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What are the advantages and disadvantages of having a FFP scope?


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Advantages are, at no mater what magnification ( on mil reticle for example) the distance from one dot to the next is one mil where as with sfp, the distances between marks change with the magnification. The only thing I could think of that could be considered a advantage of sfp( and to me its not a advantage) is that sfp scopes the reticle stays the same size all the way through your magnification settings. Another big advantage to me of the ffp mil tree like ebr2c is you can know the distance of a object as long as you know the size of the object.

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For example, if you know your object is 2 yard in width or height, you multiply 2 x 1000 then divide by number of dots it takes in your scope. Let's say it takes 5 dots... 2x1000=2000... 2000 ÷5 =400.. so you know your target is 400 yards away, that let's you quickly set your dope or adjust your hold once you have developed your range card for a given round/load

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Advantage of FFP scope is since the reticle is in relation to the magnification, reticle values are true at any magnification. That will make making corrections fast and easy. Don't really need to do any sort of calculation of the reticle as you change the magnification. Very useful when shooting long range. The downside is at the larger magnification, the reticle can be thicker than you would like it to be depends on the brand. Sometimes, depends on the target size, the thick reticle at the larger magnification can obscure your target. Also, the price is usually higher than SFP.

Advantage of SFP is even when dialed up to large magnification, the reticle will remain thin and it won't obscure your target. SFP can be useful when hunting short to medium range and bench rest shooting. Unless you are long range hunter, your scope mag power is usually maximum of 10x to 14x. Most of the times, you will be cranking up to max for games beyond 100 yards, the reticle value is true and you can manipulate the ranging accordingly. That doesn't mean you can't use for long range shooting. I have 4x - 14x power SHV on my MK12 clone which is SFP shooting out to 800 yds. I just crank it up to 14 and leave it there and do or the correction.
 

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Advantage of FFP scope is since the reticle is in relation to the magnification, reticle values are true at any magnification. That will make making corrections fast and easy. Don't really need to do any sort of calculation of the reticle as you change the magnification. Very useful when shooting long range. The downside is at the larger magnification, the reticle can be thicker than you would like it to be depends on the brand. Sometimes, depends on the target size, the thick reticle at the larger magnification can obscure your target. Also, the price is usually higher than SFP.

Advantage of SFP is even when dialed up to large magnification, the reticle will remain thin and it won't obscure your target. SFP can be useful when hunting short to medium range and bench rest shooting. Unless you are long range hunter, your scope mag power is usually maximum of 10x to 14x. Most of the times, you will be cranking up to max for games beyond 100 yards, the reticle value is true and you can manipulate the ranging accordingly. That doesn't mean you can't use for long range shooting. I have 4x - 14x power SHV on my MK12 clone which is SFP shooting out to 800 yds. I just crank it up to 14 and leave it there and do or the correction.
I personally (and I do get its all what one prefers and is accustomed to) but since switching to ffp scopes (vortex and really starting to develope a high opinion of primary arms scopes) my shooting regardless of if its 25 yards or 1000 has become simpler. I just leave them cranked up to 26 for the most part and memorized my range card and just adjust my hold.. beyond 1k I have to adjust elevation on the turrets but up to 1k no turrets adjustments at all just adjust the hold. I recon you could do that with a sfp but I think you would basically have to have a range card for each magnification wouldnt you?.. legit asking i never went beyond 200 yards back when I used sfp and always left mag cranked to max

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I personally (and I do get its all what one prefers and is accustomed to) but since switching to ffp scopes (vortex and really starting to develope a high opinion of primary arms scopes) my shooting regardless of if its 25 yards or 1000 has become simpler. I just leave them cranked up to 26 for the most part and memorized my range card and just adjust my hold.. beyond 1k I have to adjust elevation on the turrets but up to 1k no turrets adjustments at all just adjust the hold. I recon you could do that with a sfp but I think you would basically have to have a range card for each magnification wouldnt you?.. legit asking i never went beyond 200 yards back when I used sfp and always left mag cranked to max

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Second Focal Plane scopes with ranging or holdover reticles are usually set by the manufacturer to be accurate at one magnification and that's it. Usually, except for one Leopold scope that I have, this is at the maximum magnification. This can be problematic if you have to deal with mirage. Sometimes cranking the magnification down helps with mirage but if you do and you're engaging a 1000k target, your holdover marks on as second focal plane scope will NOT equal the precise mill radians for elevation or wind that you want according to your range card. I never bothered to test this once I got into LR. I noted what the pro shooters were using at PRS events. I asked them why and.... that was the end of my second focal plane rifle scope purchases.
 

