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Hey everyone. Does anyone have any places or comments on how to do a proper glass bedding job? I looked around,. but nothing looks all that interesting.
 

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Well, since I personally bed all of the SC rifles, I have a little bit of experience doing them :D

Whatcha looking for? Its really not that hard to do (geez, I keep giving away all my secrets, pretty soon business is gonna dry up! :D )

The key is to properly over prepare and to stay on top of it.

MEL
 

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Well basically, im looking to do my first glass bed job on that McMillan A5 I have for the 700P. So far ive managed to figure out the tactical bolt knob installation (easy with a small lathe), but ive never seen it done....I was thinking of getting the video/material kit that brownells sells through AGI, but I wanted a second opinion.

And dont worry, I'm not trying to dry up your business, Im perfectly happy just working on my own stuff.....(Would just love to have that explained to me.)
 

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seeing it done on a video, along with written instructions would be 210% better than just being told. Seeing is believing! :lol:

But all-in-all, it is not hard. If you google it you will get many, many, many, many, online sites that have step by step instructions.
 

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Hey twist if you haven't already taken a whack at that bedding job I can break it down Barney style for you.
-first of all, prep the action, I like to fill all little holes, nooks and cranies with playdough to prevent locking the action to the stock. After that you need to apply the release agent, all over the action, the action screws and threads, all over the trigger and anywhere else you don't want this stuff.
-next, prep the stock, I really like to use dremel tools. dig out behind the barrel lug about a half inch, in front of it an around it. basically you want to remove as much all the material that touches the main contact points as possible. The spot where the back and front of the action are screwed down, the chamber area of the barrel is a good spot too, take your time. One trick I like is to router four or five groves down the barrel channel and fill them with glass, that prevents warped stocks from creating pressure points on barrels, mainly for wood though.
-Another little trick is to leave some small areas unroutered, right near the screw holes, that way you have an idea how much glass you need to put in and it prevents you from torquing your action in too far, you can always drill them out latter and glass it.
-once you start mixing, go ahead and make alot, its better to waste some then run out and have to scramble to mix some more, just gob it into place and spread it around, the extra will ooze into the magazine well as it tightens, make sure you leave out the mag, just carve out the glass later
-once it hardens pop the action out, it might take a bit, I like to slap the barrel, the vibration helps it loosen up.
-then go ahead and peel off all the release agent and carve off the excess.

the instructions that come with the stuff are okay, its not as hard as it sounds, it only takes me about 20 minutes to do a whole rifle. Its not a bad idea to practice on a old .22. Have fun
 

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In advance... i know some people see me as being "rude" some times... i dont mean to be. Im just very upfront about things. So dont take any of my questions the wrong way... :)

Poundcake said:
I like to fill all little holes, nooks and cranies with playdough to prevent locking the action to the stock
Are you serious :?: :| And just double checking... by "playdough" you mean the doughy stuff kids play with that comes in the yellow plastic containers in various colors that they sell at "Toys R' Us" :?: :|

1: Does the pillar/pillar's have severe pitting on it/them to where it would cause the glass bedding to hold it in place?
2: Do you eventually remove the "play-dough"?
3: The whole purpose of glass bedding an action into a stock is to ensure 100% even contact between the action and the stock... putting "play-dough" in "all little holes, nooks and cranies" would defeat the purpose. I guess what im getting at is... where did you hear of doing this "play-dough" thing because it just doesnt sound to smart to me.

*Dont get me wrong... ive heard of people filling in "pock marks" and things like that on pillars with glass... smoothing it over... then glass bedding it into the action. But ive never heard of any one doing this with "play-dough". After X amount of time... the play-dough would dry up and shrink anyway... sssoooo... i just dont see why any one would think of this. :| Maybe im wrong and its a well known thing... or possibly works. It just sounds like somthing the Japanese would have thought up during the last days of WW2... "last ditch" style...

BC
 

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I understand your concern BC,
-When I say playdough, I mean playdough. You are not quite catching how it is used, on most actions there are holes, grooves, and various ledges that if the glass filled in, would "lock" the action into the stock. the playdough is a temporary filler that can be easily removed. I don't know if the Japanese invented this technique, but if they did I am amazed they lost :lol:
-As far as pillars are concerned they are often times intentionally grooved so they will lock in place, I didn't bring them up because a proper bedding job will often negate there usefullness.
-I hope that clears it up. I wish I had some pictures to show you because it really isn't some crackpot scheme.
 

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Clears everything up...

BC
 

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Brownell's has a got set of directions..

Look around in their Tech Notes section (I think it's a "Webbench" article. Course, they recommend a lot of stuff from them.
 

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I have never glass bedded anything.

But, I read somewhere that when you bed a rifle, make sure to coat all the metal parts thoroughly using paste wax. This ensures that your action does not stick to the stock.

Like I said, I have never glass bedded anything. But the paste wax tip seems to make sense to me.

And were I to attempt glass bedding, I'd buy an accraglass kit from Brownells. And if I needed any help, (beyond the supplied instructions) I'd call Brownells gunsmith help line.

Mad.
 

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I use Pam cooking spray or the gereric version to coat the action parts.
 

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I've heard that when bedding a savage action, it is important to free float the rear of the action around the tang safety. Why is that? Does this rule apply to all rifle bolt actions?
 

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Welcome to the forum, Mr. Wiggle. Please note that this thread has been dead since 2005, and none of the posters you see here are still around.

That being said, yes, the Savage needs the tang floated. It doesn't bolt up through the tang like a Remington, and all the tang does is support the trigger group, so there is no benefit to bedding it. As for any benefit to specifically FLOATING the tang..well, I can't say.
The one I did--a long time ago, mind you--shot fine bedded, and shot fine floated.

But no, the rule most DEFINITELY does not apply to all actions. If you don't know the differences, then either ask, or don't do your own bedding.

-Nate
 
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