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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Remington is a better choice than browning. $1100 can get an alright rifle, with $1500-2000 doing better. That $1100 rifle will need a trigger and a bed job to start getting right. Buying on the used market can have great benefits, as the right semi-custom 6.5CM can be had for darn near half price.

$300 isn't even beginning to get a decent optic. $800-$1000 would be closer, and those are considered "budget" low end scopes. A few in the $400-600 range can be workable for an entry level setup... but its a precarious price point. Might need to go through 3 to find a good one.

Support kit I was referring to was mainly things like a kestrel, a LRF, ballistic app for your phone, bipod, rear bag, stock pack, sling, databook(and supplies), etc, etc.

If you are going to go for a factory remington rifle, then I'd get a 243win or 260rem. (if you can find a 260) Getting a semi-custom that someone rebarreled in 6.5CM or 260rem would be a better choice. (with my preference going to the 6.5CM) Factory ammo is readily available for the .243win and 260, and those can be had in factory rifles. 6.5CM has an abundance of factory ammo that shoots and kills quite well, but you'll be hard pressed to find a factory rifle chambered in it.
Thanks for your opinion, it really helps. I like the idea of used guns however I am just a little leery about where they have been, etc. could you suggest a good beginning scope for $400-600?
I will build up a support kit as well, pick a good bipod, stock accesories, etc. This is a very important thing, I will set-up a "bug-out" bag with supplies and what not as my support bag.

Would you go with a Leupold scope? I think those are decent scopes. What magnification would you suggest?
 

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Is this a good scope to consider?
Nikon PROSTAFF 5 Riflescopes : Cabela's
I think I'd choose 3.5x-14x if that's good...
Before you buy a scope, research what is important to you. First Focal Plane vs Second Focal Plane if you are not using fixed. The BDC and what its calibration is. The reticle you want. The size of the objective. Can the scope handle the caliber you have chosen. Parallax. Clarity. Mounting options. Sight Nikon is not a bad company. However you need to determine what you want in a scope, and then find a scope that can fit those needs. You weapon can even determine what kind of eye relief you get. For a .22 not much is necessary, but if you only have 2 inches of eye relief on a .308 it can become a painful learning experience.

The most important thing to do first, is to make an informed decision on a rifle. Then work from there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Thanks for the article link. I looked at it and now I can honestly say that there's a lot to learn about this. I will read through most of them and learn. I am set on the remington 700. I have been looking at different optics and mounting systems as well. I will need a bore-sighter and all of that as well.
 

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Funny, I have a Leupold VX-3 now and was Considering a Vortex PST FFP for my next scope.
Read Nate's sticky thread in the rifles section on modifications that improve accuracy.

Trigger time is the most important.
I chose to go with a 22 to build skills to a certain level before putting money into a rifle build.
I have my donor action that will be stripped and sent out to be trued and re barreled this Spring.

I'm Probably going to turn the 270 Winchester into a 280 Remington to use 7 mm bullets in the longer case. Still up in the air on that. There are some newer 270 VLD bullets to use in a tighter twist barrel.

The important thing is I feel that after over 10000 rounds, 2 cases, of practice my shots will go where I want them to. In centerfire that would be more than the cost of the gun and scope combined and would burn out a barrel.
I'm playing catch up since I took about 3 decades off from shooting. I dry fire when I am inside on rainy days or at night.

Spending lots of money and not getting immediate results can be discouraging.
Good equipment is necessary but so is the time practicing.

Skills have to be developed.
It is a fun journey as you reach new levels and can look back at where you started.

Enjoy your journey.

Tom
 

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Hypno, why not 280AI? Little better case design and you can buy lapua brass.

My buddy did this, and is glad, he actually regrets not doing an at with his 06, then just necking up the 280 brass.

I also second the 22lr idea, or even a good bolt 223, which if you reloading is really cheap. And can be pushed hard.
 

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Was thinking resale to stay with 270.
280 for bullet selection, AI hadn't crossed my mind till you mentioned it.
Just wanted to stay away from Magnums and have a bullet with better BC than a .308.

Might was well get all I can out of the action without going to a Magnum case and bolt face.
Going to read up some more on the AI.

270 is so off the shelf ammo can be used in a tight spot and most hunters around me do not reload. If they can't buy ammo at Wal Mart then the gun sits on the gun rack at an independent dealer. The Remington 700 Mountain rifle Stainless 7mm-08 is still sitting at a pawn shop 18 months later. After tax season I might offer them $300 for it. They dropped it to $400.
Looks barely used. Something like that would be perfect for the OP to pick up to learn on. Thin barrel profile though. Shoot 2 then cool off.
 

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Wow, where do you live? That would be worth a drive. Haha.

Nosler sells brass and makes ammo for the 280AI.

It's not the cheapest but you get am extra couple of FPS.
 

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I do not like the idea of hunting elk at 1000 yards. Even when there is an expert shooter who has extensive training and knowledge of ballistics the slightest little un-corrected wind can shift your point of impact significantly and the animal can be wounded. Did you know that the barometric pressure will affect your trajectory and will also change the amount of force that the wind has against your bullet?

The issue is that at 1000 yards is so far that it can take a very long time for you to get over there after making the shot and you will have an extremely hard time finding the animal. I know someone who shot a sheep from 1100 yards. The shot was from one hillside over to another one. He couldn't get over there until the next day. He thinks he is a sharp shooter but he just literally lobs shots towards the animal until one happens to hit it. Unfortunately I've even heard a gun store owner who advocates this type of hunting and he sells piles of huskemaw scopes to people that think you can just "dial and shoot".

