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Discussion Starter #1
In many ways I am more concerned about fire than about theft. Being in a rural setting fire response can be pretty slow and on more than one occasion a home has burned down without neighbors nor fire department even being aware of it until someone noticed the remains of the home a few days later:(.

I have some thoughts/questions about doing some make-shift work to extend the real world fire resistance of my safes and security cabinets.

Where applicable add wood stove door gaskets to the door seams https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias=aps&field-keywords=Wood+Stove+door+gasket

Where possible, add a layer or two of drywall and or concrete fiberboard to the inside walls/doors/floor/ceiling

My last and perhaps a bit crazy idea is to build up fire resistance on the outside of the safe/cabinet. I was thinking about building up a few layers of drywall/concrete fiber board and/or wood stove insulation https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=Wood+Stove+Insulation+blanket&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3AWood+Stove+Insulation+blanket

In particular I am interested in your thoughts about this last idea.
 

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Intumescent paint. It's expensive, but is designed for use on the metal. It's used on structural metal in buildings to slow the fire. Once it comes in contact with fire, it expands and grows so the fire has more material to burn through. It's not fire proof, but is fire redartaint. It will give your safe another 30-40 minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks! Wow there are a number of products out there, but this tech looks pretty cool! I'll have to look into it. I appreciate your feedback on these threads. It is also nice to see a username I recognize from Cal-Guns... even if you did defect and move to a free state! :)
 

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Well the paint I know about because that's what I do for a living.

You too can defect. AZ is a fantastic place.
 

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Why not a "two-fer".

Find a old freezer that has inside dimensions that will allow your safe to fit inside. OK, not possible for some safes but many will. Gut the freezer, cutting the bottom out so the safe can still be bolted to a concrete slab. Put the remaining part of the freezer around the safe and pack any remaining space with rock wool (attic insulation).

Not only will the freezer add insulation and fire resistance to the safe, it will camouflage the safe from burglars.
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Another option is to enclose the safe in a cinder block enclosure with actual fire door on the opening. Dry stack the blocks, stick pieces of #5 Rebar down the voids and then fill with grout. Pour a concrete slab across the top. Again, not only fire resistance but additional security for the safe. If located in a rural area not only are fire depts slow to respond but burglars can break in and even if there is an alarm, how long before the law arrives? I used to live in an area where half a day was not an unreasonable response time.
 

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Deadshot is pointing you in the right direction. You need Rocksull or Rockwool insulation as a barrier between what you want to protect and the fire. A safe, usually being made of metal will conduct and transfer heat to anything on the inside and wont give any natural fire rating. Metal does not give any fire separation rating!
Usually you will need framing of at least 3 1/2", rocksull insulation filling the spaces in between framing, and 2 layers of 5/8" fire rated drywall. All joints need to be taped and joints at the floor/ceiling or walls will have to be fire caulked Hilti FS ONE or product like that. That will typically give you a 2hr fire rating. Concrete also is a poor fire protection barrier unless poured thick enough (200-300mm) to provide protection. Concrete does catch on fire and burn believe it or not!
Drywall, fire rated doors, and a proper fire stop system is the best way to ensure you are protecting your valuables. It is ultimately up to you on what you want the finished product to look like. I would find out how long a house typically burns for, and see if you are wasting your time on something that will fail in that timeframe anyway, before putting in the time, money and effort of building a fire rated assembly. Hilti is excellent at coming up with a system and products for that system. They usually consult for free as well!!
 

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Brick and mortar box. Put drywall over brick if you want to hide it. Leave an opening so you can take things in and out. Can use an old fire oven door or something for the opening. I actually found the best place to do this is in a closet ceiling if you have attic space above. It doesn't have to look good so don't worry about the brick job - just make sure that is is pretty well sealed so heat/smoke can't get in. Could use garden stones too.
 
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