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Best camo? The enemy being blind and deaf! :wink:

On a serious note, I prefer terrain and vegetation, using cloth does not give you the same natural look, light diffusion and reflection is different, for example.
 

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I agree with what has been said. And to be honest, the thing that works best for me, keep something between me and the bad guys. Like a hill, or a tree, etc. It just is so much easier that way. Use the terrain to your advantage, and don't get careless.

MEL
 

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As I posted in another thread:

Location, Location, location.

If you are good enough at finding suitable locations, you don't necessarily need a ghillie(For movement, a ghillie can give you away even more than wearing your ordinary uniform)
 
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The best cloth camo pattern depends on where you plan on being. Woodland camo may not be the best choice if you're spending your time in the snow, and an artic pattern will stink in the woods. For most of the continental U.S., woodland camo with attachment points will work great. I like tiger stripe camo even better, but it's harder to find. It works in the woods and is not too bad in an urban environment either. Figure out where you're going to be spending your time and find the pattern that blends the best with your surroundings. And Mel's right, keeping something between you and the bad guys is still the best idea.

K2
 

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Discussion Starter #10
thanks guys. My are is mostly white birch with some black and white spruce and lots of underbrush, like alders and willows.
 

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When you say cloth camo, do you mean the material or the pattern?

If its material you are looking for I prefer 100% cotton rip-stop. Although the NYCO is more durable, the 100% cotton is cooler and fades quicker creating more subdued colours. There is also 100% cotton twill, good if you hunt in cold weather, and a poly-cotton blend that is almost as cool as the rip-stop but better at wicking away moisture.

If it’s a pattern you’re looking for, it really comes down to your surroundings. I suppose desert camo wouldn’t work too well in Alaska, so I would go with either woodland or see what you might find in a local surplus store, maybe something from Sweden, Switzerland or some eastern European country where snow is common. If you plan on a hunting trip, try ‘sticks & limbs’ camo.
 

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For all-around (excluding desert, arctic, ect.) use, I prefer the standard US woodland pattern. It blends well just about anywhere (again excluding desert, arctic, ect.). The British military pattern is also good. German flectar sound like it would work well in your part of the country (plus the fact that you can get a whole flectar suit for a few bucks).

The problem with tiger stipe is that the shadows in the pattern are all go horazontally (sp?). If the shadows in the woods in which you are traveling all go a different direction, you will stand out.

For desert/arid environments, I would go for US tri-color desert or British desert. The original six-color desert storm pattern is to contrasting.

As for snow camo, I think an East German poncho or camo suit would work excelent in the area you described. They are available from Cabelas.
 
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