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Hi ,
I would like to ask about a weird conversion I heard recently...
An AK-47 has exactly the same chassis with SVD Dragunov so parts as hand guard,stock etc are interchangeable...
So if we change those parts to an AK-47 and add a PSO scope and speaking for the AKs' maximum effective range (I believe it's about 300 meters) can we talk about an acceptable accuracy with the 7.62x39 cartridge? :?
Any opinions are wellcome.
THANKS...xxx
Jim
 

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Not that I'm an expert. But don't bother. There's a reason why the AK-47 keeps on going and going and going. The tolerance between moving parts and the reciever isn't exactly tight - and therefor, neither will the groups be.

I'm not quite sure you can interchange parts between an AK-47 and a SVD, either. But if you've checked it out I'll take your word for it. But I honestly thought I had read somewhere that the SVD had a streched reciever.

In any case, I think you should keep your AK-47 the way it is now.
 

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accuracy with an AK isnt going to be great
like kamatz said the tollerances of the moving parts are so loose and your group will look more like a shotgun pattern
if tollerances were tight you would have to find good match grade 7.62*39mm and there is none
it doesnt have good velocity so it will drop and drift more than any other round out there... comperable to the .30-30 which is a good brush gun round but not a good precision round for the same reason

dragunov is a differnt gun... the dragunov would have to have a streached reciever to handle the 7.62*54mm round which is longer than 7.62*39mm

maybe you can interchange some parts im not sure but id keep it the way it is
 

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The SVD Dragunov has an elongated reciever and firing assembly so as to accomodate the Russian 7.62x51mm or 7.62x53/54R round, depending on when the rifle was made.

Some components are interchangeable, such as the handguard, stock, and such.

The AK-47's maximum effective range is about 300 meters. You're not going to get great groups there, the best I could do at three hundred was to keep them all inside the upper half of the torso. The AK-74 and AK-74M are much better.

You would have to hand-load your own 7.62x39mm and essentially turn the AK-47 into a different rifle to get decent "Designated Marksman" performance out of it. That is why the SVD Dragunov was designed, to lengthen the reach of your standard Soviet Army infantry and mechanized infantry squad to an acceptable standard.
 

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Probably have better luck with an SKS variant, I hear the russian ones are pretty accurate...They're just hard to mount a scope on. People can bed the stock though, and do trigger work on em, usually makes them pretty accurate.
 

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Russian-made SKS rifles are not too bad for accuracy. Mounting an optic would require some kind of case deflector unless you enjoy having hot brass ping off your optic, depending on how you mount it.

It's easier to keep in mind that the Kalashnikov was never really meant to be accurate. Basically a larger submachinegun with a longer range, larger cartridge.
 

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Yeah, good point. Most of the ones I have seen use stubby little optics, or do have the deflector in place. The most solid mounts require drilling and tapping, and just about everything else sucks. My chinese sks doesn't take too long to heat up though, and POI moves a little. Don't see it as being scope worthy just yet. A good aperture sight would be nice though.
 

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Mel, I've seen some mounts that will attach a scout scope onto the gas tube of an SKS, and thats a really cool idea...Mine has a little bit of play to it, where it fits the receiver of the weapon, but I heard with a rubber O ring you can get rid of it. I think the problem with mine is just poor tolerances, and they might not all have that affliction.
 

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I can assure you, not all SKS rifles have the issues you're describing. Any kind of movement where the gas cylinder meets the reciever would generally mean that rifle has been used to cut down a tree, in all the wrong ways.
 

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From what I gather, its common with Chinese and Yugos, not so much with russians. How's the fit on your SKS?

http://www.simonov.net/tips.htm

You'll see what I mean in there, its explained well. Seems to be a common problem. The only thing holding that gas tube steady is that little latch under the rear sight.
 

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I've never had a flaw with a Yugo rifle, but the Russian ones are definately the best. The Chinese ones... well, Norinco can kiss my ass before I'll fire another one of their rifles.
 

