worthwhile using a .22 for learning?

worthwhile using a .22 for learning?

This is a discussion on worthwhile using a .22 for learning? within the Rifles forums, part of the Sniping Related category; Hello all, I'm pretty much completely new to the whole marksmanship thing, but I wanted to start training myself, and I have a few options ...

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  1. #1
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    worthwhile using a .22 for learning?

    Hello all, I'm pretty much completely new to the whole marksmanship thing, but I wanted to start training myself, and I have a few options for my starter rifle. My family owns a few firearms, a pair of .22s, a 30-30, and 2 30-06's to be precise. I'm a relatively unwealthy college student at the moment, so buying a new rifle is not an option for me, and I was examining prices for ammunition. the ammunition of the 30-30s was not nearly as plentiful as the other two (and I am not in a sportsman-heavy area). I would love to start out on the 06, but money is tight-ish, and I'm wondering if there is much merit to the idea of starting closer range and learning basic marksmanship on the .22 (with its ridiculously cheap ammunition) before moving up to a heavier rifle.

    feel free to point me in the error of my ways, be nice if it suits your fancy. here to learn and see what I can pick up

    thanks!

  2. #2
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    22 is a great learning tool, perfect for getting lots of trigger time.

  3. #3
    Senior Member ekaphoto's Avatar
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    A 22 is THE BEST for learning and keeping your skills up. Don't even touch a larger caliber until you get good with the .22.
    John

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  5. #4
    Senior Member DaddyX's Avatar
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    look at it this way. you can use the .22 until you get a larger caliber and since you are on the broke side (along with me as well :lol: ) you would be working with the .22 for a while and the longer you work with it the better you will become with basic marksman ship skills which will equate to alot easier time when you move on up. good luck.
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  6. #5
    Senior Member Knightstalker's Avatar
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    I have money to burn on ammo, a big ol' .308 and a few others, membership to a private range and I am considerably older/more practiced that you sound to be.....

    All that considered, I burn over 500 rounds a month through my little .22 Remington Targetmaster! A .22 is the single best tool for you to improve your fundamentals and accuracy and is just what you need for your start.

    That is great that you already have the best tool for you start.

    Congratulations!

  7. #6
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    Follow-up question:

    should I start with iron sights and then move to scope? that was my gut feeling but just wanted to see what those who are more experienced thought

  8. #7
    Super Moderator whbonney26's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by h6x6n
    Follow-up question:

    should I start with iron sights and then move to scope? that was my gut feeling but just wanted to see what those who are more experienced thought

    .22s are great for learning and just shooting for fun. They are cheap to shoot and lots of fun.

    Every man should know how to use iron sights. Get good with irons and then get a scope.
    JOEY

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  9. #8
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    This is just my opinion, but I am glad I started with iron sights, I think I learned to be more adaptable and can switch from irons to scoped with no issues.

    And get out to the longest ranges you can, At 300 yards or so with a 22, you fire the round, put down the rifle, get a cup of coffee, and then listen for the hit :lol:

  10. #9
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    Worthwhile? Preferred over everything but a pellet rifle.

    -Nate
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  11. #10
    Senior Member mr-lama's Avatar
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    What kind of .22lr is it?

    And like they said, a .22lr is incredible for starting out. Shoot it a lot. And like they said, start with irons and switch to a scope.

    And a bit of advice on the scope. I know it's hard when you are tight on money, but get a good one. I started with cheap scopes, and they can be extremely frustrating. So start saving now and get a decent one. (and make sure it either has an adjustable objective or close parallax) You'll have to take my word on this, but you will hate shooting if you have a crappy scope, it will frustrate you to the point of quitting shooting. Get a good one.

    And for god's sake, DO NOT start target practicing with that 30-06 until you get **** good with that .22lr. I made the mistake of starting big. My first rifle was a remington 700 in 300 RUM, and a cheap scope to top it off. 2 scopes to be correct, it tore the first one nearly in half. I developed a major flinch from it. I couldn't shoot for crap for a while. Fortunately, the gun that started it also solved it. :lol: If I flinched shooting that cannon, the scope cut me. So, after shooting it for a while, I learned to stop flinching and it stop hitting me. :lol: But at $70 a box for ammo, that was a hard lesson.

    Point is, do not start with that 06 or you will regret it. Shoot the .22lr a whole lot. Make sure you enjoy the hobby. It wasn't but a few years back that I started, so it's all fresh in my mind. Start cheap, but not so cheap you won't enjoy it. Once you know you are hooked, start playing with the 30-30, and then the 30-06.

    It's an awesome hobby, just make sure you don't start halfway in and make it hard on yourself.

    Follow the simple advice, and you'll love it.

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