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Won't know until you shoot one. I'd recommend pulling and starting over. From the way you wrote this, I'm guessing you are new to reloading. So you probably didn't do any load development, which could be very dangerous because you don't know the limits of that specific rifle.

Pull and start over is the safest route but you can be experimental is you want. Just take a video if you go that route.
 

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Yeah it might blow up your gun and rip half of your face off, or maybe splatter your fingers all over the ground. But you could easily pull those bullets and work your way up from a conservative load.
I dont really want to see the video...
 

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Without knowing a ton of information about your rifle, past load development with that rifle and so on, it is impossible for anyone to provide a safe and accurate answer to your question. Even then, they would just be betting with your face as chips.
Chalk it up to a learning experience and pull the bullets.
 

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Without knowing a ton of information about your rifle, past load development with that rifle and so on, it is impossible for anyone to provide a safe and accurate answer to your question. Even then, they would just be betting with your face as chips.
Chalk it up to a learning experience and pull the bullets.
I took all you guys advise. I pulled them and started over. I’ll let someone else find out and post his/her/lgbtqu/septicon/influencer (did I cover everyone?) of the video
 

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Well when I do a load development, I do a pressure test. I start at the published minimum load suggested by a reputable source and loan one round going up a 1/4 or 1/2 grain depending on the round. I will load a little past the max recommended just to see where things end up. When I go to the range, after each round I fire, I inspect the spent case after each shot. I look for pressure signs, like primer cratering, or shinny areas on the base, etc. Once I start seeing pressure signs, I stop the test and make note of the max for that weapon. I use my puller to recover the powder and projectile from the un-fired cases beyond the max powder amount I discovered thru the process. I do this not so much to recycle the recovered components as much as I prefer not to have loaded rounds beyond the pressure max lying around. I keep an index card with my boxes of 50 cases to track various load info regarding those cases including the weapon this box is dedicated to, max powder to be used, how many times these rounds were reloaded and the recipe used for each iteration of loads.

If you are new to loading, it is a good idea to err on the side of caution until you get familiar with different powders by doing pressure tests with them and comparing your results with a powder and the published max info.

That's my .02
 
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