Do not adjust a 700 trigger so low that it will go off when you do not intend it to. Remember, you do not have as much control with gloves on. After adjusting a trigger, you want to slam the but of the rifle down on the ground several times while c0cked with the safety off (and no round in the chamber) to make sure that the trigger the sear will not release, allowing the pin to fall and set off a round. Most will want a trigger to be three pounds or more for safety.

    Now if you've still decided to tackle adjusting your 700 trigger here is how you do it. Check to make sure the chamber is empty before anything else. You'll want to gather some penetrating oil, an Allen wrench set, precision screwdriver, and Elmer's glue. I also recommend a trigger scale to make things as accurate and safe as possible.

    First thing, remove your barreled action from the stock. Use a 5/32" Allen/hex wrench. Remove the front screw three-fourths of the way. Then remove the rear screw all the way. Make sure you remember that the long screw goes in the tang area, and the short one goes in front of the receiver.

    After the barreled action is out, use a penetrating oil to soak the three trigger screws. If the trigger has never been touched before, there will be a sealant on the screws. Simply scrape it off before applying the oil. Let the oil soak 10 minutes or so. You'll then want to turn the screws in and out three or four times so that you make sure there is no binding.

    You will then want to back out all three trigger screws two or three turns, careful not to back them out so far the springs fall out of place. You simply want to take the tension off the internal springs. You will then work the bolt. Slowly start turning the sear engagement screw, located on the back side of the trigger, in until the sear releases and the firing pin drops. Back it out exactly one half a turn.

    Next, the over-travel will need adjusted. This screw is located on the top front of the trigger above the pull-weight screw. Do not rec0ck the rifle. You will want to turn it inward until you feel resistance. When properly adjusted, the slop will be taken out of the trigger and it will move back and forth very little. Do not over tighten. Though the travel will be reduced, the pull weight will not be able to be adjusted. If not turned in enough, the pull can be adjusted lighter, but it will be very sloppy and unpredictable.

    You are now ready to rec0ck the gun. Use the trigger scale and see how heavy the weight is and if its to your liking. If not you will have to adjust the pull-weight screw, below the over-travel screw. Inward increases the weight and outward lightens it. Trial and error will get it to the point that is to your liking. As soon as its to your liking, you will want to try it approximately 20 times. Work the bolt quickly as if you were going to in the field. This will show you if the sear will accidentally release or not. This could be disastrous. You'll want to make sure the pull-weight is consistent and without slop or excessive over/under-travel. You'll shoot better groups with a 3 lb trigger that is consistent rather than a 1 lb trigger that isn't.

    After you are convinced everything is set where it should be, take the Elmer's glue and put a few drops over the screws. I use Elmer's because it will stop them from creeping out of adjustment over time but will be easy to remove if you so wish to change your weight for a different application later on. Finger nail polish and lock-tight compounds are more difficult to remove, but effective. Allow the glue to dry fifteen minutes.

    You'll then want to put the thing back together. Slide the barreled action back into the stock. Put in the front (short) screw first and turn in half way. Then put in the tang screw and turn in all the way tightly. Then turn the front screw the rest of the way. If you have an HS stock, you'll want to put them in 65 in-lbs. If you have a wooden stock, many have different ideas on how tight to turn them, but that is not a discussion for here and now. After all is tight, check the trigger pull for safety against ADs. I slam the butt stock of the c0cked rifle down on the floor 10 times or so to make sure it won't go off. I managed to set this rifle at 1lb 4oz. This rifle does have an after-market firing pin system with an upgraded c0cking piece which helps with consistency and weight.








    I don't know if you guys want this to be sticky or not, but seems like this question has been asked quite a few times.

    PS: Why is what happens when you turn the bolt in censored? Help here?
    Kamrad Tylov


    "Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It's perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we've learned something from yesterday."

  2. #2
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    nice writeup



  3. #3
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    That would be a good idea to make that a sticky. Good write up hopefully this will help alot of people out here.

