Sniper & Sharpshooter Forums banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Laser range finders claim a high degree of accuracy. But I get the idea they're not even considered for sniping.

Why?

Are they detectable from down-range? As in a visible red dot or something that could be seen by the target?

Or detectable with some equipment?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,268 Posts
I'm not sure of the "sniping" you are talking about. However, in long range shooting, an accurate LRF has its place. There are only a few models that can consistently range a man-sized target to 1000yds, so it isn't something most shooters are wanting to spend $800 to $1000 purchasing.

The beam is not detectable by the target, but rather moving the exposed lenses around can get you busted by reflection in certain setups.

Most shooters also spend most of their time shooting at known-distance targets. Negates the money spent again.

I spend most of my time shooting at animals and steel of unknown distance. Therefor a LRF is quite handy, but I certainly don't rely 100% on it. I can make a good guess on most stuff out to 400-500yds. After that, I'm damn good at milling things. However, if I have time and the situation allows, I will use the LRF. Prior to getting my newest set of bushnell fusion arc 1600's I used a bushnell monocular that rarely hit anything past 500-600yds, and bright sunny days would reduce it even further. My fusion's seem to be ridiculously better.

So, as technology advances, the usefulness of the gear gets better and better. Don't get complacent and rely on it as your only means of ranging a target though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
As for the type of sniping, I'm talking about military usage.

So ... beyond 5-600 yards, they don't work that great? That would stink, as within that range you really get a higher margin of error on ranging anyway.

You also make it sound as though they're slower than figuring with a mil-dot or other range-finding reticle. Did I understand that correctly?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,268 Posts
I never said milling is faster, I simply said to not rely 100% on technology.

As it pertains to military usage, they are trained with both, as LRF will not work in certain situations.

I also did not say that all LRF do not work over 5-600yds. I said that the lower model bushnell I had did not. My fusion arc 1600's will range IPSC steel to 1200yds. Perhaps farther, but thats the farthest I've run them so far. They didn't have a problem ranging my neighbors house at 1790.

Please slow down and read my posts more carefully. If you want to learn, I have no problem spending time answering questions, but only if you are willing to apply yourself a little bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,206 Posts
They are tools. LRF certainly have a place in ones kit. Understanding some of the basics lets things become very clear. For most military applications the spotter makes a range card and then uses this for reference. However a LRF does offer some disadvantages. They laser is detectable provided someone else has the technology. Certain LRF use lasers with wavelengths that are detectable using night vision equipment, however most military units are not built this way.

When it comes to accuracy of the unit it depends on several things. Mainly beam divergence. To get the best accuracy you are going to pay for it. 1500 yard capable units are easy and cheap enough. However further then that and you are talking about some serious coin that most shooter aren't willing to pay for.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Stillriding

·
Registered
Joined
·
280 Posts
I have one of those Leopold 1200 yard (forgot the model, its out in the shop) It dosnt work very well at that distance but its pretty accurate to 600-700 yards.

I'm not in the game any more but I still play, and playing with the range finder is fun. I like to range something, then walk it off with a GPS, either both are broke or its like I said, accurate to about 700 yards.

Mine has other fetures. It measures angles and computes actual or angel distances. It also had a means to put in your caliber (preprogramed) and based on sighting in at 200 yards tells you how much hold over/under you need in MOA. Its pretty accurate with my 270, 257, 223 and 308 loadings..

Its also 8X so it makes a pretty compact Mono. For me it would be a waste of time using it for ranging animals because I dont believe I ever shot a game animal over 300 yards. I do range my horses and deer in my back pasture and the neighbors cows.

Like I said I'm not in the game, but I'm in the playing (retired) stage of my life and my Leopold range finder is a lot of fun to play with. I have used it to measure the height of the ridge behind my house, ranging the base and top and doing that A squared-B squared = C squared deal. Then confired the elevation with my GPS. (I wanted to figure the hight so I didnt over shoot it playing with my 45-70 BP rifle to get sight settings for a 1 Mile Match).

