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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, I picked up a remington model 770 in 7mm remington mag for a great price. I have a vintage red field fixed 12x scope and I want to know if I can use that scope for the rifle? I know the rifle is entry level but I want I use what I have available to shoot out to a few hundred yards if possible with out spending money. Any help is appreciated.
 

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Hello all, I picked up a remington model 770 in 7mm remington mag for a great price. I have a vintage red field fixed 12x scope and I want to know if I can use that scope for the rifle? I know the rifle is entry level but I want I use what I have available to shoot out to a few hundred yards if possible with out spending money. Any help is appreciated.
Hi MoonDawgy,
I'll try to be as brief as I can, I have a tendency to get long winded. Especially considering, that your subject spans my two favorite topics..bolt action rifles, and Optics. ...see, my Google speech to text even capitalizes the word Optics.

Congratulations on your new find. So long as the RedField is in good working order, it would work just fine on that rifle. And would actually have a pretty long service life.. PROVIDING, that it is a specimen that maybe just had a service... They're are several legitimate arguments against it though.

Number one, the main opposition you're going to find with this, is eye relief... Does that RedField give enough eye relief to mount on that rifle? It doesn't have to be exact, just try to measure it, or have someone else measure it while you are on the rifle. I would think that you would need at least 3 in, preferably 3.5... but again, there's real no law in any book that will support this.

Number two, the thing about more vintage Optics is, you're not going to find any two of the same... They have all had very different lives, handled by very different owners, so they have all aged very differently. That RedField, technically, should be able to handle any recoil, that any scope today can... Period. BUT, again, age...

Number three, folks are going to argue, that your scope of choice, will have the propensity to let you down on a trophy... Because it's old, and it may take that moment to take a crap. Or, it may not.. they'll say, do you really want to risk a once in a lifetime animal on a vintage scope?

Number four, folks are going to tell you that the scope won't let you hunt as late or as early... Due to coatings, and their inability to gather as much light... or should I say, handle as much light.

Your reply may very well be, well I'm not going to be hunting with this rifle... I'll only be shooting..., Or doing utilitarian type work... And that response is perfectly valid...obviously.

Some folks might even be ugly to you, and pick on your rifle model, and say that they would not take the good name of RedField with a 770.... Or they may say something else about anything else you have to offer. And that's all it is, is pure ugliness... Don't listen to it, personally, I'm happy you found something that has made you happy.. I think it's cool that you have something to put on it as well.

Your biggest issue, with this scope and rifle combination is going to be eye relief.. now that's just a broad statement, it may very well be that that scope has four and a half inches of eye relief for all I know... But you want to make sure to check it out first.

Also, if you're going to be carrying this to any extent, maybe get that scope serviced at some point in time, by one of these aftermarket places like iron sights or whoever else may be offering services for RedField at the moment...

Lube the action up on that rifle pretty well, the bolt stop is weak. I had one in 300 mag... It was a rifle scope combo, and the scope that the factory provided with it punched me in the face. I never did much with the rifle... I'm a Tikka man myself...

Whatever you can do to get yourself out there, do it. GO OUTSIDE.

GOOD LUCK MoonDawgy..
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you very much for the reply rapidaffliction! For the most part this will be just a target shooting rifle and I wanted to use what I had available to keep costs down. I’m working on an older Weatherby Vanguard in 7mm mag so I’ll spend money on a scope for that. Here are few pictures of the Redfield if you are interested(the rings will be changed out)
Metal Pipe Bicycle part Magenta Cylinder

Camera accessory Camera lens Cameras & optics Bicycle part Material property

Camera accessory Plant Material property Cameras & optics Tints and shades
 

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WOW! That thing looks GREAT! I'm sort of jelly... That's real special scope. What's the third knob for? Is that parallax control, or a reticle change thing? What is the reticle? Is it RedFields ballistic reticle thingy? Do you know what size the objective is?

