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I was curious if anyone feels there is a benefit in mounting the bipod as far forward as you can? I know for stocks with two sling mount points the Harris type bipods would be mounted on the forward stud to prevent the sling from getting in the way. My question is more or less in reference to my AICS. I decided to pick up the Atlas bipod went with the rail mount because I already had a rail mounted on the bottom of the stock. This sets the bipod back a bit from where the Harris stud is and even further back from where the AI Spigot would mount. At the range the other day a fellow shooter apprached me and advised me the mounting point of my bipod would "mess me up" because it is "too far back" and "will cause shooter problems". I told him I appreciated the advice and pointed out is was perhaps 2" further back from where my Harris was mounted. The reply was "that will be enough to cause problems" and before I could have him provide a detailed explanation he walked off.

Now common sense tells me it should not make much of an issue, and considering I was still shooting cloverleafs and big bug holes I think its overrated, if a issue at all. But my question to the collective is; does position make a difference? And position relative to the front 1/3 of the rifle stock.

Sully
 

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Darn good question!

I know that when shooting from a pack or a sandbag, it's often advised to move forward on the bag. And the same thing holds true when using a tripod mount like this one:
http://soldiersystems.net/2012/08/07/hog-saddle-in-action/
But bipods are usually placed as far forward as practical.

Having something further forward will decrease the effect of both lateral and vertical movement, which might well be desired. IOW, the further the fulcrum is from the center, the more you have to move the back end to produce the same amount of movement.

With the tripod, you want the weight more balanced and easier to pan to track a moving target.

With a pack or a bag, the same may apply or it may be to reduce the chance that part of the bag will contact the barrel.

Feel free to ridicule any answer I have given 'cause it's pretty much a shot in the dark.
 

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The benefit of mounting bipod far forward has to do with leverage fine adjustment.
Here is an experiment for you to understand the principal.
Take a pen in your hand and hold it close to the tip. With your other hand move the back of the pen up, down, side to side. Notice how much movement the tip of the pen has, and how precise you can control it by making small movements.
Now, hold the pen further back, lets go at least mid ways so you can really see whats going on here. Now move the back of the pen up, down, side, to side, and observe the tip how little it takes to move the tip around compared to our last configuration. And how hard it would be to make fine adjustments.

I hope you can understand all that.
 

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Every so often I re-read this post over at AccurateShooter about this guy 'Froggy" - I'm sure people in the know know who he is - but he shoots amazingly well from a standard 6-9" Harris bipod. It's worth a read, if you haven't. For what it is worth his bipod is located in what I would say as a standard position on the forearm.

http://www.accurateshooter.com/shooting-skills/bugholes-from-bipod/

I remember reading about F-class shooters optimizing their bipod positions for increased precision, but those rifles can be so different that the arguments might not be relevant.
 

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Position can also depend on the overall "balance" of the firearm. Long barreled rifles benefit from the forward position, short barreled may respond better to a rest that's farther back.

Best answer actually comes from the shooter experimenting with their own rifle.
 

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Ok, so I know I'm a very years later to this party but hopefully someone is still watching this thread. One question I didn't see on here was whether or not stance plays a factor in where your bipod should be. Does bipod position matter depending on if you are prone, kneeling, or sitting? Or does stance play no part in it?
 
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