Spotting Optics for Mile + Shooting

Spotting Optics for Mile + Shooting

This is a discussion on Spotting Optics for Mile + Shooting within the Optics forums, part of the Sniping Related category; I'm going to attempt a 1 mile shot in a few days, and perhaps 2000yds after that. Not a great feat for some of you, ...

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    Senior Member mckchome's Avatar
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    Spotting Optics for Mile + Shooting

    I'm going to attempt a 1 mile shot in a few days, and perhaps 2000yds after that. Not a great feat for some of you, but for me it will be a "mile"stone. I have the location picked out, an 18" target, etc. A question about optics at that distance: I have a US Optics ER 5-25 on my rifle. Will I be able to spot my own shots at that distance? I have no problem spotting and correcting at 1000-1200, but 1760 seems like a whole other animal. Should I have a spotter or could I do this solo? My dad is willing to spot for me with either my Us Optics Field Spotter (40 power) or his 60 power Swarovski (but no mil reticle), but if a spotter won't be necessary, then I won't put him through it. Thanks in advance.
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    Have your dad stand beside the target and use his cell phone to call the shots to you. Just joking, just joking. I read recently that someone was accidently shot doing exactly this. If not shooting steel, I'd recommend you use a two color target. You can buy high resolution targets or make your own. Place a solid orange or solid black sheet of paper behind your white target paper. When the bullet goes through the target, the hole will be easier to see since it will be outlined in orange or black.

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    Senior Member deadshot2's Avatar
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    How far have you shot so far and spotted your own shots? If you have had difficulty seeing your bullet strikes at your longest range, it only get's worse from there out.

    The advantage of long range, or extra long range ones, is that the bullet's TOF (time of flight) gives you time to move rifle back on target and look for puffs of dirt when you miss. Depending on your bullet's speed, TOF at a mile will be around 3 seconds. Then it's just up to the capability of your optic and ability to see the hits.
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    Senior Member gpark09's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustMe View Post
    Have your dad stand beside the target and use his cell phone to call the shots to you. Just joking, just joking. I read recently that someone was accidently shot doing exactly this. If not shooting steel, I'd recommend you use a two color target. You can buy high resolution targets or make your own. Place a solid orange or solid black sheet of paper behind your white target paper. When the bullet goes through the target, the hole will be easier to see since it will be outlined in orange or black.
    Tried it. It didn't work for me at long distance and it probably would be worse at the extreme long distance OP is trying to hit. Just simply can not see the hole.

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    I know Minnesota is pretty wet and grassy, so if you can't see dust kicking up around your target, you might want to buy one of these cameras.

    http://www.accurateshooter.com/gear-...-video-camera/

    Bullseye Camera Systems - The Ultimate Target Camera, Shooting Camera and Long Range Shooting Camera

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    Quote Originally Posted by gpark09 View Post
    Tried it. It didn't work for me at long distance and it probably would be worse at the extreme long distance OP is trying to hit. Just simply can not see the hole.
    Ya, I figured it would be a long shot seeing a small hole at a mile. No pun intended. I haven't ever shot at that distance since I'm a hunter and not a long distance competitor. Someday, I'd like to try it just to play with the ballistics, etc. I have a couple of rifles that shoot sub half inch, so it's possible for me I guess. I also have some buddies that like to shoot steel and paper at those distances who keep trying to motivate me to shoot with them.

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    Senior Member deadshot2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustMe View Post
    Ya, I figured it would be a long shot seeing a small hole at a mile. No pun intended. I haven't ever shot at that distance since I'm a hunter and not a long distance competitor. Someday, I'd like to try it just to play with the ballistics, etc. I have a couple of rifles that shoot sub half inch, so it's possible for me I guess. I also have some buddies that like to shoot steel and paper at those distances who keep trying to motivate me to shoot with them.
    Like everything else, start at the beginning. Start out at 300, 500, 800 1,000 yards, whatever distances like that you can find and then most of your questions will be answered

    Also, remember that a 1,000 yard rifle probably won't be a one mile or for that matter a two mile rifle. It takes a lot of speed at the muzzle to sent a heavy enough bullet (that has enough inertia) to carry it to those distances you can barely see the target in your scope unless it's the size of a highway billboard. Not recommended however that one use a highway billboard for practice

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    Thanks. I've shot out to 500 yds a few times, but never a mile. I'll definitely increase the distance a little at a time as you suggested. I know that under 500 yds, Coriolis, wind, bullet spin, etc. aren't much of a factor, but past 500 yds, I'll need to compute the ballistics better. First, my buddies and I will have to find somewhere close in FL that you can shoot a mile. They found a 1000 yd range about 70 miles away, but not a 1760 yd range yet. My half a MOA rifle is a 300WM I purchased for Elk hunting.
    Last edited by JustMe; 05-18-2017 at 08:19 PM.

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    Senior Member ddd oo7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deadshot2 View Post
    The advantage of long range, or extra long range ones, is that the bullet's TOF (time of flight) gives you time to move rifle back on target and look for puffs of dirt when you miss.
    If ones form is correct...the scope will never leave the target. If the crosshairs leave the target then something is wrong with the shooting form. I understand the rifle recoils...but if you are holding it right it will recoil straight back and crosshairs will not leave the target. I didn't understand this until this week...but after first hand instruction I experienced this at 100, 528, and 998 yards. No trouble spotting hits at distance when the scope doesn't move off the target.
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    Senior Member mckchome's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deadshot2 View Post
    How far have you shot so far and spotted your own shots? If you have had difficulty seeing your bullet strikes at your longest range, it only get's worse from there out.

    The advantage of long range, or extra long range ones, is that the bullet's TOF (time of flight) gives you time to move rifle back on target and look for puffs of dirt when you miss. Depending on your bullet's speed, TOF at a mile will be around 3 seconds. Then it's just up to the capability of your optic and ability to see the hits.
    Thanks for the response. As you say, the issue is not getting back on target. The scope remains where it should, allowing me to spot shots consistently. My question had more to do with the clarity of the image, and the effectiveness of a x25 power scope at 1800 yards. @ 1200 yards, I have no problems seeing points of impact through dust ups. I was just hoping to get some insights on what to expect optically # 1 mile before I actually head out and do it. I was hoping some feedback would help me determine whether I would need a spotter and what kind of setup he might need, in terms of magnification, etc.
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