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I think I rember seeing a some thread around here about this movie, but I could not find it. Any way, they have the trailer out (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1374069&sdm=web&qtw=480&qth=300. Looks good to me, and I like the sound track off the trailer. It is based off of the book, but does't seem like any one is too shure how closley related the two are....

"Jarhead" (2005)
Jarhead follows Swoff, a third-generation enlistee, from a sobering stint in boot camp to active duty, sporting a sniper's rifle and a hundred-pound ruck on his back through Middle East deserts with no cover from intolerable heat or from Iraqi soldiers, always potentially just over the next horizon.
 

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sounds like a good movie :)
 

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Sniper carrying a hundred pound ruck?
 

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12twist: If you're out on a three-week patrol, a 45kg rucksack isn't exactly uncommon, though I personally pack somewhat lighter.

Edited because I got his name wrong
 

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just how close to the book does it stay? cause i read the book and i personally really liked the book... "like all good Marines, i hated the Marine Corps." lol, sometimes it is hard to not agree. but i hope the movie is as good as the movie...
 

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re

How are you supposed to be stealthy with 100 pounds on your back?

Do you have a picture of yourself Nekekami, in ghuille and full pack?
 

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Re: re

Yimmy said:
How are you supposed to be stealthy with 100 pounds on your back?
Yimmy, a 100 lb. rucksack is a standard combat load for our infantryman. If you're a RTO, SAW assistant gunner, or carry a 90mm Recoiless Rifle or DRAGON(both weapons out-dated now), you're carring alot more! And to think they call it "Light" Infantry :roll: I had the misfortune of being a 90 gunner at one time, and believe me, it REALLY SUCKED humping that thing through the bush!!! Jumping with that thing was no fun, either, even though we had the "cut-down" version!
 

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Lonewolf, I can imagine! If your A-gunner had to carry the briefcases of two rounds, it must have been a joy for him too. Some of my friends have been Carl Gustav gunners at some point, which we still use, and I have heard how "fun" it is to be that thing's personal transport system. Supposed to be it came in handy for cave work in Afghanistan, but it sure must be hard to carry. They use it at the section (squad) level, with a "lightweight" one for light infantry, and specialized bunker buster shells.

What kind of 90 did you guys use?



 

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Muzzleblast said:
Lonewolf, I can imagine! If your A-gunner had to carry the briefcases of two rounds, it must have been a joy for him too. Some of my friends have been Carl Gustav gunners at some point, which we still use, and I have heard how "fun" it is to be that thing's personal transport system. Supposed to be it came in handy for cave work in Afghanistan, but it sure must be hard to carry. They use it at the section (squad) level, with a "lightweight" one for light infantry, and specialized bunker buster shells.

What kind of 90 did you guys use?



Muzz, in the early 80's we were still using the M67 Recoilless Rifle. Some units were using the DRAGON, which was a real POS! Although the 90's were heavy,around 38 lbs with each round weighing between 7 to 9 lbs, and were a pain to hump around, they are some MEAN mamma-jammers! I would hate to be on the recieving end! Especially with the antipersonnel (flechette) round! I think they were phased out somewhere in the late 80's for the M3 Carl Gustav.
 

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100lb ruck, absolutely, just as Nek said. Remember, you are not in a FFP or stalking 100% of the time. Just like everyone else, we are infantry, we set up patrol bases, use ORP's, etc. We will cache our rucks and then move into the active AO from there, etc etc etc. But we have to carry our food, water, etc just like everyone else.

MEL
 

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Yimmy:

As others have said, 45kg packs are fairly standard for non-mechanized infantry going out on patrols/combat operations.

The poor guys who carry the RB56 Bill 2 ATGM's are the ones I feel really sorry for... Total weight of the system with 1 missile is 34.5kg. 43.5kg if the night guidance system is used. Each extra robot tube weighs 20.9kg

Btw. No pics. Order from the officer responsible for unit security, since we store weapons, ammo etc at home(He retires in two years, I hope the new one will allow us to...). Also, no pics from Sierra Leone, because we've been working together with the spec ops teams.
But I don't use a ghillie as such anymore. I use a Saab Barracuda SOTACS.
 

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Ok guys lets actually think here. We all know that you cant stalk for crap if you have a 100 lb pack. What they mean by this probually is the deployment process and going from point a to point b with a larger force untill he has orders given to do his job.

Mel said it perfectly.

About the "light infantry". Its called that because they don't rely on many motorized vehicals. Compare a famous light infantry unit (75th Ranger Regiment) to mechanized infantry. Disregard the fact they are Special Operators and just think how they operate in conventinal warfare to the soldiers of mechanized units. "Do more with less" - Light Infantry
Thats just how I think.
 

