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Discussion Starter #1
I asked around my gunsmiths and couldnt find a cheap deal. I asked the place I bought it from and didnt get a response from the Tac Ops Team (hence they are most likely busy.) So I finally got the balls to do it my self. I followed the instructions they included to the "T" and It came out pretty damn good. Here are the following pictures and will do a semi walk thru. Hope you enjoy its been a intresting night. -Standard Issue

This is the Start, shows the bolt and the knob and stud from tac ops


First off I masked the bolt with a ziplok bag so metal shavings dont get any where they dont need.


Next I cut off the Original Knob with a hack saw. Then follow the instructions and make a perfectly square cut going with the arm off of the bolt.


Get a Center punch and a right angle, Make a punch at the center of the flat surface that you have made with the cut.


Drill a hole where you have made the center punch guide with a #23 drill bit and it should go about 3/4's of a inch deep. When you get done with the hole test fit the stud.


Finally take your silver solder and a butane torch, and get ready to solder the stud on the arm. Before you do this get a really wet towel and wrap it around the bolt itself leaving the arm exposed. Turn on the heat and heat the arm evenly. When its hot enough the flux with suck up the silver and fill the gap.


Finish it off by filing down the excess solder and clean up the stud be anymeans (fine sandpaper/ Steel Wool/ ect.)

I added a matte black paint to the stud keeping it a nice tone with the arm. Here are the finished product shots.





If you have questions feel free to ask.

Amount of time taken 2 hours and 30 mins.
 

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Very cool post, congrats on a job well done!
 

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Good job, was if hard at all?

Erik
 

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Discussion Starter #6
lol thanks guys, im not gonna say it was hard.. but for a first timer you will deff. hold your breath at some points. as long as you have a vice and drill press i think youll be alright. Just take her slow and steady and make sure that

1. your plane is square

2. that the drill bit is going to be perfectly straight and narrow.

I had a bit of a problem scoring the metal before drilling, when I put it on the press the bit wanted to flex over to a small divit that was there becasue the whole bolt was pressed and it had small pockets of air in it.

Other than that it was fine. if you need help or anything Id be more than willing to help any of you out.

make sure that the silver solder you get is a high grade silver with about 45% in it. Makes for a lower melting point and still as stong.
 

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We just sold the last knob this morning on the store, but do not worry, we have more already on their way here for those that want to do the tac-ops bolt knob conversion.

MEL
 

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Thanks for the write up, I'm sure you've put some questions to rest. Looks great.

Anyone know what the threaded piece that you insert into the bolt handle is made out of? As in what steel specifically (not just "metal" haha)?
Interested, but I would rather weld it in. I was thinking that cutting a 1/4" long channel into the underside of the bolt handle's body would allow for a solid weld. Perhaps silver soldering is strong enough, I don't have a clue.

Perhaps this is something I'd be better off taking up w/ Mike.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I did some basic R&D on either tig weld or silver solder. Trust me this silver solder is not going anywhere. I hit the bolt into the action as hard as i could throw it, just to test the strength... ITS NOT GOING ANYWHERE! Unless I throw my gun down and lands on the knob itself. You can tig weld it and the stud I belive is not stainless but what they call "tool" steel, It oxidizes very easy and has the benifit of a high melting temp. That makes it a perfect metal to weld/solder (or anything involving heat.) If you were going to take the weld route, lay a nice tig all around the circumfance of the stud and sand/file down. Then for sure that bad boys not going anywhere. Silver solder will work with ANY steel, stainless or not. MAKE SURE TO USE FLUX!!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
AHH also, there are diffrent grades of silver solder. The higher the concentration of silver in the solder your using the more strength it will have... But on the down side the higher the silver the higher the melting point becomes... Thus making you heat your bolt arm to almost cherry red temps. This can cause problems with your blueing finish on the bolt and or deform the arm if it decideds to sag.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Awesome I made the Sticky achivement! :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
thanks, congrats on your new promotion as well.
 

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Great post great photos.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
heheh I think the photos compliment beats them all, That my day job after all! Appreciate that much sir!
 

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So did you file a grove in the bolt to allow solder to flow and steam to escape?
This is the one part of the process i'm a little confused about, which also happens to be the one part of the process i'm actually involved in as my roommmate is a machinist and is doing everything else.
Also, where did you buy the silver solder at?
Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
i bought it at a lowes, and i didnt cut the knotch. I used a metric drillbit instead of the one they called for and it was a bit bigger. It was enough that i thought would let out the pressure just fine. if you are worried about it file down a small flat gruve on the side of the stud. that will work just as well and allow steam to excape and the solder to flow.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
high temp black spray paint.
 

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my DIY knob

I cant solder worth a crap, I probably should have it tig welded. I went and did it the ol JB weld way. It looks good too. I have enough confidence in JB weld, it should hold nicely. I one time wanted to put a flash suppressor on a WASR but the threads were beat down because of the restrictions at the time. I JB'd it and when a friend of mine had possession of the rifle he wanted to remove it and have it sent off for a more traditonal slant break installed. We had to cut the suppressor off in 4 different pieces. As the ols saying goes, there is more than one to skin a cat. Why on earth someone would want to skin one is beyond me.
 

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Standard Issue said:
lol thanks guys, im not gonna say it was hard.. but for a first timer you will deff. hold your breath at some points. as long as you have a vice and drill press i think youll be alright. Just take her slow and steady and make sure that

1. your plane is square

2. that the drill bit is going to be perfectly straight and narrow.

I had a bit of a problem scoring the metal before drilling, when I put it on the press the bit wanted to flex over to a small divit that was there becasue the whole bolt was pressed and it had small pockets of air in it.

You can avoid your drill from "Walking" or starting off center or worse, starting a crooked hole by first "piloting" your hole with one of these "Center Drills" ; they are designed expressly for the purpose of "Starting" the hole you wish to drill. As you can see, by design, they are very rigid and will not "Wander" or start crookedly. Buy yourself a small set for cheap from Enco or Harbor Frieght. It will save you countless "Oh Sugar" moments when trying to drill that hole in the top of an ancient mauser action...or cut off Remington bolt handle...or...

Dont try to drill the entire depth with these, just use it to drill up to where the taper begins on the shank or a little more. This will give you a dead straight and accurately placed "Start" to begin using your regular twist bit in. These things are better than sliced bread for starting holes in metal you wish to drill, I learned the hard (Read; Expensive) way about them years ago and have never looked back.


 
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