Milsurp brass rifle reloading - complete process with photos - Page 2

Milsurp brass rifle reloading - complete process with photos

This is a discussion on Milsurp brass rifle reloading - complete process with photos within the Reloading forums, part of the Sniping Related category; Careful with some of those loads. The Hornady reloading manual has a separate section for the M1, with lower maximum loads. I don't think it ...

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Thread: Milsurp brass rifle reloading - complete process with photos

  1. #11
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    Careful with some of those loads. The Hornady reloading manual has a separate section for the M1, with lower maximum loads. I don't think it is a pressure issue, more of a problem with excessive force and wear on the semi-auto operating parts. Hornady lists max load with a 168gr bullet as 47.2gr IMR4064

  2. #12
    Senior Member JCinPA's Avatar
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    Thank you!

    I was just contemplating buying the Hornady reloading manual the other day. I now use Hornady 200 gr. JHPs for my .45, their Amax bullets for my Savage . . . I may get some Hornady bullets to play with in my AR. I think it is worth getting since I'm fast becoming a primarily Hornady bullet guy.

    I agree, it's not near max pressure -- I got my data from the IMR website. But it may be better to download the Garand.

    I'm betting your Nosler 168 gr BTHPs are not very different from the Sierra Match Kings I am loading. I am going to load the remainder of my brass with 46.0 grains IMR since you've had good luck with it, and see how it shoots.

    Maybe I'll even find my chrony. :roll: Did you chrony yours? What C.O.L. were you using?

  3. #13
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    COAL is 3.250 to tip, 2.680 to ogive

    I don't own a chrony, a situation I need to remedy. The manual puts it in the neighborhood of 2550 fps.

    I used Hornady 168gr BTHP before I switched to the Nosler. Both are great bullets in the Garand. I've noticed no difference in accuracy, but I can get the Noslers a bit cheaper.

    If it stops raining, I'll be taking the Garand out in the next week or so to the 600 yd range and see how the load works past 100yds.

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  5. #14
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    Took the Garand out a few days ago shooting 46.7gr IMR4064 and 168gr Nosler BTHP out to 500 yards. Zeroed at 100 yards with CMP Greek surplus, this load shoots 1 click low at 200 and 300 yards, 2 clicks low at 400, and 3 clicks at 500.

    Very accurate however, I was hitting a 1.5'x3' steel plate at 500 yards consistently once I figured out the drop, off of a front sandbag only. Stock service grade CMP garand.

  6. #15
    Senior Member JCinPA's Avatar
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    Awesome! Ain't the Garand grand?

    I'm sorry, I couldn't help myself. ops: I should be punished.

  7. #16
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    quick question - and you may have good reason buuuuuuuuuuuut;

    why don't you use an ogive measuring tool to accurately measure the seating of the bullet?
    Reloading 101 should tell you that all projectiles - even of the same brand and batch will have different lengths to the tip from the ogive. To accurately measure seating depth to +/- .001" you need an ogive measuring tool and any other type of measuring - such as your example of measuring your bullet length from base to tip with a micrometer is not accurate, hence the acronym CBTO (case base to ogive) measurement that is always read about......

    I reload for a 303-25 (necked down 303 brit to .257 cal - fox, dog, cat, pigging, goat, deer rifle with 85 - 117gr projectiles in various reloading recipes) and because this a redundant calibre I made my own ogive measuring hex nut buy drilling out a m10 nut with a 6.5mm bit (yes I know 6.5mm should be a .264 calibre but standard drill bits are hardly ever that accurate) and then reamed out the hole to the .257" required - perfect.
    My reloads are always within .002" seating depth using my ogive measuring tool

  8. #17
    Senior Member JCinPA's Avatar
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    @ the evsta

    I don't disagree with your post, but loading precision rounds specific to a particular rifle, i.e, sniper type or competition accuracy, was not my objective in this thread. Using an RCBS Precision Mic for knocking shoulders back one or two thousandths and using an ogive measuring tool are covered in other threads, and frankly, not part of "Reloading 101", as you call it. That's for 200 level courses.

    The purpose here was to get someone not familiar with the process started with a minimum of equipment and getting good results quickly. I wanted to cover primer pocket swaging and trimming and get a noob on the road to learning to reloading with good, step-by-step photos and simple instruction, that's all. Again, I'm not disagreeing with your post, per se, but it's not for this particular thread.

    Folks, I've been away a while and I note some of my photos are showing the frog logo. I will try to rehost these elsewhere and make sure all photos are rendering properly.

    Cheers,

    JC

  9. #18
    Senior Member scrmblr1982cj8's Avatar
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    Excellent write up!

  10. #19
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    well done loading primer. I have a couple of variants to suggest for alternatives. BTW, I use a Lee Loadmaster turret press and like Lee equipment also. Several years ago, when components, ammo and arms got scarce, I bought some once-fired NATO brass to try. Through reading forums and talking to vendors at gun shows, I decided to get a stainless steel tumbler to clean brass. It has worked fantastically well. It was a little expensive to start out, but water, a little Dove dish soap and Lemi-shine combo is cheaper than other tumbling media. The old brass comes out shiny and looking better than some virgin factory brass. 'Brass Guy" recommended it, and his stuff looked great. However, I deprime and full-length resize and swage cases before cleaning so the media cleans the primer pockets also. I seldom need to clean primer pockets on fired brass now. I am experimenting with case length trimming before cleaning, as the pins may debur the case necks too. Again, kudos on a nice starter manual.
    Last edited by showdon; 06-23-2017 at 08:44 PM. Reason: Improve clarity

  11. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCinPA View Post
    Thank you!

    I did not try to decap with the resizing die, but I appreciate your observation. Next batch, I'll skip that separate step.

    I would not say you 'should' crimp, reloaders seem to be divided on the topic, and I'm certainly not the expert others are here, I still consider myself to be an 'advanced beginner'. The way I look at it, however, it can't hurt. It may not be necessary, but it should not cause any problems, so I do it.

    I would like to try your load, I could not locate my chrony for my range trip last weekend. :x I loaded 47.0, 47.5, 48.0 and 48.5 grains of IMR-4064 using Sierra Match King 168 gr. BTHPs, Winchester Large Primers, and seated to a C.O.L. of 3.285". The group that looked and felt the best was the 47.5 grain load.

    This was my first attempt loading for the Garand. Mostly I've loaded for my Savage 10FP in .308 and .45 ACP.
    Now, we want to ensure the primers seat properly, because the nature of old military rifles like the M1 are such that there is always the danger of a 'slam fire'. The firing pin in the M1, and the M16 for that matter, are not retained by a spring like they are in bolt rifles or pistols. When the bolt slams home on a new round, the firing pin can run forward and strike the primer a little, and if that happens before the bolt is locked to the breech, this can be a very dangerous thing. So always use hard cup primers like CCI or Winchester (do NOT use Federal Match primers in an M1!), and seat them fully home. To ensure they are seated fully, we need to clean the carbon residue out of the primer pocket. You use a simple device like this which has a head like a flat screwdriver. This is a Lee primer pocket cleaner.

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