When I was in the game, I used the Stadium Lines on the ART Scope on the M-21, I got pretty good with that. I haven't played with Mil Dots that much, but using the range finder to check Mil Dots and visa versa is handy.

If you are in the Sniper Game for the Army, they'll fix you up with the training and equipment you need. If you are into LE Counter Sniping, you dont have distance to worry about.

If you want to PLAY (like me) then by all means get a Range Finder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
361 Posts
i dont know about today but when i went through in 2001, laser rangefinders w ere not allowed. they wanted you to learn to range using the issued mil-dot scope. range finders are used by today's combat snipers but are not concidered to be replacements for basic mil-dot ranging methods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Military Spec LRF's are incredibly accurate.

Check out the Leica Vectronix on the internet and you will see a set of binicular LRF's that will give you accurate ranging +- 1 m out to about 5,000mtrs.

Yep, everyone should learn to use their mildots and practice range estimation all the time, but with the top notch gear you can quickly identify and range a target in seconds.

The only downside is that this quality LRF costs about $15,000.oo USD. (No, i didn't add too many zeros).

For actual operations, you will find its rare to shoot more than 600metres.

A lot of guys get bushnells or Leupolds for the short range stuff to double check as they are little and portable.

LRF use will show up on passive or infra red NVG systems, so using them at night or even in the day can give your position away.

Cheers,
QM
 
  • Like
Reactions: Stillriding

·
Registered
Joined
·
514 Posts
sniper762 said:
i dont know about today but when i went through in 2001, laser rangefinders w ere not allowed. they wanted you to learn to range using the issued mil-dot scope. range finders are used by today's combat snipers but are not concidered to be replacements for basic mil-dot ranging methods.
battery's go dead more than a sniper would like I'm sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
As quiteman has said if you use the top end kit it is good. I have a set of Newcon LRB 4000 CI and found them great. I have take readings with them from my front deck of my house to a mobile phone tower that i can see and get a reading to it of 2875 metres and when checked by GPS they match. I have also used them while hunting and got range reading to things like large trees to in excess of 1500 metres.
Also part of the standard kit for snipers in the Australian Army are the top end Leica LRF binos
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Orkan

How do you like that Bushnell Fusion 1600? I have been looking at them for a while and they look like a good next step. I'm tried of switching back and forth between binos and my Bushnell 1500 ARC.
What did you pay?
Thanks, Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,268 Posts
Paid 750 if memory serves.

They are quite good for the money spent. They haven't let me down yet. The real test will be how they behave in the sub-zero temps up here in south dakota. Electronics often get sluggish or plain stop working when its cold out.

Otherwise they are excellent for the money spent. The swarovski model is a monocular, and is less than half the weight... but for the extra $250, I'll take the binocs and a 1lb penalty. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Mele can get me a pair for about $750. I am just about ready to pull the trigger.... This helps. Thanks for quick reply.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I am a Newbie to all this..Just ordered my first rig from Mel, Thank you all for the great info. :D
 
  • Like
Reactions: Stillriding

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,268 Posts
Welcome! Big mistake... you'll be broke for the rest of your life now! haha

Precision shooting is probably the most addictive sport on earth. Well, for me anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Yes Sir..it started with Black Rifles :shock: ....then training...then GLOCKS...more training...and one night I attended a PR lecture given by a retired military now LEO Sniper who does training out of the local gun store...and after the first hour I was HOOKED!!!! :lol:
So here I am! :wink:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Stillriding

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,239 Posts
This is an old thread...but still relevant non the less.

I have the elite 1600. It works great to about 600 yards on normal sized torso targets. Much past 600 and it is hit or miss.

Now it will range buildings and trees much farther than 600...but will not pick the plate out in an open field. The bushnel elite is ok for the price...but it is not truly a reliable 1000 yard rangefinder.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Stillriding
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top