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What is a good laser range finder at a reasonable cost? I archery hunt, and something that goes to 800-1000 yards real world would be nice. While I would like to think it is a toy, i need one since my range estmation sucks.
 

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Thanks for the spec sheet link.Gives me a place to start. How do the Bushnells hold up? How do they do in rain, adverse weather etc. Anyone used any of these? Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Never mind, I just read the writing at the top. Well no one ever accused me of being a genious.
 

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or a genius either....lol
 

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The bushnell's have been surprisingly good. The 1000 model has about the strongest laser of the "affordable" LRF's. On a reflective target they'll go 1200. Non reflective you are looking in the high 600s. They have been decent in the rain and other conditions.

The new leupolds have been very very solid, but their laser is not as strong.

I'd serious look at the Lieca's if you can afford them... they are very high quality also, and they make a 900 and 1200 model.

MEL
 

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This is an extract from another forum on the same topic.

Some serious long range shoothers in the US are using exRussian military laser rangefinders, these are awsome bits of gear and range out to 20000meters.



The unit is military specs binocular intended for ground surveillance, observation of individual targets and measurement of distance up to 20 km. The range finder with the optional angular mount is designed for referencing targets coordinates, and is capable of:

- Measuring the distance to the target;
- Measuring horizontal angles and magnetic azimuths;
- Measuring vertical angles and angles of elevation;
- Determination of target and landmark polar coordinates

SPECIFICATIONS:

Aiming Device:
Magnification, x 7
Field of View 7°
Range Finder:
Range, m 100 -19995
Range Accuracy, m ±5
Transmitter:
Wavelength, nM 1.06
Output Energy, mJ 15
FEATURES: Pulse width, nS 6
Up to 20 km distance Beam Divergence, mR 0.6
1st or last target selection Battery 9V
Illumination for dark conditions Dimensions, mm 225x 215 x 110
Digital data output Weight without battery, g 2.500

Pretty awsome hey. Very Happy Shocked

But more realistically the :

Swarovski Guide (USD$800)




Optics:

* Monocular SLC 8x30 optical system w/ SWAROBRIGHT
* Maximum range up to 1500 yds.
* Accuracy = +/- 1 yd
* Laser : Eye-safe Class 1 laser hazard classification
* Scan mode
* 30mm viewing optics
* 30mm receiving optics
* Dioptric eye correction +/- 4 diopters
* Adjustable twist-in eyecup, allows eyeglass-wearers a full field of view and can be removed for cleaning

Design:

* Compact, ergonomic and lightweight
* Weight: 12.36 oz
* Dimensions: 4.7"x3.5"x1.6"
* LED display with aiming circle for rapid target acquisition
* Battery lifetime: minimum 1000 measurements
* Operating temperatures: 14F to 122F
* Tripod connection
* Carrying strap
* Yards or meters readout selector
* Waterproof to 13 ft

Leica Rangemaster 1200 scan (USD$530)



Features of the Leica LRF Rangefinders include.....

* 7X Magnification
* F.O.V. Of 336 Ft @1000 Yds
* Range LRF 1200 11-1200 Yds
* Will Range In Yards or Meters
* Accuracy of +/- 1 Yd
* Weight 11 Ounces
* Dimensions 3.8X 3.9X 1.4 Inches
* Black Case & Neck Strap

Im leaning towards the Sawovski due to the fact that they are waterproof.
 

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Nikon Monarch Laser 800

Just picked up a Nikon Monarch Laser 800 range finder this afternoon. In the under $1k price range, the store had a selection of Bushnell and Nikon models. The two least expensive Bushnells had that Cracker Jacks box plastic feel and appearance, while the 3rd Bushnell model was certainly solid, but it was twice the size of any of the other models and more than twice the weight. The less expensive of the two Nikon models also suffered from toy store quality plastic enclosure, but the other Nikon model had a very nice rubberized coating. And while easily fitting in one hand, it managed to feel both solid and lightweight at the same time. On the basis of looks/feel/ease of carry, the Nikon 800 was the clear winner and a good deal at under $350.

