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Which pattern is the most concealing in a variet of environments? I'm looking into a camo pattern that will best be used in the majority of North American landscapes. Opinions??
 

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Despite what camouflage makers would like you to believe, concealment from animals and from people are two very things. And most hunting camouflage is hype. A plaid shirt breaks up your outline as good as anything, as hunters in the north east have known for years.
 

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Movements and sound are what alert animals usually.
You sneeze then you get the stare down from a doe and the foot stomp.
If they smell you first you may never even see them.
 

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Have you considered a ghillie?

If you've not, then now may be the time. Building one is a serious undertaking, but mine has been extremely rewarding and return on investment has been very good.

Oh, and people can't see them any better than a deer, so that solves that little problem.

-Nate
 

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+1 for the ghille. I bought some Tru-Spec Multicam clothing for hunting this year, and I had my new pair of Danners literally come in today, which are ATACS. Both of them blend very well with WV terrain its actually hard for me to decide which is better for my type of terrain
 

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I like the look of both, but don't think either of them are really ideal for all types of terrain. Mind you, I haven't seen any other patterns that fit the bill 100% either.

One thing you may want to consider is how widespread multicam use is, because of this there are many manufacturers making a wide variety of garments, whereas you will be somewhat more limited in choice if you choose ATACS. Another plus for multicam is the availability of cheap and hard wearing military surplus.
 

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Well worn OD's and a good ghilli along with over whites for winter. Natick labs handles all the testing on uniform patterns etc and I remember seeing the results of a long study where OD's did as well as anything else with the old woodlands right there too. MARPAT is good and that is what our team snipers were using but we just go OD now like the rest of the team and it works just fine. As stated above it is not about the uniform that gets you busted it is: movement, outline, shine and noise. I have chased suspects into wooded areas 100 times and every time we find a hider it is from one of the above and not what they are wearing.

Sully
 

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That ATACS is new to me, but here are my thoughts.

I was in the Corps 1982-88 when Woodlands were relatively new. I wore the ERDL because it was "old salt",and I felt it was a better pattern than the Woodlands. But before long I was no longer allowed to wear them as the ERDLs were completely phased out.

I remember thinking that the "ultimate" camouflage would be made up of small dots that matched the near environment, like leaves, but also that those dots would also have density patterns that would appear to be larger "blotches" at distance to break up the outline.

When I first saw MARPAT, I thought, "FINALLY!" I loved it and still do. It's just like what I had envisioned, except for three key points:
1) I felt a very deep brown would look more natural than black.
2) I wasn't too keen on the shapes being unnaturally rectangular.
3) I didn't like that there was an "orientation" to the pattern.

Now that I have seen the ATACS, again I say, "FINALLY!!!", but even more emphatically!
It is the same in principle as the MARPAT, but addresses the very concerns I had about it. I think it is the best camouflage I have seen yet, and I can't think of any way to improve upon it. The only problem I see would be if the colors and brightnesses were wrong for the given area. But that applies to any pattern. I think I'll have to buy a set and try them out. Hopefully the line will expand to cover all other common field gear.
 

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To date, multicam is the most versatile pattern that I've seen. I've been using it for the last 2 years in one capacity or another, and fellow hunters always comment on how "invisible" I am. As mentioned in this thread, if you can hide from a human, you can EASILY hide from an animal. Take a look at this picture:



Kryptek highlander top, but I find it too dark, as is the case with nearly every camo on the market... they are too dark. Kryptek nomad is pretty good stuff, but highlander is too dark for most areas. Look at the contrast compared to those multicam pants. Imagine if the picture was from 50yds away. Numerous people have seen me walking around with that exact setup on, and they all say that my legs are near invisible. When I stop, it looks like a suspended torso. So, my vote goes for multicam, but I leave the door open for other contenders. That atacs fg looks ok, but it doesn't have the small dots of high contrast white to break it up a bit at distance. I bet it will wash together at range, and result in an outline.
 

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I hve experimented with number of patterns over the years ranging from commercial "hunting" patterns to "tactical" stuff from several nations. For my property in the Missouri Ozarks, I have found Multicam to be the best for the fall/winter/early spring. But good old OD is the best for summer. However, I do throw the ghillie on when the hogs and meth addicts show up. I have found them both to be easily spooked by sudden movements and unfamiliar sounds. ;)
 

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Have you considered a ghillie?

If you've not, then now may be the time. Building one is a serious undertaking, but mine has been extremely rewarding and return on investment has been very good.

Oh, and people can't see them any better than a deer, so that solves that little problem.

