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Has anyone checked several different bases to see if the problem lies in the manufacturing of the base and not the gun itself?
 

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Has anyone checked several different bases to see if the problem lies in the manufacturing of the base and not the gun itself?
Can't say. But I do know that I've never seen a set of rings on any rifle, mount, or rail that could not be improvd by a little lapping and epoxy.

What I'm saying is that it doesn't really matter WHERE the problem lies, as long as we make a good repair; lapping and bedding solves all of the above efficiently and permanently.

-Nate
 

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So after reading through this thread I have to ask a question. So if a 2-pc base is used on a receiver that would typically need bedding for a one piece will it cause binding/stress to the optic? I saw where a statement was made about this scenario but did not see a response.
 

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Has anyone checked several different bases to see if the problem lies in the manufacturing of the base and not the gun itself?

Yes, I've test many different bases and have found that Farrell bases and rings is where your accuracy lies. I've tested many bases of the Farrells too and still Farrell kicks butt! They manufactuer their bases and rings so that: Your scope is in the center of the ring which sits over the center of the base, which is mounted on the reciever so that it's centerline is down the center of the bore. Other manufacturers bore a hole in a hunk of junk metal and hope it's in the center, just like their bases. That being said, if the gun manufactuer or your gunsmith drills your holes in your reciever crooked you've kinda got a problem, but Farrells can make you a custom base to fix your messed up reciever holes so that everything is in line again and your not wasting all your windage moa trying to get on target. They go the extra mile to create that extra precision and accuracy.
 

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Scope mount bedding

I have heard about bedding bases, but have not seen anyone actually do it. I have probably mounted around 300 scopes for myself or for others, that included re-mounts and if you are using quality mounts, such as Warne or Talley, which fits the rifle receive to perfection, I personally cannot see the need, nor do the rifles with their accuracy. Still, if it makes you feel more secure about your mounting job, that is all that counts.
I'm with you on this, I think too many guys get way overboard on little things like bedding scope mounts. If you were to put your time into reloading better ammo and more trigger time at the range you'll be so further ahead of the game than bedding your mount, just my humble opinion! And by the way way one piece bases ALWAYS strengthen your action which in turn improves your accuracy!
 

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Yes, I've test many different bases and have found that Farrell bases and rings is where your accuracy lies. I've tested many bases of the Farrells too and still Farrell kicks butt! They manufactuer their bases and rings so that: Your scope is in the center of the ring which sits over the center of the base, which is mounted on the reciever so that it's centerline is down the center of the bore. Other manufacturers bore a hole in a hunk of junk metal and hope it's in the center, just like their bases. That being said, if the gun manufactuer or your gunsmith drills your holes in your reciever crooked you've kinda got a problem, but Farrells can make you a custom base to fix your messed up reciever holes so that everything is in line again and your not wasting all your windage moa trying to get on target. They go the extra mile to create that extra precision and accuracy.
Farrell makes super high quality bases, worth every penny! In a 6" base they have less than 1,000/inch run out from end to end!
 

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I'm with you on this, I think too many guys get way overboard on little things like bedding scope mounts. If you were to put your time into reloading better ammo and more trigger time at the range you'll be so further ahead of the game than bedding your mount, just my humble opinion! And by the way way one piece bases ALWAYS strengthen your action which in turn improves your accuracy!
When you factor in the maybe 3hrs of work time to do this it's really not bad to do it and it well help squeeze all the accuracy you can out of your rifle then hand loading and trigger time will make just that much more of a difference
 

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Farrell makes super high quality bases, worth every penny! In a 6" base they have less than 1,000/inch run out from end to end!
I agree. My Farrell rail showed that my 700p LTR action was a bit out so I bedded the rail and solved my issues quickly. I used Devcon for this and it worked fine. For the release agent I just used Redding case lube wax. To clean the action, rail and all screws, I used acetone.

Interestingly, the documentation that came with my Farrell Rail outlined the bedding process for me so I went with what they advised as far as methods.
 

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Here is a recommendation for a better product to use as a release wax. Do a Google (or whatever) search for:

TR Hi Temp Mold Release Wax 14oz Can

This is an industrial-grade fiberglass mold release wax made specifically for these types of applications. Being that it is designed for the purpose, it builds very quickly. To use it for epoxy release, just apply a heavy coat with the included applicator, and let it set until it dries. Don't get in a hurry, let it dry (no heat or forced-air to try and accelerate drying) until it is covered with a powdery-white coating on the surface. Maybe 1-3 hours depending on temperature and humidity. Once dry, buff to a dull shine with a polishing cloth, basically just removing the white powder off the top, then apply a second coat. Allow to dry and buff again, and I 100% guarantee you nothing will stick to that surface.

You can also run the screw threads, shank, and screw head into the wax and let it dry/buff/recoat as needed to ensure full coverage of ALL the threads. If you do this, even if epoxy gets to the threads you will be able to run the screws out of the newly-formed epoxy threads. Same thing for the internal threads in the action, use a toothpick to apply. Just remember, and I can't stress this enough, you must let the wax DRY NATURALLY between coats, and before applying epoxy.

A can of this stuff can be picked up for about $20. It comes in a high-quality tin that reseals very well if you properly close it. And don't let it sit open any longer than needed to do the job. I have a tin that I have occasionally used and sealed properly that has been sitting in my garage for about 20 years. A tin of this will last a hobbyist for many, many years. It will eventually go bad long before you could use it all. Even a full-time gunsmith would get many years use out of a can. I bet you could bed stocks with it as well.



NOTE: I would include a link to the product, but who knows years from now if it would still be any good. Just copy/paste my description above. This stuff, even down to the painted logo on the can, hasn't changed for at least 30 years. Also note that there are other similar products, as well as products in a spray can. But both my fiberglass guys and I have the best results with this specific product, and one other one that is virtually identical. I can't remember the name of the other one. If I can find it I will edit this post to include it.
 

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Oh, and where is the post noted by others from member S1? I can't find it, and a member search doesn't bring up anything.
This is a 10+ year old thread and it looks like most of these guys are no longer around. I would assume S1's posts were originally in this thread but have been deleted for some reason or another whether by himself or a moderator.
 

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I have been working with Mauser 98 action's. I use a one piece ,Leupold or Redfield . In the rear there always a gap. The cheap way of mounting is use nylon spacer ,no mess of bedding compound. The nylon I use is from a sand pad for a drill motor. The rear of a Mauser is not round and the nylon piece will contour to rear of the action. Torque the nylon piece and then check the gap in the front or you can use a bubble level to check the mount being level.
 
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