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Second Focal Plane scopes with ranging or holdover reticles are usually set by the manufacturer to be accurate at one magnification and that's it. Usually, except for one Leopold scope that I have, this is at the maximum magnification. This can be problematic if you have to deal with mirage. Sometimes cranking the magnification down helps with mirage but if you do and you're engaging a 1000k target, your holdover marks on as second focal plane scope will NOT equal the precise mill radians for elevation or wind that you want according to your range card. I never bothered to test this once I got into LR. I noted what the pro shooters were using at PRS events. I asked them why and.... that was the end of my second focal plane rifle scope purchases.
Thats what seemed to make sense. With my FFP scopes, I have 1 range card for each rifle and that range card is good at whatever magnification i use, I really loved that once I got into precision shooting and reloading. Heck, once you find your accuracy load just chrono it and you can create your range card without firing another shot.. you always want to confirm it but you get what I'm saying:) have you tried out primary arms scopes?

https://www.primaryarms.com/pa-3-18x50mm-illuminated-ffp-rifle-scope-with-athena-bpr-mil-reticle

I got that one on a recommendation from a friend and in my opinion its on par with vortex, In fact I like the clicks of the turrets better than vortex, very defined and the return to zero has been perfect putting it through its paces, i mounted it on a AR10-308 I built.. i can't stress enough how happy I've been with it so far. They don't have the "no questions asked" warranty of my vortex scopes but clarity and quality seems to be every bit as good.

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Thank you. So it seems FFP was an upgrade to the SFP. I tend to shoot better with lower magnification. I was shooting 1000 yards on the 6x. The 24x always was off a bit. Something made me think parallax had something to do with that. Today I noticed a dial on my scope that was next to the Illuminating dial on the left side with numbers from 50 to 1000. I read somewhere that this is for setting the parallax at each distance. I wanna see how that goes for me with hornady superformance ammo at 1000 yards.
 

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Thats what seemed to make sense. With my FFP scopes, I have 1 range card for each rifle and that range card is good at whatever magnification i use, I really loved that once I got into precision shooting and reloading. Heck, once you find your accuracy load just chrono it and you can create your range card without firing another shot.. you always want to confirm it but you get what I'm saying:) have you tried out primary arms scopes?

https://www.primaryarms.com/pa-3-18x50mm-illuminated-ffp-rifle-scope-with-athena-bpr-mil-reticle

I got that one on a recommendation from a friend and in my opinion its on par with vortex, In fact I like the clicks of the turrets better than vortex, very defined and the return to zero has been perfect putting it through its paces, i mounted it on a AR10-308 I built.. i can't stress enough how happy I've been with it so far. They don't have the "no questions asked" warranty of my vortex scopes but clarity and quality seems to be every bit as good.

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Thats the 308 I put it on, I intentionally attempted to make it look so so but it is as accurate as bolt gun


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Thank you. So it seems FFP was an upgrade to the SFP. I tend to shoot better with lower magnification. I was shooting 1000 yards on the 6x. The 24x always was off a bit. Something made me think parallax had something to do with that. Today I noticed a dial on my scope that was next to the Illuminating dial on the left side with numbers from 50 to 1000. I read somewhere that this is for setting the parallax at each distance. I wanna see how that goes for me with hornady superformance ammo at 1000 yards.
Yes, if its FFP that is likely the paralax (or side focus) and that makes all the difference in the world at long range. Your paralax is equal to your objective lense size at 100 yards so example if you have a 55mm objective lense then you have the potential for 55mm of being off, at 200 yards the goes to 110mm , 400 yards 220mm and so on so you can see that having that paralax adjustment can make a big difference at long range

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Yes, if its FFP that is likely the paralax (or side focus) and that makes all the difference in the world at long range. Your paralax is equal to your objective lense size at 100 yards so example if you have a 55mm objective lense then you have the potential for 55mm of being off, at 200 yards the goes to 110mm , 400 yards 220mm and so on so you can see that having that paralax adjustment can make a big difference at long range

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Or maybe its the radius.. i can't remember off hand.. but either way, at long distance, its a sizable area

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Or maybe its the radius.. i can't remember off hand.. but either way, at long distance, its a sizable area

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I think you misunderstood what parallax is. It has nothing to do with radius, objective lens size or what so ever.
 

