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I have a Leupold Mark 4 LR/T M1 w/ BC flip covers on my Savage 10FP, and I would like to maximize reduction in glare and reflection without sacrificing much light transmission. Leupold claims that their Anti-Reflection Device performs similarly to a 7" sunshade, but with a hefty price tag. They also have 2-1/2" and 4" sunshades, at nearly 1/10th the price of the ARD.

The only pros and cons I can come up with, besides price, is purely speculation on my part. I would think that an ARD might reduce glare and reflection regardless of light source location, but may lower light transmission. Sunshades would work as intended, but if there were any light source in front of the scope, would it(the sunshade) be rendered useless?

Can someone give me any advice or at least enlighten me as to the pros and cons of each? Also, if sunshades are great performers, what is a recommended length?
 

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I have used both, They both work great for their intended purposes. If you are looking for anti reflection, a sunshade needs to be at least as long as your objective is wide. The longer the sunshade the more in line your light source has to be with your scope to get a reflection. Sun shades can also be used to help counter act mirage coming off your barrel.

My experience with the honey comb anti reflection device was good. It has a much lower profile than a conventional sunshade. The downside to that is they don't offer any help from mirage coming off your barrel, but hopefully you are shooting fast enough for that to be an issue. I could see some light transmission loss when I was using it at night or low light conditions. I haven't had that problem with a sunshade at any length. I think they claim a small amount, but its noticeable. I also lost a little clarity under those conditions. As far as anti reflection capabilities, I don't think it would out perform a 7" sunshade, it just has a lower profile.

If the sunshade is as long or longer than the width of your objective you will only reflect off something that is in your field of view. Hanging out in shadows tends to minimize this. The honeycomb type give you the effect of a longer sunshade, without the cumbersome thing on top of your rifle, the downside is there is a small loss of clarity and light transmission under low light conditions. In good conditions you would never see it. I think they both have their places. Which I choose to use would depend on what I was using it for. I hope that helps.

Best wishes,
Shane
 
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An ARD is designed to reduce YOUR scopes reflection back toward the light source (Not much catches the eye more than reflected light). They do reduce light transmission, some more than others. Not much help with glare or mirage from the barrel.

Unless you are in a situation where the targets shoot back, go with a sunshade.
 

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ARD Pro: More compact, good reduction of lens flash from oblique light sources...SOME reduction of flash from POA light sources (you should not be pointing into the sun anyway), reduces to some extent the "black hole" image of a scoped rifle, protects objective lens.

ARD Con: will reduce light transmission to a tiny degree, but more importantly, ARD's reduce the RESOLUTION. Key with long range target ID; ARD's do not help with barrel heat mirage, will not help as much as a shade with rain on the OL.

Shade Pro: Helps with heat mirage off barrel to some degree, good reduction of lens flash from oblique light sources, light transmission is exactly as is was without the shade, resolution is unaffected, or positively impacted due to lack of lens flare, protects objective lens.

Shade Con: if contructed of metal, shades increase the leverage on the front bell of the scope should you bump it, or drop it from your Blackhawk accidentally; NO reduction of POA lens flash (again: why are you pointing at the light?); heavier; "blackhole": intact and worse than ever.


As said: ARD's if the "targets" shoot back. And one more time: regardless of which gadget you choose, don't point your weapon in the direction of the light source unless you are indifferent to lens flash as a target indicator.

That all I can think of..
-Nate
 
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Since this really old post got frankensteined back into existence, I'll bite.

Ya gotta love capitalism. Someone selling a $7 sniper veil attached to a $10 hat for $45. The part that got me was the "new". Sniper veils have been around since at least, what? WWI?
 

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Since this really old post got frankensteined back into existence, I'll bite.

Ya gotta love capitalism. Someone selling a $7 sniper veil attached to a $10 hat for $45. The part that got me was the "new". Sniper veils have been around since at least, what? WWI?
The sniper’s veil materials are typically much thicker, a larger pieces and is used for breaking human form. The material it is made of is usually more porous. The GlarEnd Shroud made improvements on lightweight weather proof material that blocks the sun better. It’s ridged enough to pull past the scope like a sunshade. Check out the videos on the website or type GlareEnd Outdoors into YouTube. It’s also foldable and easier to carry. It’s not as large as a snipers Veil and is primarily used to block the sun. People wear hats in the field. This one keeps you ready to mitigate sun glare.
 
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