-Nate
If your looking for a proper Ghilie construction you will Need the following:

1) heavy needle and Thread
2) BDU, DCU, Multicam, ATAC's, OG017's as a Base layer (arra of ops dependent)
3) Foam Sleeping mat (Easy to cut)
4) Shoe Goo
5) Canvass (old service duffle bags)
6) Jute (Stripping sand bags)
7) Gloves
8) Recommend Medical shears (They cut through everything)

Construction

1) Take your Base Layer and lay it our on the ground so the back of the back of the pants is skyward and the Top is face down.
2) Cut your puss pad to the length desired for the front of your bottoms as well as the elbow area as well as the front of your top.
3) Shoe goo the puss pad cutouts on the areas most used on the ground. Knees, thighs, elbows front of the jacket. (This is tailored to how you operate)
4) Once your Pads are shoe goo'd down well, Take the canvass and over lap it on the pads and lock stitch it down, (You need to ensure you have heavy thread as well as needles)
5) Once this is complete, you can start stripping the Jute from your sandbags. You should strip at least 15 bags to have the just you need to add to your ghillie as well as have some left over to replace when the old wears out.
6)When you have your jute stripped you need to add it sparingly. You don't want to look like a ball O Jute (Not natural) remember you will add vegetation to your suit depending on the areas in which you operate in.

Recommend accessories to have

1) Pruning shears
2) Range finder
3) GPS
4) Range cards Laminated
5) Grease pencil
6) Note book (Recon information to establish a patter with your game)
7) Plastic baggies To water proof everything.
8) Tripod to shoot from or to stack off of in your bowling alley
9) Bonnie Hat
10) Face cammo
 

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OK, I like Multi-Terrain Pattern...my 0.02$ :)


To date, multicam is the most versatile pattern that I've seen. I've been using it for the last 2 years in one capacity or another, and fellow hunters always comment on how "invisible" I am. As mentioned in this thread, if you can hide from a human, you can EASILY hide from an animal. Take a look at this picture:



Kryptek highlander top, but I find it too dark, as is the case with nearly every camo on the market... they are too dark. Kryptek nomad is pretty good stuff, but highlander is too dark for most areas. Look at the contrast compared to those multicam pants. Imagine if the picture was from 50yds away. Numerous people have seen me walking around with that exact setup on, and they all say that my legs are near invisible. When I stop, it looks like a suspended torso. So, my vote goes for multicam, but I leave the door open for other contenders. That atacs fg looks ok, but it doesn't have the small dots of high contrast white to break it up a bit at distance. I bet it will wash together at range, and result in an outline.
 

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Contrary to what government and Pentagon bean counters would want you to believe, there is no magical camouflage that is all things to all situations.

The reality is that like most choices, you must decide to either specialize and be very good at a single (or few) things or generalize and be okay or good, but not excellent at a bunch of things.

Some patterns do well in certain environments and fall short in others. It all depends on where you're going to be operating.
 

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The best camouflage is always remaining absolutely still - and that's one of the huge problems with camouflage patterns. They may look great when posed against a background but not work worth a darn if the target is moving. Add into that the fact that this is a billion dollar industry with very sophisticated marketing people who can convince you that a dayglow orange leisure suit is what you need, and you have a real confusing mess on your hands.

Here's an interesting article on the subject: The History of Invisibility and the Future of Camouflage
 

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Doug's comment about the meth addicts has me intrigued.
Are they just roaming around in the woods like Zombies in The Walking Dead?
Hogs can be a very nervous bunch of critters.
 

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Doug's comment about the meth addicts has me intrigued.
Are they just roaming around in the woods like Zombies in The Walking Dead?
Hogs can be a very nervous bunch of critters.
Unfortunately to some extent they are. The addicts have discovered that if they steal scrap metal and redeem it they can score a few hits. Drove into my camp last fall to find a couple of the scuz buckets trying to make off with my BBQ pit and a sundry other items in camp. Now bear in mind that I am three miles from the nearest road at this point. So it's obvious they hve been doing a bit of recon.

A friend and I also watched as as three of these delightful folks boldly walked right up his driveway to snatch the empty 55 gallon drums he had by his garage (he does metalwork and turns them into BBQ pits and other stuff). They took off like their hair was on fire and their asses was catching when we walked out the door.
 

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The best camouflage is always remaining absolutely still - and that's one of the huge problems with camouflage patterns. They may look great when posed against a background but not work worth a darn if the target is moving.

There's a lot to be said for basic OG-17 in more environments than patterned camouflages. Let shadows and foliage form the pattern, while the OG-17 simply blends and doesn't attract the eye. It often works well in forest, scrub, and barren or rocky terrain.
 
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