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FFP is superior in almost every way. I would not go back to SFP for any reason. I hunt short range with FFP and love them. If something walks out a little farther away, then the lines are accurate. I hunt long range with FFP too. I killed a prairie dog at 980 yards with a 3-15 FFP set to 15x’s. The reticle was not “too thick” to see the prairie dog and the as not too thick to even know whether I was on right side of him or left. This year I used my 5-25 FFP and same thing. No problems with “thick reticle” that everyone seems to have trouble with.

As far as parallax goes, it makes a big difference. You must learn to adjust it if you want to shoot precisely. My Tangent Theta scopes are parallax free beyond 270 yards which is really nice.

If you are serious about using a mil or moa reticle for long range shooting OR hunting and want to take an extra variable out of the equation, then FFP is the best way to go.
 

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Thank you. So it seems FFP was an upgrade to the SFP. I tend to shoot better with lower magnification. I was shooting 1000 yards on the 6x. The 24x always was off a bit. Something made me think parallax had something to do with that. Today I noticed a dial on my scope that was next to the Illuminating dial on the left side with numbers from 50 to 1000. I read somewhere that this is for setting the parallax at each distance. I wanna see how that goes for me with hornady superformance ammo at 1000 yards.
Here's little tip about parallax adjustment. Or maybe you already know this.

There's a lot of people out there who defines parallax is to focus the picture in the scope. Well, it does that, too. But, having the picture focused is a byproduct of it not the objectivity.

Adjusting parallax is to have the target and the reticle on the same plane. You know that by nodding your head slightly and if you see the reticle remain on the target at stationary manner, then it's parallax free.

Now there's some catches here. You may find the parallax knob not indicating same number as actual distance of the target. Also, you may find that the picture of the view is not well focused either. As long as you acquired parallax free, these can happen and it's OK.

My eyes have suffered a lot of computer games, cell phone games and took some beating as a child and aged bit. I even have to dial down the reticle focus almost to the end of - side. Therefore, the picture won't be clear when the target is on the correct plane with each other. Something I have to live with it. Or.... I can just dial it until I can see the target focused clearly and make sure I am perfectly behind the scope by making sure I don't see any sort of scope shadow, which is not that easy.
 

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Send that rifle to us at Primal Finish. We will have it looking like new.

Primalfinish.Com
Can you finish it to match the tungsten grey grip and handguard? And also its from a 80% lower.. does that cause any legal issues in shipping?

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Here's little tip about parallax adjustment. Or maybe you already know this.

There's a lot of people out there who defines parallax is to focus the picture in the scope. Well, it does that, too. But, having the picture focused is a byproduct of it not the objectivity.

Adjusting parallax is to have the target and the reticle on the same plain. You know that by nodding your head slightly and if you see the reticle remain on the target at stationary manner, then it's parallax free.

Now there's some catches here. You may find the parallax knob not indicating same number as actual distance of the target. Also, you may find that the picture of the view is not well focused either. As long as you acquired parallax free, these can happen and it's OK.

My eyes have suffered a lot of computer games, cell phone games and took some beating as a child and aged bit. I even have to dial down the reticle focus almost to the end of - side. Therefore, the picture won't be clear when the target is on the correct plain with each other. Something I have to live with it. Or.... I can just dial it until I can see the target clearly and make sure I am perfectly behind the scope by making sure I don't any sort of scope shadow, which is not that easy.
Yeah, I recon most that understand paralax and "side focus " as its sometime referred to know that its about getting the image on to the same plane.. like putting your thumb directly on the bullseye and moving your head or being 100 feet away and holding out your thumb to cover the bullseye, if you move your head you'll see a perspective change unlike with your thumb directly on the bullseye

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I think you misunderstood what parallax is. It has nothing to do with radius, objective lens size or what so ever.
Your objective lens radius has everything to do with the amount of paralax you have the potential to experience. I believe at 100 yard (assuming no factory paralax compensation built in) if you have a 50mm objective lense then you can have as much as 25mm of being off. At 200 yards it would be 50mm and so on.. i just don't remember if its the full diameter or just the radius that equals the potential paralax.

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Your objective lens radius has everything to do with the amount of paralax you have the potential to experience. I believe at 100 yard (assuming no factory paralax compensation built in) if you have a 50mm objective lense then you can have as much as 25mm of being off. At 200 yards it would be 50mm and so on.. i just don't remember if its the full diameter or just the radius that equals the potential paralax.

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Amount of parallax can be decided because of the magnification power not from the size of the objective lens. This is well known fact.
 
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