Does it look to have any dust in there?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The third knob is an adjustment for yardage. The 2 knobs are for wind age and elevation. Does not look like there is dust in there.the reticle is normal(no hold over hash marks). The objectives are 40 mm and 50 mm
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A friend of mine (that has since passed away) gave it to me when I used to have a Savage 30.06. It is missing the caps for the turrets but I have kept the covers on it and had it stored on an old scope box.
 

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Well. It sure is awesome. I don't think I've ever even seen one. I can't say enough about it. Depending on the year of your Vanguard...I would think about putting it on the Weatherby.

You may be able to find some caps somewhere, at some point in time.

RedField purchased the bearcub line from Kollmorgen... Those were great scopes. The RedFields were nice, as a result. I've always loved the way the ocular bell looks.

Thank you for sharing it with us.



Sound the Charge.
 

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Coolio. I look forward to seeing it. Oh, yeah.. I forgot, try to see if you can put the rings back in the same place... It may not work out for you like that, but I would try to keep them in the same place...if you had any doubts.
Ultimately, you'll have to go with whatever the architecture allows, and what is comfortable for your positioning... But, I would try to keep that scope as clean as possible...

Don't use your shirt tail to clean the lenses... I don't even use a cloth at all... INVEST IN A LENS PEN... It doesn't matter what brand, as long as it has the trademark LensPen, on it.... It has a little brush where you can brush off dust and dirt and debris, then it has a carbon tip, that gets off other stuff...God forbid, fingerprints, etc....

If you shine a flashlight into the ocular lens, where you place your eye... And then sort of look through the objective lens, you can get a better sense of what's in the scope... You can see whether there is any Haze on the back side of the lens, either from the seals being permeated and moisture being in there, or from the lubricants slowly evaporating over time, and leaving a more oily Haze on the backside of the lens... You may be able to see imperfections in the glass, such as little bubbles, all glass has this... You'll be able to see any improper cleaning marks...etc..

Avoid putting any solvents or abrasives on it. There's a lot of contested advice, about using windex, I have used Windex in the past, but it's probably not the best thing to use. Some solutions will be more potent than the other... For more stubborn dirt and grime, I typically use a drop of water, and although I have been getting paranoid about it, a q-tip... I think I'm going to stop doing that. So in the past, on caked on dirt, I would wet a q-tip with bottled water, and get the caked on dirt off, then take the dry side of the q-tip, and wipe it again, let it dry completely; then use the carbon tip of the lens pen, starting with circular motions in the center of the lens, working my way outwards. ... But I don't think I'm going to use a q-tip anymore.

The thing about using more abrasive items like that, is that some of the coatings on older Optics is more soft, than the newer ones.

I think a good cleaning solution, is the Gear Aid brand anti-fog/cleaning solution. But again, I'm really talking about heavy duty cleaning... AND, it's made in the United States of America. Really though, you should be good with a LensPen for all your cleaning needs. They also make different sizes and shapes. I have a regular sized one for the objective, and a smaller one; the mini-pro –for the ocular lens.

Probably before you mount this scope, you should set it to mechanical zero... You can do this by bottoming out, or nearly bottoming out the windage and elevation adjustments, one at a time; count the clicks all the way in the other direction, divide it in half and that should be mechanical zero. Then you do the same for the other adjustment. THEN, make two little saddles, out of cardboard... Remove those rings, place the scope, in the two v-shaped saddles (one at each/either end of the tube), looking through it...., Spin it in a steady circle. The center of the crosshair should remain perfectly still, in one position, as the reticle spins; if it does not –as in, if it rotates out of balance; then it's not mechanically zeroed... You would then just figure out what's needed to changed, to make to get it to get its center, to spin in a perfect circle...so, the reticle should spin in a balanced circle.

Once it has received a "factory reset" like this, then you would mount it and start your zeroing process on your rifle.

As far as that parallax yardage knob.... It may not be exactly on, if it's not; don't fret –a lot of Scopes are not exactly on, it's more of a suggestion, or a reference point.

I await final pics.

Good luck. Again.
 
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