TRG 42 338 lapua magnum good beginner sniper rifle? - Page 2

TRG 42 338 lapua magnum good beginner sniper rifle?

This is a discussion on TRG 42 338 lapua magnum good beginner sniper rifle? within the Rifles forums, part of the Sniping Related category; Recoil on a braked TRG 42 isn't bad. It's stout, but noticeably less than, say, my 300 WSM (no brake). I assume when you say ...

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  1. #11

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    Recoil on a braked TRG 42 isn't bad. It's stout, but noticeably less than, say, my 300 WSM (no brake).

    I assume when you say ďbeginner,Ē youíre speaking to being new to long range shooting (i.e., 500+ yds), but not new to shooting. That said, youíre not looking to be talked down from magnum calibers. Youíre past .308 vs .338, and now itís a question of whatís a good tool to build chops over long distances.

    There are probably worse decisions you can make in life than to choose to cut your teeth on a TRG. Itís a helluva stick, and if it turns out it ainít for you, youíll be able to resell it for close to what you paid for it. However, as others have noted, be aware on the front side that it will be frustratingly expensive to shoot as much and as often as youíd like to develop your shooting. Speaking for me (and me only), Iíve owned many rifles in .338 lm, and thatís been the biggest challenge. At some point, it stops being about the shooting. You rein in the flinching, and breathing, relaxing, not jerking the trigger, etc., all become second nature after a while. And whatís really between you and that 700 yd shot is having the right read of your environment and knowing what that read means to the bullet youíre about to send traversing through it.

    Iím certainly no expert. So take this for what itís worth. Iím just a guy going through it now. I shoot on average about 2x/wk and am constantly trying to improve my long range game using the .338 lm round.

    What I notice is that the fatter my log books get, the better my long range shooting gets.

    On the other hand, my 100-200 yd shooting hasnít changed all that much in the last year. Doesnít mean I canít improve upon it (God knows I need to), but it indicates to me that my progress over long distances the last few months is correlated to more than my shooting mechanics.

    Again, just my present experience. I'm certain it's not everyone's.

  2. #12
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    thank u for info

    it dont matter to me if i use magnum or non magnum calibers..i just wish i had these guns in front of me..m24..700p trg 42 etc so i could try them out and see first in how good or bad they are...please everyone keep in mind i havent spent a penny im just looking for the ups and downs wether magnum or non magnum im just trying to get all info i can to make best decision..while i want a try a trg42 im looking at a 700p with leupold glass and so forth so im in the planning phase u could say...so please anyone send advice thank you




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  3. #13

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    Don't hold back??? Okay... how about this... I doubt anyone who is actually in the Army would quote Tom Berenger in that awful movie, nor would they ask if the 338 Lapua was a good beginner sniper rifle. Not meant as a flame, but that's my $ .02

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  5. #14
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    thank you for advice

    well i think ive narrowed my sniper rifle choice to 2
    1. remington 700p .308 with leupold scope with accessories
    2. remington m24 with leupold scope with accessories


    im leaning more towards m24..has good barrel and is pretty durable rifle
    "One shot, one kill"

  6. #15

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    I am a Savage fan so I just thought you may also want to consider a Savage 10FP in .308 with a good quality stock like the McMillan. It's in my oppinion a top shelf rifle that won't break the bank.

  7. #16
    Super Moderator monteboy84's Avatar
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    Re: thank you for advice

    Quote Originally Posted by sniper308
    well i think ive narrowed my sniper rifle choice to 2
    1. remington 700p .308 with leupold scope with accessories
    2. remington m24 with leupold scope with accessories


    im leaning more towards m24..has good barrel and is pretty durable rifle
    Good choices, I may also suggest a FN SPR. They are a good quality rifle and come with a McMillan stock and full-length picatinny rail from the factory. They can be had for around $1300-1500 if you look around I believe. A good set of rings, a quality scope, and a good bipod and you'd have a helluva setup going. Best of luck in your decision!!

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  8. #17
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    I would start with a Remington 700p or700ltr in .308 and go up from there. If you stuck on longer ranges as a goal .308 will get you there.
    "...the states cannot, even laying the constitutional provision in question out of view, prohibit the people from keeping and bearing arms..." U.S. Supreme Court, 1886

  9. #18
    TS2
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    rifle

    Hello,

    if you are serious about long range the Sako is a system that will deliver day in ,, day out ,,

    TS2

    All Gave Some / Some Gave All

  10. #19
    Senior Member taylorism's Avatar
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    My next rifle is going to be a .338 lapua magnum, if I ever finish the one I'm working on now. But I'm no beginner- and I'm still a little woozy at the thought. Mostly woozy at the thought of paying for ammo.

    If I was going to start fresh, as a beginner, but had the knowledge I have now, I'd start with one of the 1/4" cartridges. (In fact that's what I did almost 40 years ago.)

    25-06, .257 rbts, etc.- OR- .243, you get the idea.

    I'd suggest a small caliber to learn the fundamentals without eating a hole in your ammo budget, and maybe developing a flinch. They say with that .243 you have nearly the same range as a .308, if not the same dropping-power. I haven't had the pleasure yet, myself.
    "If you hold a cat by the tail, you learn things you couldn't learn otherwise" -Mark Twain

  11. #20
    Senior Member Shuggerz's Avatar
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    Personally, I think you need to slow down hoss.

    Get yourself a light recoiling weapon, and just take it out and learn how to shoot it. No use in spending great amounts of cash for the rifle, and then having nothing left for glass, rucksack(shooting platform) bi pod, rifle case, ammo.

    I have shoot many rounds through many magnum caliber weapons, and a 338 is not a good beginners round regardless of physique. You will flinch like no other with that round, even with a brake, and if there is someone next to you on the line, I doubt they will like you for very long with the rifle being as loud as it is. TRG, too expensive. Sako, expensive. Good rifles? Oh, absolutely. But, for a beginner weapon, not necessary, and your wallet will thank you later.

    If you want a good beginner rig, a Savage 110 FP, or a Reminton 700P. Both weapons are the Honda Civics of the rifles. They are acceptional out of the box, and modified, they shoot like a house on fire, especially a modified Savage.

    If you want a STELLAR custom built weapon, contact either Mark Lammers or Mike Rescigno. Both of these guys are working on rifles for me, and both are stand up guys who are never too tired, no unwilling to talk. Only two men who will ever take any kind of tool to any of my weapons. (But, let's give Mlammers a break, need to let the guy catch his breath)

    In terms of calibers, well there are a few here. .308 Winchester, 30-06 Springfield, 260 winchester or 6.5x55 Swede. All are great long range calibers and all do very well at distance, especially the 6.5 calibers. ALot of people discount the 30-06 as a tactical caliber, but talk to Lonewolf about his rig, he will tell you all about that, eh Lonewolf??

    So, think this through. No need for a 338 as a beginner cartridge, and it will not develope good marksmanship.
    The two most abundant elements in the world are Hydrogen, and stupidity...

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