Before buying a rifle and scope you will want to do TONS of learning about long range shooting or you will likely end up having to re-buy after you learn what you really need. I think the Sniper 101 series on You Tube is an excellent place to start. Also don't discount the 7mm cartridges, you may be surprised to find that at long range they can out perform the two cartridges you are looking at. The Sniper 101 series will get into that topic during the cartridge selection video. If I were to want a 338 I would skip the 338WM and head straight to the 338 RUM or 338 Lapua. The 338WM doesn't provide enough advantage in my opinion vs a 7RM or 300WM to justify it's drawbacks.

And have fun, long range shooting is a blast.
 

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Leave your ego out of this please. No one said you "weren't good at shooting." The questions you are asking, in the way you're asking them, is like me trying to tell a fighter pilot that I know how to fly because I grabbed the stick on a cesna once. If you know so much, why are you asking the ultimate rookie questions? You are trying to get started on a path that some of us started on decades ago. Why ask questions and then get defensive when you don't like the answers?

I agree with Doc... take a breath. Slow down. No one here is trying to hurt you. We are trying to get you to see the forest from the trees. You can either listen to us, or keep doing your own thing. Ask for help, and slap our hand when we reach out. At some point you'll undoubtedly end up right where we're having you start. Doing it our way early on will save you a lot of time/stress/grief/money. If I could hook a cord up to your brain, and dump in my life's experiences, it would be fast and easy. Sadly I don't know how to do that. So just slow down and realize that it will take years for you to wring out your potential as a rifle shooter. There is so much to learn that you could spend every day for the rest of your life trying to understand it all, and not get it done.

So, assuming you're going to slow up, lets begin anew. We know you want to shoot deer, and we know you don't have the experience to be shooting them very far. The rest really comes down to money. OLD POST I KNOW, BUT MAYBE THIS WILL HELP SOMEONE ELSE.

What is your budget for a rifle?
Budget for optics?
Budget for support kit?
Budget for ammo?
Budget for entire reloading setup?

If you want us to give serious advice, then show us why we should take you seriously? A lot of people go looking for the "best thing to buy" and about 10% of them are even serious about anything they are doing, and just waste people's time. We can help you, if you are serious about getting help, and are willing to learn. Lots of talent here.
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The one thing I learned the hard way was underestimating my budget for a very good optic. Once you decide on a caliber, IMO, that's the most important factor in determining your success in being able to accurately and consistently hit what you're aiming at, besides a flat shooting, fast caliber, i.e. 7MM Mag, etc. It's good for just about any North American game, from W.T. Deer on up. My research has consistently led me to optics that run in the $1,000-$1,200 range. I wish someone told me to expect that when researching optics. It would've really helped a lot and narrowed the field considerably. Take a look at: OpticsPlanet.com | Low Prices, Free S&H on Binoculars, Sunglasses, Night Vision Goggles, Riflescopes, Flashlights, Rangefinders - Hunting, Outdoor, Science & Military They have a great selection and some of the best prices.
 

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2000 yards is quite a far piece, about 1.25 miles. To my knowledge, only the very best trained and skilled hunters are able to hit the "vitals" area on an animal at that range. The guns typically used for those ranges, both target and more importantly hunting for a clean kill are more like a .338 Lapua, not so much the .338 Win Mag. The rifles that are able to hit that size target consistently run in the $6K-$8k range, the scope upwards of $2K, plus the ancillary equipment: top notch spotting scopes, range finders that will reach out that far etc., and typically a second person is used to give you the "shooting solution", while you're setting up the rifle and scope to his instructions. I don't think this can be done for the budget I think you have in mind, not to be overly critical, just realistic. This is a company that specializes in what you want and they offer a training school to go along with what their rifles are capable of. You'll need training and the money to practice. That's a fact for 2K yard shots. https://www.gunwerks.com/ and https://www.gunwerks.com/store/rifles/verdict#98-43-68-25-62-52-66-55-117-127. Look around on their site and you'll get a realistic idea of what's required to be able to successfully make the kind of shots you are talking about. G.L. my friend!
 

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No matter how good I will get, I will never shoot an animal at 2K. That seems to be ego dring selfish act at to me.

Too many factors are playing at that distance.
 

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If you read through the thread that is 2 years old, you would see the OP never said anything about shooting an animal at 2000 yards.

He first mentioned 1200, then 1000.

Though there's really no reason we should be posting in a thread that was last active 2 years ago.
 

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Hello everyone!
Haven't been on the forums in a while but I'm about to buy a new rifle. I have already eliminated the 7mm, .300 RUM, .300 WSM, and the .338 Lapua. I can not decided between these two calibers and I have research all I can on them but I figured I should ask here. So, I am buying this gun from cabelas.
Here are my picks for a .338 WM:
- Remington® 700 North American Custom Rifles : Cabela's

- Browning® X-Bolt Stainless Stalker Bolt-Action Rifle : Cabela's

Here is my pick for a .300 Win mag:
- Remington® Model 700™ Long-Range Bolt-Action Rifles : Cabela's

I know that the .300 WM has a lighter bullet and the .338 WM has a more of a flat-shooting gun at long ranges. I mostly deer hunt but I am going to start elk hunting and bigger game hunting. I will also be doing some extreme long range shooting, maybe 1,500-2,000 yards. Yes I know it's crazy but that's what I want to do with a new gun. So what are all of your opinions? What gun will benefit me the most in the long run? I already know that ammo is harder to find for the .338's so that is one con about it. Is the .338 Win Mag more accurate at longer ranges? I will be buying factory ammo for now, I can't really afford reloading equipment at this time. Thanks in advance!

- DeerHunter16
 
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