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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I am new to reloading. Bought a bunch of Lee stuff. Stickys in this forum were very helpful. Reloaded some 30-06 rounds today.


I used Nosler 168gr BTHP competition bullets. They have load data on their website. I used 57gr of Accurate 4350 (nosler published max and most accurate load) and I set the overall length to 3.32"
30-06 Springfield Load Data ? Nosler

Questions:

Is this a good starting point for an accurate long range target round.

I'm looking to work up 4 rounds.

1) Long range target round (500-800 yards)

2) Whitetail round

3) Varmint round (coyote and smaller animals)

4) Short range target round with reduced recoil

Any suggestions? Can all of these be accomplished with 4350?


The only real surprise I had was static electricity causing the powder to stick to the walls of my plastic lee funnel. I painstakingly made sure every one of the little powder grains made it into the brass case. Any suggestions for this? A metal funnel might be better
 

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Whoa whoa whoa. First, you never start with a max load, NEVER. Max may be fine in one gun, but really dangerous in another. Start with the minimum load and work up to the max charge, while watching for signs of over pressure.

I would make only one target round. Shoot that round and learn it. Build a drop chart for that one round. If 30/06 has to much kick, get a muzzle break.

Then I personally would make one hunting round. I would then make it with a bullet that has the same weight (or really close) as my target round. Will they impact to the same point? No. But they will be close enough for hunting. That way your not having to re-zero your rifle every time you shoot it.

Wipe your powder funnel out with a used dryer sheet. Then make sure your not storing your powder funnel and scale near anything that causes static electricity.
 

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Whoa whoa whoa. First, you never start with a max load, NEVER. Max may be fine in one gun, but really dangerous in another. Start with the minimum load and work up to the max charge, while watching for signs of over pressure.

I would make only one target round. Shoot that round and learn it. Build a drop chart for that one round. If 30/06 has to much kick, get a muzzle break.

Then I personally would make one hunting round. I would then make it with a bullet that has the same weight (or really close) as my target round. Will they impact to the same point? No. But they will be close enough for hunting. That way your not having to re-zero your rifle every time you shoot it.

Wipe your powder funnel out with a used dryer sheet. Then make sure your not storing your powder funnel and scale near anything that causes static electricity.
Agree. Even though Nosler tends to be conservative on their loading data, it is still a good idea to work up to that data. Your #1 and #2 load could and should be the same, powder wise, or very close. I shoot 165 for deer and 168 for target out of my Ruger #1 '06 with the same powder load, 57.5 gr of H4350. 30-06 USED to be the long range standard round and still shoots well, but the recoil can effect some shooters. I have been toying with the idea of a new long range specific gun in an '06. It can do a great job.

Over all length WILL vary from gun to gun to get the best accuracy. Do some research to see how to figure that out. A good learning curve. Knowing what gun you have in a post in general is always a good thing.

Good luck,

Kenny
 

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I use the 30-06 round in only one gun, a modified type 99 Arisaka. I have found that in this gun, for long range (500+ yards) the 190 gr HPBT Sierra works better then the 168. The 168 gr is great for the lighter and slower .308 cartridge, but the 30-06 has enough oomph to push the higher ballistic coefficient 190 gr bullet at the same speed or faster then the .308, offering better long range accuracy. I actually use IMR powders and because of the 26.5" barrel on the Arisaka, I use slow burning powders like 4831 and 7828. Of course, if your rifle has a shorter barrel under 24", you may want to stick with powders like 4064 or H380. Always start at or near the lightest loads and work your way up, watching for any signs of an over pressure condition. Every gun is different. So you'll just have to make several different loads and test them for accuracy. I generally find that a load somewhere near the middle, between the lightest and heaviest load is generally the most accurate round. Never EVER exceed the maximum load of any published load data. Even if these +P type loads work, they are hard on the gun and can cause some dangerous conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You are correct the Nosler data seems conservative. My Lee manual specifys a
58 grains as the max load, so I felt comfortable loading the 57gr Nosler specified as most accurate load. I was very careful to measure exactly 57 gr (not 57.1 or 56.9) and I set the bullet depth right at 3.320"

If this is not safe, I'll pull them apart and re-load. I have a week or two before I'm back at the range.


Gun is a browning a-bolt 3. Shoots 1 moa right now using 150gr soft points
 

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If it were me, I'd pull em apart and make up a batch of test loads. 5 of the min, 5 of the min plus a half grain, and so on till you hit the max.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
This gun actually came stock with a great recoil pad. Much better to shoot than some others.

Can you put a brake on one of these? Curious how much that would cost. I'm sure the barrel needs to be machined.

Not sure how much I am going to modify this gun. It's good for what it is, a light hunting rifle. I have a 4.5-14x mil dot scope on it. Will probably buy something semi-custom down the road. It shoots 1 MOA now with cheap ammo so I have to believe it can do better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Accurate specifies 60.5 gr as max load for the 168gr bullet and their 4350 powder. Think I am safe starting with 57gr charge? Or should I pull some apart and test with a lighter charge first
 

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Here is my load for target shooting:
Hornady 168gr A-max
55gr RL-17
Selier and Bellot LR primers
Once fired off the shelf case
In my Tikka T3 rifle accuracy is sub-moa
Estimated MV is 2835 fps.
Dead on upto 500 yards (max range I have access to)
 

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Before you go any further look up Ladder load test and OCW test. Then decide if you think should redo your loads.

