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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings. I'm new to this forum, and I like it.

Anyone use / have experience with the Leatherwood equipment?

I use a Sheperd on my hunting rifle. It's fast, but perhaps not quite right for precision shooting at the gun club. I have been reading up on the mil-dot system, and am fascinated with the function and utility it offers. However, although it is the best system for most operators, I am inclined to a scope with features that requires less mathematics.

Any input on Leatherwood or a similiar rangefinding scope will be much appreciated.

Bern
 

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The old leatherwood scopes (as used on the Army ART-I and ART-II scopes) were good. The new stuff is NOT good. The original reticule worked well, and was effective. As was the original USMC redfield accu-range scopes. There are a few others that are around that might work well for you also. The mil-dots are math intensive, but it still might be useful to you.

any scope that has a reticle (duplex even) of known sizes can be used much like the ART system of old. If you know the thin part is suppose to cover 30 MOA, you can just zoom in your scope until it covers 30" on the target, then look at the zoom power. Take the power times 100 and you have the range to the target in yards.

MEL
 

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Discussion Starter #3
mele said:
The old leatherwood scopes (as used on the Army ART-I and ART-II scopes) were good. The new stuff is NOT good. The original reticule worked well, and was effective. As was the original USMC redfield accu-range scopes. There are a few others that are around that might work well for you also. The mil-dots are math intensive, but it still might be useful to you.

any scope that has a reticle (duplex even) of known sizes can be used much like the ART system of old. If you know the thin part is suppose to cover 30 MOA, you can just zoom in your scope until it covers 30" on the target, then look at the zoom power. Take the power times 100 and you have the range to the target in yards.

MEL
Thank you Mel! Now that is very cool to know.

I've been reading Maj. Plaster's book, and he makes no specific mention of thet technique.

I realize utilizing math in performing accurate bullet placement is a necessary. Hey, this is a thinking mans sport!

I am leaning towards the Leupold, with a BDC. That may fit the bill.

Any other paticular BDC equpped scopes that you are fond of Mel?

Thank you in advance. :D
 

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Gebirgsjager said:
I realize utilizing math in performing accurate bullet placement is a necessary. Hey, this is a thinking mans sport!
Crap. I may have bit off more than I can chew.
 

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spade said:
Yes, this is a great alternative to add a BDC to just about any scope with target knobs.

Kahles, Zeiss, Swarv, S&B, and a few other european scope makers have BDC's available. But not many american/japanese scopes do. Some cheap tasco's (don't touch them) and old redfields do... but quality is a problem. (at least on the tasco's)

MEL
 
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