Removing Rings - Page 3

Removing Rings

This is a discussion on Removing Rings within the Technical Problems forums, part of the SniperForums.com & SniperCentral.com Related category; I'm glad you got the screws out. I'd follow the above suggestion testing the acetone on the bottom of the rings. I've used blue lock-tite ...

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Thread: Removing Rings

  1. #21
    Senior Member samnev's Avatar
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    I'm glad you got the screws out. I'd follow the above suggestion testing the acetone on the bottom of the rings. I've used blue lock-tite on at least 50 scopes over the years. I only put a small amount on the tip of the screws and never had a problem with it. As others have said get a good torque wrench (Borka) with a quality set of bits, Allen, Slot and Torx for mount or dismounting your scopes. One of the best investment you can make. I never torque my rings with more than 20" lbs.

  2. #22
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    A pipe cleaner ( available at Smoke Shops ) works quite well for swabbing out screw holes.

    Cured Loctite doesn't have to be removed completely ,just brush off the excess.

    It won't relock the threads without reapplication.

    A small soldering iron with replaceable tips is good to have for such problems.

    You can make up a short tip from a bit of Copper wire to fit into the offending screw, and apply heat for a short while.

    The heat will soften the Loctite and then regular tools will work.

    Once cured I don't no of any safe solvents that will effect Loctite.

    Visit Locties' site for a wealth of information on their products and applications.

    Regards,

    Steve
    Last edited by Steven Dzupin; 11-01-2014 at 05:34 AM.

  3. #23
    Senior Member deadshot2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Dzupin View Post
    A pipe cleaner ( available at Smoke Shops ) works quite well for swabbing out screw holes.

    Cured Loctite doesn't have to be removed completely ,just brush off the excess.

    It won't relock the threads without reapplication.

    A small soldering iron with replaceable tips is good to have for such problems.

    You can make up a short tip from a bit of Copper wire to fit into the offending screw, and apply heat for a short while.

    The heat will soften the Loctite and then regular tools will work.

    Once cured I don't no of any safe solvents that will effect Loctite.

    Visit Locties' site for a wealth of information on their products and applications.

    Regards,

    Steve

    Two notes to add to this list. First and foremost is to have the proper tool. If your scope screws have slotted or phillips heads like some older scopes, use a "driver bit" of the proper size and shape, held in a hex driver handle rather than just one of your regular screw drivers from the set of Craftsman screwdrivers one of your kids gave you for Christmas. The bit should fit the screw head tight and be fully inserted in slot or recess.

    Ditto for torx or hex head screws. The Driver Bits in a LARGE handle make it easy to press the bit into the screw head and apply torque without having the usual spring from an "L-Wrench" Also easier to feel what's going on.

    Last, Acetone does a good job of releasing loctite. If possible turn the assembly upside down so you can "pool" a drop of acetone in the few exposed threads of the hole that are usually there. Keep adding acetone as it either soaks in or evaporates. It really helps, especially once the bond is broken with some torque applied.

    Patience and perseverance really help. Impatience will destroy what you're trying to save.

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  5. #24
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    Sometimes it works better to tighten a small amount before you loosen a screw ,nut, bolt etc.

  6. #25
    Senior Member KUSA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by farmboy View Post
    Sometimes it works better to tighten a small amount before you loosen a screw ,nut, bolt etc.
    This is very true as it breaks the bond of corrosion or whatever else is holding the faster.

    Judging from your name you learned this on the farm. There is something about farming that forces common sense and innovative solutions into people.

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by KUSA View Post
    There is something about farming that forces common sense and innovative solutions into people.
    HA! Maybe. That, or it takes "common" sense that doesn't extend quite far enough into the technical, and uses it to sheer and mash off Grade 5 bolts in blind holes where a Grade 8 was really the spec, or use a piece of good drill rod for a hitch-pin when you can't find one fast enough, or throw away all the buckets in the shop because "we're using bulk oil, so we don't need buckets"....

    The other extreme is certainly true. Good ideas abound, sometimes; use old PVC and expandable foam to make an oil dumping station through the wall of the heated shop and into a sealed 350-gallon Kerosene tank that the used-oil buyer can just back the truck up to. Of course the used oil was just drained from the sprayer's motor into an old 30-gallon air-compressor's tank (now with wheels) which has a threaded line off the bottom...close the drain cocks, pressurize the tank with air, and then go dump the oil into the outside tank with nothing more than a turn of the handle.

    It goes both directions, in my experience.

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  8. #27
    Senior Member deadshot2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KUSA View Post
    Judging from your name you learned this on the farm. There is something about farming that forces common sense and innovative solutions into people.
    I too grew up on a farm. One factor that tends to force people into learning how to be self sufficient is "distance". When the "pro" is located in a town 50 miles away, and he charges for all the "drive time". You can have a bill of several hundred dollars before he even touches his tool box and it's all downhill from there.

    Of course there's another factor, "time". When your combine's self leveling unit stops leveling while harvesting wheat, and rain is on the horizon, you learn how to fix it right there in the field. To wait for a repairman -----------

  9. #28
    Senior Member deadshot2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by natdscott View Post
    make an oil dumping station through the wall of the heated shop and into a sealed 350-gallon Kerosene tank that the used-oil buyer can just back the truck up to.
    Some people just went to town and bought a used industrial furnace "Burner Unit" (designed to burn the heavier "bunker type oils). Then used the drain oil to fuel a furnace in the shop made of several 55 gallon drums welded together and then stacked two rows high as a heat exchanger. You could always see when we were working in the shop because of the plume of dark smoke. Sure was warm and never bought a drop of fuel oil. Every couple years we had to weld in a new drum or two close to the burner unit.

  10. #29
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    I totally agree with deadshot2,
    The problem can be solved by using the tip of a soldering gun to apply heat directly to the screw head or if you prefer, more indirectly through the hex wrench body closest to the head. If Loctite has been used often some of it's grip can be loosened by applying a drop of Acetone to the screw socket and also any opening on the bottom ring where it might flow into the threads through capillary action. Acetone evaporates pretty quickly so you might do this several times before going to the "heat". I prefer the soldering gun method to any other that might spread the heat beyond the area I'm working, like the scope body itself. Heat guns can get hot enough to melt paint (which is what I use mine for).
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