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jc71corvette said:
Ok guys lets actually think here. We all know that you cant stalk for crap if you have a 100 lb pack. What they mean by this probually is the deployment process and going from point a to point b with a larger force untill he has orders given to do his job.

Mel said it perfectly.

About the "light infantry". Its called that because they don't rely on many motorized vehicals. Compare a famous light infantry unit (75th Ranger Regiment) to mechanized infantry. Disregard the fact they are Special Operators and just think how they operate in conventinal warfare to the soldiers of mechanized units. "Do more with less" - Light Infantry
Thats just how I think.
Well aware of the definition of "light infantry", jc. Been there, Done that. From an infantryman's point of view, "light infantry" is the biggest oxymoron there ever was! Notice the rolling eye's icon in my previous post.
 

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re

I know what infantry can be expected to carry, what I was unsure about was a snipers load.

I don't really see the point in a sniper carrying so much, it destroys their purpose. Any trained soldier can do patrols.
 

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Re: re

Yimmy said:
I know what infantry can be expected to carry, what I was unsure about was a snipers load.

I don't really see the point in a sniper carrying so much, it destroys their purpose. Any trained soldier can do patrols.
Yimmy, I've never been a sniper, but I'm sure they carry the standard infantryman's load PLUS their sniper gear and weapons. They are always infantry FIRST! I'm sure Mel or one of the other snipers here can elaborate more on what they carry and when, when they make their "transition" from infantry to sniper.
 

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i'm regular anti-armor assaultman (0351) in the USMC - and yes, "light infantry" is a serious officers joke!!! but for other sniper gear - radio, extra medical supplies, extra basics... onces make pounds, and pounds kill. I worked as a Designated Marksmen for FAST Co in Iraq, and over there we were responsible for a radio, extra batteries, extra water, chows, any weather specific gear, optics - day and NVGs, and then the basics... rifle, bag, ammo, more ammo, basic infantry equipment (tape, 550 cord, zip ties and such). so ya, no one on the lines has it good.... why i believe tracks is where all the "good times" are at - just tie your pack to the outside and roll. :x just my 2 cents... if there are any flames off this - you gotta wait a couple weeks for a response, my company is about to do a field op for a while... get a little bush time. talk to ya then.
 

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What is it like for a 2nd Lt. of an Infantry company in Iraq right now--does he get plenty of 'action' so to speak?

Scatch Maroo
 

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2nd Lieutenants usually arnt commanding Infantry Companies unless the Company Commander, executive officer and any other 1st Lieutenants have been killed... possible if theres a damn good sniper messing up thier AO but it doesnt happen that often
sometimes a 1st Lieutenant will be given a Company but they are usually promoted to Captain quickly after
Lieutenants are usually Platoon Leaders
 

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We've developed a few tactics for sniper teams to work as a fire support element in a platoon both defensively and offensively, and we've used it to good effect, more so defensively than offensively. Of course, our platoons defensive role is to roam the surrounding area in long-duration patrols, outside the inner defense perimeter, acting as early-warning or hammers if they slip past us, using the inner defenses as the anvil.

To list what I carry into the field for a long-duration patrol:

Rifle, bipod+5 spare magazines: 8.9kg
MP5SD+Susat+3 magazines: 4.6kg
SAAB Barracuda SOTACS, no pouches or foliage added: 2.9kg
Radio: 700g
Binoculars: 600g
Knife: 250g
Water: 3kg straight just here
Food: 5+kg here depending on what type of rations.
Spare socks, underwear and shirts: 1-1.5kg
Hygien gear
Minor medical supplies
NV gear
Flashlight
Batteries, batteries, batteries
Map+Compass(Never forget this, always know how to use it. Blind reliance on tech such as GPS will get you killed if you go up against high-tech opponents. GPS uses radio, and all radio can be jammed, no matter how many sources you try to grab the signal from.)
Poncho/wind break+blanket

That's just some stuff, most of it necessary actually. Unlike what you think, Yimmy, not all sniper work consists of just a few days of going in, doing the task and then getting out. It works in some cases, but can also fail spectacularly. Some of the most effective sniping during WW2 for example was done on real long-duration patrols by Finnish, Russian and German snipers. They went in and stayed behind enemy lines for weeks, engaging priority opportunity targets. The British didn't engage in that as much, and neither did the US, both having comparatively(keep this word in mind before you react) weak grasps of sniper tactics and its strategic use, though the tools were available.
 
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