Which one should I go with? - Page 2

Which one should I go with?

This is a discussion on Which one should I go with? within the Rifles forums, part of the Sniping Related category; Originally Posted by asymetricwarfare build a bolt ar in 5.56. it is good to about 600yds and has a small enough recoil that it would ...

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  1. #11
    Sponsors Orkan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by asymetricwarfare View Post
    build a bolt ar in 5.56. it is good to about 600yds and has a small enough recoil that it would be good for learning proper technique.
    A bolt AR? What's that?

    Also, you don't learn proper technique with LACK of recoil. Point in fact, it's the opposite way around. Recoil is the only thing that can truly proof your firing position and give you the feedback required to learn.

  2. #12
    Super Moderator NorCalFocus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orkan View Post
    A bolt AR? What's that?

    Also, you don't learn proper technique with LACK of recoil. Point in fact, it's the opposite way around. Recoil is the only thing that can truly proof your firing position and give you the feedback required to learn.
    I was shooting next to this guy at the range one day and he was telling me how much he loved his new muzzle brake. I asked what he was shooting, .223 he says. Guy couldn't shoot a 2 MOA group at 100 yards. Guess when your rifle isn't kicking you in the wrong spot, you think your doing everything right.
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    Hidden Content Originally Posted by sns2 Hidden Content
    I got my gun today. Went to the range. You guys weren't kidding. Even off a rest it seemed to be touching the barrel. What an utter piece of s*** that Hogue stock is.

  3. #13
    Junior Member asymetricwarfare's Avatar
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    If more recoil is what you want to learn proper technique then why is getting a .22 recommended for learning technique? im not trying to argue I've been wondering for a while now this just provides me with the opportunity to ask.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by asymetricwarfare View Post
    If more recoil is what you want to learn proper technique then why is getting a .22 recommended for learning technique? im not trying to argue I've been wondering for a while now this just provides me with the opportunity to ask.
    If you are learning fundamentals such as trigger press, grip position, bolt manipulation, etc... recoil is not required. If you are learning technique such as building a firing position, breathing, or other skillsets... recoil is required. Even when learning fundamentals, recoil must be present to sanity check the technique at some point in the process.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orkan View Post
    Those cartridges will go far sooner than that.
    100%

    With a premium cut-rifled barrel, those STILL would be lucky to see the 1,500 round mark and be able to hold 1 MOA...


    I'm going to do this like a band-aid on a hairy chest...

    Your rifles suck for this game. Sell one, or sell two...and get something that will work for you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Orkan View Post
    If you are learning fundamentals such as trigger press, grip position, bolt manipulation, etc... recoil is not required. If you are learning technique such as building a firing position, breathing, or other skillsets... recoil is required. Even when learning fundamentals, recoil must be present to sanity check the technique at some point in the process.
    Oh, I don't know about that. I mean, target air rifles have virtually no recoil (more than a SCATT, but only a little). Yet when these kids coming off the NCAA teams that have done little else but punch holes in card stock for their teenage years come to me to learn how to shoot a centerfire...

    ..hell, 3/4 of my work is done. By-and-large, they HOLD, and they hold SMALL. They can SEE, and AIM. They can surely TRIGGER well.

    So what fundamentals are you referring to?

    Don't anybody take what I'm saying to mean I think the OTHER 1/4 of the work is not meaningful, because it is very much so. I've yet to see one of them come right off the 10 meter line and execute a clean, smooth mag change (well, except those with a DD214).

    -Nate
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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Csmall788 View Post
    I should probably practice with it in a bench rest scenario. I've always shot it freehand.
    And do NOT do that. In my way of thinking, there are TWO (2) reasons for bench shooting:

    1) Load Development

    2) Benchrest (the sport)

    If it's not one of those two, then you're probably better to learn other ways to get it done. Cross-leg sitting, open-leg sitting supported and unsupported, prone, supine, kneeling, sling prone, sling sitting, supported prone, hawkins prone, offhand, sling offhand, hasty offhand, supported offhand...

    ...and that's without any improvisation for conditions or terrain.

    Here's this: if you can stand on your legs and shoot groups of 3 MOA or better, there starts to not be a lot you CAN'T do with a rifle.

    -Nate
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  7. #17
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    As was said, I would use the Savage because you can rebarrel easily and get either a high quality properly* bedded stock, or a chassis for. Good glass & hardware and you will have a very decently performing long range set up. Reloading will be a must at some point.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Hoback View Post
    I would use the Savage because
    Who are you?

  9. #19
    Senior Member gpark09's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Hoback View Post
    As was said, I would use the Savage because you can rebarrel easily and get either a high quality properly* bedded stock, or a chassis for. Good glass & hardware and you will have a very decently performing long range set up. Reloading will be a must at some point.
    With all that upgrade plan, you sure you still want to go with Savage?

    An opinion is one thing, but bad advice to a beginner is different.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Hoback View Post
    As was said, I would use the Savage because you can rebarrel easily and get either a high quality properly* bedded stock, or a chassis for. Good glass & hardware and you will have a very decently performing long range set up. Reloading will be a must at some point.
    So I just went and read your introduction.

    You have ONE savage rifle, some AR's, some knives, and a handgun... and you're in here recommending other people spend their money on savage rifles?

    Based on WHAT exactly?

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