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Maybe my loads are a little warm, but my brass does not last much past 4 firings with magnum handguns. I get splits in the 44mag brass. I anneal my 500s&w brass to keep it from splitting as quickly.
I would guess you loading hot if your only getting 4 .. I have some starline about to hit 20 loads and regular remmington ammo I get 7 to 8

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I too would suggest you are loading a tad TOO Hot for your own, particular revolver. It could be that with your gun the chambers have been reamed a trifle sloppy by the manufacturer and it is being overly stretched at each firing then compressed hard to get it back into shape in your dies during the reloading process... That would certainly explain the split cases so early on in your reloadings... T.b.h. If that IS the case (pun NOT intended) there is little you can do here cos virtually ANY MAGNUM Reload will stretch the brass out to fill the chambers. That would likely require a completely new cylinder - a potentially expensive fix.

When I was shooting handguns here in the UK - back when we were (sort of) trusted by our then Governments - I didn't go into whether I could find heavier walled brass for my (.357) 6" S&W 586 as even with MY pretty stiff "fun" loads in the Winchester brass I was using they held up pretty well in my revolver, so I had no need to search for 'thicker' brass. But if there IS Thicker Walled Brass, that you can readily source, then that MAY(?) help some??

As to your initial query ref: using LRP in a magnum pistol...
1). They may not fit properly as I believe their external dimensions are slightly greater than the usual LPP you SHOULD be using.
&
2). I think there is slightly more explosive material in the pellet in the cup of rifle primers as compared to pistol primers. If this is so (and I am fairly sure it is) then you could, with an already fairly HOT load, push it into the DANGEROUS PRESSURES level in your revolver. I was always (still am) known to be a "HOT" reloader (now only rifles), but even back then when I COULD reload for a legally held magnum revolver I would NEVER have used a rifle primer (magnum or not) in my magnum revolver reloads..... even assuming those would comfortably fit the primer pockets of my pistol brass ... though it would have been SMALL rifle and pistol primers in my case.

Good Luck - but be Careful!
Blobbs....


ATB ..... and shoot safely

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My loads are well within the range in the book and do not show pressure. I am shooting them in an ultralight s&w and I have to crimp them quite hard to keep bullets from backing out. The strong crimp and moderate to heavy load is probably the culprit, but it shoots well and brass isn’t that expensive.
 
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My loads are well within the range in the book and do not show pressure. I am shooting them in an ultralight s&w and I have to crimp them quite hard to keep bullets from backing out. The strong crimp and moderate to heavy load is probably the culprit, but it shoots well and brass isn’t that expensive.
Do you cross reference your loads with a couple sources? I do.. the reason I ask is you will may find significant differences in min and max between lets say hornady and lyman (just picked those 2 as examples) I've found on my 357 mag the max load in 3 different sources had a 1.5 gr spread which is ALOT on most handgun cals. You probably know all this already but just throwing it out there:)

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Do you cross reference your loads with a couple sources? I do.. the reason I ask is you will may find significant differences in min and max between lets say hornady and lyman (just picked those 2 as examples) I've found on my 357 mag the max load in 3 different sources had a 1.5 gr spread which is ALOT on most handgun cals. You probably know all this already but just throwing it out there:)

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Yes. There is often quite a bit of difference between manuals. I use multiple books and am not to max in any of them. They are not showing pressure signs either which while it comes on fast, they will if they are over pressure. I have shot enough of these loads to know they are not a problem, they just work through brass. The necks splitting are likely because of the hard crimp which is necessary with the ultralight gun.
 
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Yes. There is often quite a bit of difference between manuals. I use multiple books and am not to max in any of them. They are not showing pressure signs either which while it comes on fast, they will if they are over pressure. I have shot enough of these loads to know they are not a problem, they just work through brass. The necks splitting are likely because of the hard crimp which is necessary with the ultralight gun.
Could be.. I use .. I wouldn't say really hard crimp on my 357 and 44mags but definitely between moderate and tight

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where to get one?, any lead
Look at the Frankford arsenal perfect prime. I have one and absolutely love it. It comes with ALL the shell holders, has dead stop and adjustments in .001 plus when you hold it in your hand, you can feel your holding a piece of steel that will last a lifetime

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where to get one?, any lead
PrimalRights.com

The CPS is in a class of its own. I have used other primer seaters and nothing compares.

Call the number on the site. Talk to Greg and he will answer any questions you have. Greg is the inventor of the CPS.
 
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PrimalRights.com

The CPS is in a class of its own. I have used other primer seaters and nothing compares.

Call the number on the site. Talk to Greg and he will answer any questions you have. Greg is the inventor of the CPS.
Id love to have one but I just can't shell out $600.. Ive never used it but I do use the Frankford arsenal perfect prime and it has been flawless, it has adjustable depth, hard stop so you can't crush primers.. if I get a big enough tax return I may invest in one but honestly, my wife's disability and my sons autism therapy leave me pretty broke and I have to make sure they are 1st. Hopefully this year I'll get to be master ranked at MD so I can officially compete in LD but with all this COVID crap and now its mutating.. who knows if we will ever see freedom again.

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Custom Aero Precision M5E1, 18” .308 Win. Wilson Combat barrel, Trijicon CREDO 2.5-15x56 scope
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Here is a very informative video from Super Vel Ammunition about the difference in pressure that using standard, magnum and rifle primers makes:

 

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Cool thanks! Primers are an issue these days
You can safely use magnums almost always you just have to adjust your charge accordingly..
I believe when a round is "proofed" they load it till they get a catastrophic failure within 5 shots and then they reduce that charge by 50% i think.. and that becomes the average load for a given round.. it may be more than 50%.. its been a while since I learned about proofing.. you can take about any minimum load and lower it by 20-25% and it will still clear the barrel... so as long as you start lets say maybe 10-15% below minimum when using magnum where non mags are called for it would be safe and then methodically work up till you find your tolerance. Going to magnums without adjusting charge is likely not going to cause a catastrophic failure but can definitely shorten rifle and component life spans and down the road may cause a serious failure.. I reckon the moral of this is ALWAYS start low, even lower than normal when using magnums and work up in small increments.. id say no more than 2/10gr at a time. There is a lot of room to wiggle and that was put there for safety.. always start low and load a single round at a time until you know they are clearing the barrel.. worse case is a hammer and a good wooden dow to drive it out if you do stick one.

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