  4. #4
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    Thanks guys. You all are too generous. I suppose I should have proof-read and used a little better writing, but I figured us gun nuts aren't here for the entertainment, but for the information.

    I know how upset some people can get about asking questions before searching...and I was hesitant to post this, but I have seen it asked over and over again, and I couldn't find a good guide on here. I ran a search and really couldn't find a good article that explained it within the first 3 or four pages of google. I guess most people afraid to say on their personal pages because of liability. Now if the admins could fix the 'censored' words. I guess here it is for those that may want it.
    Kamrad Tylov


    "Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It's perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we've learned something from yesterday."

  5. #5
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    Is there anyway you could do a write up for the newer remington trigger? I have a problem with mine now that I've backed it out too far. It won't always "reset" the bolt when i push it forward and down. I had to screw the front screw back in to the point where its a very heavy trigger now. Can you tell me what causes this and a remedy to fix it. I guess I should have left it at the factory setting.

  6. #6
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    I don't have a rifle with the new trigger in it yet, but I do indeed have a cousin with one who is wanting a trigger job done. I may be able to borrow it from him to do one and present him back a rifle with a better trigger pull. I'm pretty sure it should be hard to figure out. I do believe I've read that there is only a pull weight screw in it. You may have backed it out too far and the spring fell out of place. When you pushed it back in, it started pushing on the spring's side. If that is the case, your trigger will need disassembled. I'll see what I can figure out.
    Kamrad Tylov


    "Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It's perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we've learned something from yesterday."

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by doubledown1
    Is there anyway you could do a write up for the newer remington trigger? I have a problem with mine now that I've backed it out too far. It won't always "reset" the bolt when i push it forward and down. I had to screw the front screw back in to the point where its a very heavy trigger now. Can you tell me what causes this and a remedy to fix it. I guess I should have left it at the factory setting.
    Take out the X-mark trigger and replace it with one like what's shown here. You can get them for about $60 from Numrich with a safety already attached.

    -matt
    http://www.ordnancesystem.com/
    Ordnance System Designs, Inc.
    Stay tuned for details.

    Be worthy of your freedom and of the sacrifice of those who protect it.

  8. #8
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    First off, great write up!

    In doing my trigger (its about a 4 year old remmy) I wasn't able to follow all the instructions. I dont know if this was my failure in the directions, but I messed around with it for a while.

    I tried to adjust overtravel screw until I felt resistance. When I did this, I was unable to pull the trigger hard enough to get the sear to release. If I allowed a little more overtravel (quite a bit actually) I was able to get a good pull. To lighten the trigger some, my sear engagement is closer to 1/4 turn away from allowing it to release. From there I adjusted the pull weight screw until the pull weight vs. slop was resaonable imo.

    I did all the normal safety tests, I beat against it in every direction. Also, I found another writeup elsewhere which had an additional safety test. If the pull is too light, when the safety is applied then the trigger pulled and released and the safety turned off the gun may fire.

    Anyway, the trigger seems better, but given I couldn't get the over travel quite to my liking, I may be in the market for an aftermarket trigger.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by willyCJ
    I tried to adjust overtravel screw until I felt resistance. When I did this, I was unable to pull the trigger hard enough to get the sear to release.
    First off, thanks for the praise. You'll barely feel the resistance on the over-travel screw. Almost like you'll feel it when it touches. Its quite easy to go too far. You've just kinda gotta balance it between slop and pull-weight like you said. I have found that there is enough variance in 700 triggers that there is no standard pull-weight you can get them down to. The rifle I did the photos on had a trigger that couldn't be adjusted below 3 lbs for some reason no matter what I did. I had another new 700 take-off trigger off of a donor action I put a Basix on. That factory trigger made it down to 1 lb 4 oz.
    Kamrad Tylov


    "Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It's perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we've learned something from yesterday."

  10. #10
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    any possible way we can refresh the pics on this?
    Nothing is certain but death and taxes.

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