Reloading Setup & Process (Pics) *Complete*

Reloading Setup & Process (Pics) *Complete*

This is a discussion on Reloading Setup & Process (Pics) *Complete* within the Reloading forums, part of the Sniping Related category; Hello all. I'm heading off to the range now, and when I'm back, I'll have a bunch of brass to reload. I also happen to ...

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Thread: Reloading Setup & Process (Pics) *Complete*

  1. #1
    Senior Member Janvier's Avatar
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    Reloading Setup & Process (Pics) *Complete*

    Hello all. I'm heading off to the range now, and when I'm back, I'll have a bunch of brass to reload. I also happen to have a digital camera. I'm going to take pictures of my reloading setup, and the steps of the process. If you are curious about reloading, you'll see how easy it is. I figure since we don't have something like this on-site yet, and I have too much time on my hands, I might as well do it. Let me know if there is anything you want to see pictures of, or any other comments/suggestions. I'll be back in about 5 hours. I hope this will be good learnin' for me and others.
    Ryback and GJC like this.
    Janvier

    "Research is what I'm doing when I don't know what I'm doing." -Wernher von Braun

  2. #2
    Senior Member Janvier's Avatar
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    Well here we go. I'm loading for .22-250 Remington, and we've got 78 cases to load up.

    This is not an instructional guide; I'm trying only to take pictures of the steps and to give a general idea of how reloading goes for those who maybe aren't sure. And, by the by, I'm a newbie at this myself. If you have any tips for me, let me know .

    This is all the stuff laid out.


    This is everything put away with a nice and tidy workspace.


    Dump the brass in the tumbler and plug 'er in.


    Shake out the media. (Federal's plastic thingies are nice)


    Inspect each case carefully for faults...


    These ones seem alright.


    You can use a paperclip like this to test for imminent case head separations.


    Set your sizing/decapping die... (you can also see the shell holder there)


    (There's the decapping pin)


    ...Lube 'em up... (excuse the tumbler media dust)


    ...And run them through the die.


    Presto, some expended primers and a sized case.


    Looks like we don't need to trim this time...


    But it's as simple as sticking the case in here and turning the crank.


    If you've trimmed, chamfer...


    ...And deburr.


    Lee Primer Pocket Cleaning Tool


    Primer pocket cleaning. (Federal's plastic thingies again)


    All the primer ash.


    I wet clean them at this point to remove the lube, though I know lots of folks just toss them back in the tumbler for a spell. (Once more, my love for the plastic thingies is demonstrated)


    Dried with hairdrier and towel. The woman of your house may prefer use of rags. You could also do the dishes at the same time as your brass for some brownie points...


    And we're ready to load! Make sure the inside is totally dry before moving on. That's all I can fit for today, my light (the sun) is going down. Upcoming is priming, charging, bullet seating, and whatever else.
    Janvier

    "Research is what I'm doing when I don't know what I'm doing." -Wernher von Braun

  3. #3
    Senior Member Slick's Avatar
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    I use a fair ammount of the same equipment thay you're using.. Still, I don't perform any "wet-cleaning" steps with my brass. All my stuff get's rigororusly tumbled.

    That said - I'm in NO way criticizing what works for you. That fact that you do so many of your operation the same way with the same tools tells me that your re-loading method must be on the right track. But then who ever said that I was any kind of expert? We all do what works for us. Results are what counts!
    Politicians and diapers both require frequent changing for the EXACT same reason...

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  5. #4
    Senior Member Janvier's Avatar
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    Yeah, the only reason I wet clean is the tumbler leaves a lot of media dust inside the cases which I'd rather not have there. I do hate the washing & drying process, it takes much longer than I'd like, but I don't know what else to do. I haven't tried corncob media yet, though. Does it leave less dust/residue than the walnut? Or, I still haven't gotten my hands on dryer sheets... do they work for this? Or am I just being too anal about the entire matter?
    Janvier

    "Research is what I'm doing when I don't know what I'm doing." -Wernher von Braun

  6. #5
    Senior Member Slick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janvier
    Or am I just being too anal about the entire matter?
    If that's the case - it's a "personal decision" and I would fully support your reasons for choosing so. Reloading is ALWAYS about "personal choices" - and that's why some folks achieve spectacular results in doing so.

    Just throwing that out there for your (further) consideration...

    Yet I have little doubt that you've discovered a process that works for you.
    Politicians and diapers both require frequent changing for the EXACT same reason...

  7. #6
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    Washing the brass in some way after tumbling, etc makes sense as it would also clear out any of the gunk that might have accumulated on the resizing pin that can be transferred from case to case etc. The very nature of using a media to clean cases will undoubtedly lead to tiny bits & pieces of stuff being left in the case which *could* interfere with the ignition process.

    I 'wash' my 223 brass in general purpose thinners after buffing (I buff each case one by one on a buffing wheel as it has been the only way to get cases back to the very nice & shiny bright colour as like new brass) neck sizing and decapping. I've been using the same cases for about the last 4 - 5 years without problems and I only FL resize when the cases get sticky, etc.

  8. #7
    Senior Member FluffyTheCat's Avatar
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    I love those pictures. The pictures are proof that even you can become a handloader.

    I remember when Mr. Squinty was advising Janvier about getting started.
    I'm so glad that he listened.

    Fluffy
    I'm a genius. And you are not.

  9. #8

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    Can someone give me an example of how much you are going to save if you reload? Let us say instead of going and buying a new box of BH in .308 that would cost me $65.00, how much would I save if I was to reload instead?

    Thanks,
    Longun

  10. #9

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    There are a lot of theories as to savings and reloading. After purchasing the materials and equipment, substantial savings can be made - especially if you load for magnum and oddball calibers. A box of 20 .300 RUM premium rounds, like Hornady or Federal, will cost over $50 a box - $2.50 per bullet. Loading can cut costs by as much as 2/3 ( about 85 cents) sometimes more. There is, however, a substantial amount of cash involved in reloading equipment, and certainly a bit of waste and mistakes will occur to someone first starting out. A Lee Aniversary kit and enough powder, dies, brass, primers and bullets to load 1000 rounds will probably cost you about $400.00 for the first time, but afterwards, you reload the brass, a big part of the cost, and things will get cheaper and better performing - with experience.

    That said, if you shoot less than 500 rounds a year, reloading probably isn't for you.If you are as much of an enthusiast as I am, then it's well worth it. And you can tailor your rounds to your hunting, or long range needs, and make your ammo more accurate for your particular rifle. Try and buy factory ammo with Berger VLD bullets - I have yet to see it.

    Jeff

  11. #10
    Senior Member Janvier's Avatar
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    I would reload even if it didn't save me any money at all. Not only is reloading fun, it gives me extraordinarily accurate ammo to shoot with.

    The rest of the pictures should be up tomorrow evening.
    Janvier

    "Research is what I'm doing when I don't know what I'm doing." -Wernher von Braun

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