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Discussion Starter #1
i have a old school remington 700 that has no sling stud or and stud for that matter up from i want to mount a bipod but have no clue what to do. i dont want to change the stock. so what are my options here? im thinking of gluing a rail to the bottom so i can mount a bipod but idk any help will be greatly appreciated.
 

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Wood or synthetic stock? Sling studs can be added to either. Don't glue a pic rail to the stock. Use screws.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
its a wood stock but i dont have the money to take it to gun shop is it something i can do at home with simple drill and tools i am mechanically inclined just not sure of what to do
 

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its a wood stock but i dont have the money to take it to gun shop is it something i can do at home with simple drill and tools i am mechanically inclined just not sure of what to do
It is not difficult. Just add a simple stud and use a harris. No noticeable change to the stock...much less damage than gluing a rail. Just be sure to use the right drill bits and also make sure that the screw on the stud is short enough that it doesn't touch the barrel.
 

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There are two types of studs, screw in and bolt in. Regardless of type, you are probably going to want to remove the stock to work on it.

Screw-ins will work with wood but I'm not sure they would stand up to a lot of stress so may be a bad idea.

Bolt in's have a backer plate and you would have to remove the stock.

There is a type that has a metal insert that fitted and glued into the stock and the stud is screwed into that.
 

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you will want the mount with the backer plate. The last thing you want is to drop your rifle because the sling swivel pulled out. Removing the stock is very simple and straight forward. If it is an ADL model you will have three screws on the underside. A BDL model has two screws...either way the barreled action will drop right out of the stock when you remove those screws. just don't over torque them when you are reinstalling. Also, you might need to hog out space for the backer plate to keep it out of the barrel.
 

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Don't mount a bipod to a screw in type stud that has wood-screw like threads. It will work loose eventually and pull all the wood threads out of the stock


You want to use a sling swivel stud that has machine screw threads on it.

The one on the right in this pic is what you want to use.



Remove the stock, drill a pilot hole (1/16"-1/8") through it where you want the stud and then on the barrel channel side add a "Tee Nut". You can get these at most hardware stores.





It can be done with a cordless drill, a couple of drill bits, some epoxy and enough masking tape to protect surrounding stock surfaces.

A simple method is to drill a very small diameter hole through the stock at the desired stud location. Drill the recess in the barrel channel using a spade bit. Then drill the small hole out so the tee nut will fit flush at the middle. If there is any wood remaining at the bottom where the small diameter locating hole was drilled, just drill it out so the swivel threads will pass through and into the metal threads. Once the Tee Nut is fitted, just epoxy it in place using 5-Minute Epoxy.
 

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Don't mount a bipod to a screw in type stud that has wood-screw like threads. It will work loose eventually and pull all the wood threads out of the stock
I have several rifles with that setup... no issues. Granted I don't beat them up much either, but it is certainly good enough for most people's use.
 

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Make sure it's clean & no FOD gets in when fitting the stock back on, then torque it up to the correct setting & it should be fine.
 

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I have several rifles with that setup... no issues. Granted I don't beat them up much either, but it is certainly good enough for most people's use.

I tend to look long term. The Tee Nut is what's recommended but I suppose one could just get by with a screw in. I just remember the old saying "Why is it that we never have time to do it right but always have the time to do it over?"

The wood-screw type are really only meant for use with a sling. A bipod attachment can put a lot of direct tension on the screw and if it's pulled out it takes a lot of wood with it.

Just saying.
 

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I have several rifles with that setup... no issues. Granted I don't beat them up much either, but it is certainly good enough for most people's use.
Would the addition of a little epoxy be appropriate or is that overkill?
 

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Would the addition of a little epoxy be appropriate or is that overkill?
Epoxy alone wouldn't be much help by itself. It's the larger surface area of the "Tee-Nut" that provides the benefit. Epoxy would just make the screw "non-removable" but not reinforce the wood.

Note: There are huge variations in wood quality and density in rifle stocks. If you look at an inexpensive hunting rifle stock it may be made from a wood that isn't much more dense than the grain of a 2X4. Others use exotic woods like Walnut, Maple, and others, often selected for the beauty of their grain structure and hardness. If the stud is screwed into a stock that has wood nearly as hard and strong as a block of metal that's one thing. I've worked with some woods that are so hard you have to literally tap the hole to get a screw to go into it without breaking off while screwing it it. Stocks similar to that used on Ruger 10/22's are entirely different..
 

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Thinking of the epoxy on this. It my help some depending on what epoxy is used as some soak in...the downside is if it does pull out any wood that it soaked into will likely come with it. A Tee-nut would be the better way for sure.

And like Ravenblack said you'll be fine as long as you put it back together right...
 

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Or if you are really not comfortable doing the job yourself, if you have the money to buy all the hardware to do it right...you have the money to pay most gunsmiths to install one for you. It is by no means an expensive or time intensive task.
 

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Or if you are really not comfortable doing the job yourself, if you have the money to buy all the hardware to do it right...you have the money to pay most gunsmiths to install one for you. It is by no means an expensive or time intensive task.
True, if you don't mind waiting for the 'smith to get around to doing the work. Most of them here are backed up that an afternoon DIY project will end up separating you and your rifle for 10 weeks or more.
 

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True, if you don't mind waiting for the 'smith to get around to doing the work. Most of them here are backed up that an afternoon DIY project will end up separating you and your rifle for 10 weeks or more.
Wouldn't have to be done local though...most things I have done are just a few day turn around. Time between shipping the rifle/parts out and getting them back is 1-2 weeks for most things
 

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Wouldn't have to be done local though...most things I have done are just a few day turn around. Time between shipping the rifle/parts out and getting them back is 1-2 weeks for most things
I guess my point is that there are some tasks that make sense for a gun owner to learn how to do themselves. Add the shipping expense to event he best "turn around" time and to me it makes no sense to send work like adding a sling stud out. Not when the cost of materials is less than that of the shipping alone.

On the other hand I keep forgetting that I grew up in an age when people weren't as afraid of tools like many in this current era. I guess that's why good gunsmiths are getting so busy and so many not so good gunsmiths are getting in the business.
 
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