The Nikon 800 works with the common two button operation: you press one button to cycle through the various "modes" and press the other button to acquire a distance reading. Once you've set the mode to the setting you prefer, you don't need to worry about that button again until you decide to change modes. From that point on, operation is an incredibly simple one-push action. Pull the range finder out of your pocket, point it at the target, push the "Power" button and read the range. Eight seconds after you release the power button, the unit shuts itself off. That's about as simple and "idiot-proof" as anything could be.

I was also attracted by the Nikon's 6x image magnification; this meant that what I saw through the range finder didn't differ too greatly from what I saw through my Leupold 6x fixed mag rifle scope. I've still got 9 days to wait until I can pick up my new Remington 700 CDL, but assuming I pass the background check, I think that the Leupold scope and Nikon rangefinder will both work well together and with the 700 CDL. None of those three items are top of the line units, but they all seem like dependable, strong performing tools at reasonable prices. I'm looking forward to seeing if they all fit together as well as I hope. They do offer a helluva lot of performance at a price range well within reach of anyone with at least a few bucks to spend. I can't wait to get them all out to the range - goddamn 10 day waitig period!
 

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Yep, that was what I was asking about. That was my biggest gripe about the Lieca 1200, it was not tribpod mountable and I could not hold it steady enough otherwise to range on anything man or animal size over about 600.

MEL
 

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heheeh... as if the LRF wasn't expensive enough, now you have to buy one of their expensive tri-pods and adaptor :wink:

I wasn't aware of the adaptor, thank you for posting it

MEL
 

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laser range finder

I just bought the bushnell elite 1500. I been able to range trees at 1104 yds. Thats the farthest object I been able to range. I live in califonia and we just had some very strong storms come thru, even in the heaviest downpours it would range to the farthest object at the time which was a palm tree, at around 640yds. Ive tried it in fog which I found if it was thick enough were the object looked blurry and a little bit concealed it would not range. but if was light and sparadic i was able to range objects to about 500 yrds. It about the same i would get with the geovid That my friend has in the same type of condition.
Another thing i like is the feautre mode called bullseye which tell you when it is ranging two objects and it is choosing the closest one. Also it had a brush mode that will tell you it is using this application. It also has a scan mode where you hold the buttong down and it will tell you distance of diffrent objects that you move onto.
The optics view is good (not great as I'm spoiled and have some great european binos) but for it small size i was suprised that it gathered a fair amount of light and should good detial in dark conditions it is 7x. It also can be used on a tripod. It is a very compact as it lengh is under 6 inches and about 3 1/2 inch wide.
The only thing I have a beef with is its internal green light that's soppose to light up the lcd in dark enviorments doesnt seem to work. you see a sliver of green on the bottom of the lens but does not light up the lcd. Other then that I'm very happy with it so far. I bought it for $336.00 on amazon.com
leopould has a range finder that looks promising that you can compute the round you're using into it and it will tell you're ballistic range. by calculating the incline and line of sight range to the target and then computing you're rifle or bows ballistic range. I would think it would work as describe as leopuld makes some great products. IT only range's to 800 yds So there is range finders that range longer. I would love to hear if anyone has tried this one yet.
 

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I have a nikon 800m rangefinder. From my back deck i can range a watertower thats 824.5yds away!!! I also used it for deer hunting and target shooting and it helps me out toooooo much!!! Great optics for a reasonable price.


dom
 

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There are 4 versions of the new leupold LRF. The largest of which will range to 1500. I plan to review one fairly soon

MEL
 

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Eka I have a Leica 800 and I reallly like it.
 

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Why a separate range finder? There are scopes with a built-in range finder. Mel is even selling them (don't ask the price). Are they of low quality or just too expensive?
 

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Well, the big reason was up until this year (with the introduction of the burris scope with LRF) the Swarvski (sp?) was the only option, and I believe they even quit building that one. The price on the Swar was about $2500.

The other reason is that the LRF's in these scopes (Burris included) are not as powerful. I believe the burris is effective on a reflective target up to 800 yards and 500 or less on a non reflective target. The seperate units go up to 1500

MEL
 
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