Sniper & Sharpshooter Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Question about this. The first time I was out in the woods with my ghillie on a BDU jacket only (a year ago) after I got up from my position I looked behind me and saw all the grass trampled down and the area before that where I stalked. Its so obvious that someone was lieing in there heh. Once you are out of the AO and lets say the enemy was patrolling and they see that trampled grass and the trail leading to it, we all know what they'd do. But anyway do Snipers, Scout/Snipers, reconnaissance do anything about this? It always bugged my mind. Because personaly I don't want to leave any trail what so ever. I don't know my my instincts seem to be acute with tracking and counter-tracking.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,927 Posts
I would say pick a spot where you will leave the least amount of imprint, or where it would be hardest to see. A treeline with branches and leaves attached to them would be loud, but something quieter could work. Your colours should match grass, and unless you are stalking, in which case even slow movements won't be slow enough to leave a depressed area for long, don't be out in the open. I know just what you mean from deer beds.

If I were sniping, and I have no training in this but book learnin' and reading the works of Mel, et. al here at the forum, I would use what I know of hunting, and what I know from listening to the pros among us. Stay behind the treeline, not at the edge. Find a place to lay down that will give me the most shade as the sun moves, preferably behind something like a fallen log or a pine tree. Hopefully with something to rest my rifle on if I don't have a pod. It has to have a depression, or some way to make my retreat unseen though, and that is a problem in the grass. Anything I could crawl behind were the BGs couldn't see me.

I assume they would have a decent idea of where the shot came from cause my game past 600 M sucks, and that's when I shoot known. So I would assume the enemy does find my hide, but my getaway tracks should not be discernable, or so I would hope.

This isn't sniper related, and it's pretty back country, but I was taught as a kid to use a big, needly pine branch to sweep away tracks in grass and snow
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Muzzleblast said:
I would say pick a spot where you will leave the least amount of imprint, or where it would be hardest to see. A treeline with branches and leaves attached to them would be loud, but something quieter could work.
So if all possible be under the tree's so that their over hanging branches get most of my body coverd but use the colors of the grass to determine ghillie? Stay away from places that have vegitation very tall

Muzzleblast said:
I know just what you mean from deer beds.
Yes a few days ago I was going through the woods in these weeds that look like palms *if you go to church, Easter Sunday..those palms* and I saw a bunch of this stuff trampled. About the size of a kids bed. And I looked for the entrance and it was "sparatic" being which each footprint and where it landed.

Muzzleblast said:
I assume they would have a decent idea of where the shot came from cause my game past 600 M sucks, and that's when I shoot known. So I would assume the enemy does find my hide, but my getaway tracks should not be discernable, or so I would hope.
I'd hope so too heh. One time a few months ago I was UNDER a tree branch (about a football in width) and infront, and my sides were weeds up to my head. Behind my was a tree and even taller (like 8ft) weeds. When I got out you could clearly see the flatend weeds heh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
571 Posts
Unfortunately, there isn't that much you can do about it afterwards, unless you want to spend hours on bending it all back into shape :lol: And if you've been there for a while, there's a risk of it having been slightly miscoloured too. If you're going into areas with tall weeds etc, your best bet is to slowly and gently brush everything to the sides and up around you, forming a hide using the weeds themselves.

As for snow... forget it, you'll have to trust the wind etc. If you're skiing, you "migh" use a blanket dragged behind you to make the tracks harder to spot, but it's generally a waste of energy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,795 Posts
This is the reason trackers and tracker teams are the nemisis of snipers. You leave some type of trail that a good tracker can follow, and no matter what you leave scent a tracking dog can follow.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,927 Posts
Once you are done with a hide, that areas is of no use to you anymore I think, right? So while you're in it, you sure don't want it found, but so long as you aren't caught escaping, it doesn't really matter what it looks like I guess. Like Nek said, unless you bend up each weed and hold it until it sets again, it's going to look like you were laying in it.

If you stay in the hide and then observe, you're okay, the mission ends, and you leave. If you fire, everyone more or less knows a sniper is in the area, you sneak off, and the mission ends. All they find is an area that looks like someone (or two people) have been laying there for a while.

If it's going to be a long watch, I've seen manuals that describe constructing your hide by darkness, and involve some digging. That's gonna show when someone looks at it.

A sniper wouldn't go back to the same hide ever too, so if they find it, they can be proud, it's of no use to you anymore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
Muzzleblast wrote
A sniper wouldn't go back to the same hide ever too, so if they find it, they can be proud, it's of no use to you anymore
Muzz, you are voice of common sense - the point is stay undetected and leave undetected, not to preserve nature :lol:( just kidding, of course its better to leave least possible amount of tracks, but <see Nekekami's post>. :wink: ) I'd even suggest to put armed explosive as an extra bonus. It does not fit with modern rules of war (after all, you are leaving armed land mine behind), but it does work against amateur trackers. At least it worked against Chechen troops in Grozny, but, to tell you truth, I've never been tracked by counter-sniping team (though I worked IN one, and have deepest respect to tracking dogs ever since :wink:), or just was unaware of it...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Ok since leaves are being covered i have a similar issue as well. When out on a practice stalk we were in full ghillies and stalking through tall grass, about 2 feet high at some points down to 6 inches here and there. Well we had to stalk through enemy patrols. As my teamate and I get into position and start our over watch, we hear foot steps behind us then talking, it was the patrol walking up behind us. Well we were taken out. Later on i asked how they got to us, he says they followed a slight trail. Now keep in mind we did not take a direct route but more of a zigzag. Now a direct route would be easy to follow so i figured the zigzag would be better but of course we were found. Any suggestions for going through grass fields or similar areas.

P.S they only saw us because the paint had worn off the bottom of my boots, and they were black.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
571 Posts
It takes practice, practice and yet more practice. You have to get the grass to "flow" around you, and not damage it too much, i.e it should spring back up pretty quickly. As for zig-zag pattern, that doesn't necessarily help. Don't know the particulars about the grass you usually encounter, but for many types I've encountered, they kinda grow in natural "rows", due to wind etc(Though nothing as straight and easily noticeable as on a farmers fields). You get the best results if you walk along those rows, rather than cross them, due to the reasons I mentioned above. The trick is to notice the lay of the land.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
Avoid large grass-covered spaces by day, only cross them by night. Sounds too straightforward, but if there is slightest opportunity you're been tracked, grass will give you up. Grass is hard to blend in, it moves after gas blast from the muzzle... Though in our army, snipers are rarely assigned to the tasks that are common for US snipers (according to USMC sniper training manual), and when you cross front lines and "go hunting", you are usually free to choose the route. Personally I just avoided moving by day when going 100-300m from our defences, in both urban and rural areas
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
I live in the NW in Idaho so wind doesnt affect grass very much. So i guess next time ill have to look for an alternate over watch position, i only recall one other and the line up sucked.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top