Witt Machine makes clamp on muzzle breaks for about $100. Target shoot with it, pull it off to hunt. They're nice pieces.
 

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Whoa whoa whoa. First, you never start with a max load, NEVER. Max may be fine in one gun, but really dangerous in another. Start with the minimum load and work up to the max charge, while watching for signs of over pressure.
I agree to a point. If one does follow the published load data to the letter, using same components and COAL. in most cases he's not creating anything more dangerous than some factory ammo. I've shot some factory loads that have cratered badly and left primers so flat that they look like they were melted and then poured in the primer pocked.

Those "most accurate" loads published are pretty much "lawyer proof" today.

Yes, it is definitely a good idea to start low and then work up. With a 30-06 and any other large cartridge I'd start about 7-8% low and then increase the charge weight by 1% until approaching the max or excessive pressure signs. With a cartridge as large as the 06, the traditional "10%" lower starting point just wastes components.

For the record, my 30-06 uses a charge weight of 57 gr H4350 under a 168 gr bullet. No pressure and great perfomance. Then again that's MY rifle, not everyone's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks a lot for the replies. I have been lurking for awhile and finally decided to ask some questions.

I'm going to start a bit lower and work up. I read through the OCW website last night and I think i'll follow that method. I need to read more about fine-tuning with bullet seating depth
 

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Thanks a lot for the replies. I have been lurking for awhile and finally decided to ask some questions.

I'm going to start a bit lower and work up. I read through the OCW website last night and I think i'll follow that method. I need to read more about fine-tuning with bullet seating depth

Follow the recommendations on the OCW site and you'll be very happy with the results. Don't worry about seating depth until you've worked up the best charge weight then go to the next step. When you do get to the point where you are going to work with seating depth be aware that often very small changes in length yield best results. All too often shooters will make too large a change in depth and jump right over a length that would have made them go home with a huge smile. Also, measure your changes with a comparator rather than just calipers that measure to the bullet tip. You can have wide variations in bullet length but it''s the distance from the lands to the ogive of the bullet that matter most. The comparator will give you a better sense of how consistent this distance is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So I put one of these at 3.32" into the chamber and closed the bolt. The bolt was slightly more difficult to close and the bullet obviously had scuffs on it around the ogive from some contact with the lands. Should I seat them a bit deeper for my charge development rounds?
 

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Yup.

See how far the bullet was pushed into the case, but a properly sized case will still leave you with some "jam". You want touching the lands, minus .010" or .020" to start your OCW.

Terry
 

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An extremely valuable tool is the Hornady OAL gauge. Gauge is around $30 and you need a special case for each caliber. This allows you to find the COAL for each bullet you wish to use in your rifle so it just touches the lands. Once you know this measurement for each bullet (and write it down in a log), you can then start your various load workups.

Some prefer to start with a jump but I've found that working up powder charge weights with the bullet touching the lands works better for me. This method will allow you to work up a load using a parameter that can show the highest possible pressures your charge weights will achieve. Once you have a "good" charge weight then start reducing the COAL by small increments. I now use .003" increments as measured using a comparator. Don't worry too much about the comparator measurements themselves, just how much the bullet is moved into the case in relation to the previous comparator measurement.

Once I've found a good charge weight with bullet touching the lands, I just load up a bunch of cartridges with this charge and COAL then take along my hand press with seating die. Shoot several rounds, shorten a few, shoot, evaluate, shorten another batch, shoot, etc. When I reach the best possible accuracy I then just reseat the rest of the loads to that depth and shoot away.
 

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So I am new to reloading. Bought a bunch of Lee stuff. Stickys in this forum were very helpful. Reloaded some 30-06 rounds today.


I used Nosler 168gr BTHP competition bullets. They have load data on their website. I used 57gr of Accurate 4350 (nosler published max and most accurate load) and I set the overall length to 3.32"
30-06 Springfield Load Data ? Nosler

Questions:

Is this a good starting point for an accurate long range target round.

I'm looking to work up 4 rounds.

1) Long range target round (500-800 yards)

2) Whitetail round

3) Varmint round (coyote and smaller animals)

4) Short range target round with reduced recoil

Any suggestions? Can all of these be accomplished with 4350?


The only real surprise I had was static electricity causing the powder to stick to the walls of my plastic lee funnel. I painstakingly made sure every one of the little powder grains made it into the brass case. Any suggestions for this? A metal funnel might be better
I am pretty new to reloading. However, my goal is not to create the fastest round on the planet it is to create a bullet that will give me the best accuracy in my rifle. I look at the lowest load for my powder and bullet. Then i start at the lowest. I go one grain difference so i use IMr 4064 and i start at minimum of 45 is what my book showed. I loaded 45 46 47 grains knowing my max was 51.9. In my case 45 grains hit it out of the park 46 was close and 47 sucked. Therefore for this powder and my 168 gr bulllets i am sticking with 45 for now. I may experiment a little more in months to come for now that is good.

i have a cheap savage axis and i put a boyds stock on it because it wasnt very accurate. The 45 gr in that rifle are tight. like 1/2 3/4 moa for cheap rifle. You need to find the one that works for your weapon.
 
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