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The Yugos are great...the only thing I wish they had was a chrome lined bore. Aside from those M14 copies and crappy steal, whats wrong with Norinco? Their 45s get high praise and I like my SKS
 

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re

Norinco only really have a bad reputation because of the Communist China "Cultural Revolusion", where quality went to ****.
 

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Yeah, pretty much true. I know with their M14s, its supposed to be that the quality of them has improved now. I guess I would have to see one. With the SKS, I think its great. Finish on the stock and blueing is low budget, but the weapon is well constructed and reliable. Kinda like a mini FN tipping bolt action inside. So far its ran Wolf russian ammo and Remington commercial ammo flawlessly. I've read that Norinco has got their standards back up to par again. For $150 Canadian, that SKS is a steal
 

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Agreed on that.

My Bias against NORINCO (Northern Arms Industry Corporation, isn't it?):
Once on a range, I had the opportunity to fire several Izmesh and several Norinco rifles, basically the same design. The rangemaster, a very pleasant Ex-VDV soldier who had served in Afghanistan named Mikhail Sergeevich Petrov as a squad leader handed me a Russian-made (Izmesh) AKMS.

I fired one full magazine, five rounds. Normally it's thirty, but Canadian range restrictions are horsesh*t. So, these five rounds were all on target and within a palm of each other on the target's upper torso, with two rounds sitting neatly in his throat. I was quite pleased.

Switching to a different target, I took the NORINCO AKMS. I fired the same five rounds of the same ammunition. After the second shot, the bolt failed to cycle properly. Mikhail Sergeevich took the rifle from me, cleared the stoppage, and I fired a third round. This too failed to cycle the bolt properly. I cleared the stoppage myself, fired the fourth round. This time the bolt locked back. Having read Gary A. Linderer's account of the "Eldest Son" project in Vietnam I put the Goddamn rifle down before the bolt decided that it would like to nest in my eye socket. Mikhail Sergeevich took one look at the NORINCO AKMS and left it there for Jonathan to clear.

Switching to an "Old School" AK-47 I fired five rounds. This Izmesh weapon functioned flawlessly, even though it was older than I am. Surprisingly, the NORINCO whoreson fired well.

I then checked an AK-74 brought in by a collector. Mikhail Sergeevich fired two magazines, placing his groups in a palm-sized collection on the target's head at seventy-five meters over open sights.
Suitably impressed I fired this AK-74 and decided that 5.45x39mm is one of my new favourite cartridges. I put a fist-sized hole where the targets' aoerta (I apologize for the spelling) would be.

Range between my rifle and the target was seventy-five meters throughout. Since I don't have EagleEyes like most of the guys here I imagine, I was firing based on the geometric center of an identifiable part of the target.

And that's the story of why I hate NORINCO. Later that same year, I fired three SKS rifles, two Yugos and a NORINCO. The NORINCO one decided it would like to jam on me and have someone who'd never cleared a stoppage in it have his thumb sliced up nicely. (Stupid me.)
 

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I had a Norinco AK. (It is now safely buried far from the hands of the gun grabbers.)

Anyway it is a very nice rifle. On the other hand my brother had a Poly Tech and it was a piece of clinton.

It depends on the individual rifle. You can get a good Norinco. But you can get a bad one too.

Mad
 

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I have yet to find a good NORINCO, but now I'll try not to laugh when someone says NORINCO to my face. Nice to know they don't make total pieces of sh*t all the time.
 

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If that Norinco AK was so bad all the time why did anyone even own it? Why was it at the range? Seems it fails every time it fires a round. It would be interesting if you or your Russian friend had pulled the rifle apart and looked for any reason the weapon performed so badly. As far as we know, it just did, and thats a shame. Its too bad you found at least two bum Norincos. Turns out me and Mad found at least two good ones. Its really hard to say what the problem might be especially when the rifle is not your own. I know everything thats happened to my SKS. Looks like with those statistics mine could just have easily been junk.

I'll admit tho man, there is no excuse for even a copy of a Kalashnikov to act like THAT! They're supposed to be tanks
 
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