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Discussion Starter #1
Have been thinking of getting a Winchester Stealth II as a second project rifle. I have heard winchesters refered to as having slower "lock time". Could someone please explain this?
Thanks
 

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I think thats the time gap in between the trigger being pulled, and the weapon firing
 

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Blast has it right, it is the time between the release of the firing pin by the trigger being pulled to the firing pin striking the primer. Somewhere we've got another thread on this topic. Its not really a releveant factor with any rifle unless you are doing a lot of offhand work. If so, then portions of seconds can make a difference.

JeffVN
 

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Jeffvn said:
of offhand work.
JeffVN
Is 'offhand' work a type of position, or some sort of competition term?

Scatch Maroo
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes this iis a type of position. Normally when you are standing and shooting with no rests.
 

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Another issue would be if your shooting a small moving target, say the base of the spinal column mabye. Mostly a law enforcement in hostage situation type thing.
 

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to simplify, you want as little time between when you pull the trigger and when the firing pin strikes the primer. The shorter the time, the less chance the rifle gets to move. Remington has excellent lock time, but others do also. Quick lock time "helps" with accuracy, and where needed I use a heavier firing pin sping on my rifles to help reduce lock time even a little bit more. Titanium firing springs (for light weight) and other things are done by the bench rest guys to help reduce lock time even more. Its a bit spendy, but for them, worth it.

MEL
 

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I would not worry about locktime.

It only matters at the highest levels of competition. Mauser rifles have a relatively slow locktime, however a good Mauser will still shoot more accurately that you can.

And with the greatest of respect, I say avoid titanium. It wears faster than steel. In the long run, you are better off with steel firing pins and triggers.

Mad
 

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I would not worry about locktime.

It only matters at the highest levels of competition. Mauser rifles have a relatively slow locktime, however a good Mauser will still shoot more accurately that you can.
i agree dont worry about it unless your doing some bench rest competitions

And with the greatest of respect, I say avoid titanium. It wears faster than steel. In the long run, you are better off with steel firing pins and triggers.

Mad
titanium wearing faster than steel?
titanium firing pins are marketed the other way around and also marketed for faster lock time neither i worry much about so i have never tried them
 

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I thought about titanium until I read the Brownells catalogue. They specifically stated therein that titanium parts would wear faster.

The light weight of titanium can result in a lighter trigger pull, but the part will wear faster.

Mad
 

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titanium is harder and more resistant to the elements
should last longer but even though i still think this ill be keeping my proven steel firing pins ;)
 
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