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Man.... you have a lot in your mind regarding a loctite, huh....

I just keep it simple by being not hesitated to be using blue locktite on ring screws. Above was way too much of science for what we are doing, I think... If otherwise, accept my apology.
 
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I like it.
 

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So, you can generally reduce the fastener recommended torque value by 20% when using red or blue Loctite regardless of bolt diameter? I wouldn't expect that relationship to be linear.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Yup. Buy the Torgue program if it's such a critical application and you want to calculate to the nats. For a rifle, that's close enough.

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
 

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That's good info. To think I have been torquing wrong all these years. BTW that Wheeler FAT Wrench is awesome for anyone who does small fastener torquing.
 

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I just spoke with tech support at Vortex last week and they strongly advise to not use locktite on rings due to the increase in today's values. You can damage your scope.
 

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That's good info. To think I have been torquing wrong all these years. BTW that Wheeler FAT Wrench is awesome for anyone who does small fastener torquing.
The fat is ok. Fix it sticks and seekonk are awesome. Fat is worth the money...but is not on the same level as the others. If you want real world data to back this up let me know.
 

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Related discussion at the range last Friday regarding everyone's obsession with torque on rifles and scopes.

Main question was "How did we survive all these years without Inch/Pound torque wrenches and just had to rely on the spring of an 'L-shaped' allen wrench with our finger tip on it?"

The common allen wrench has different lengths. Short for small fasteners, long for larger fasteners. When the wrench just starts to flex a little with your finger pad on the end, both the flex and pain in your finger tip indicate when you have the right torque :cool:

Of course that usually doesn't satisfy the OCD in most of us now, does it.;)
 

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Related discussion at the range last Friday regarding everyone's obsession with torque on rifles and scopes.

Main question was "How did we survive all these years without Inch/Pound torque wrenches and just had to rely on the spring of an 'L-shaped' allen wrench with our finger tip on it?"

The common allen wrench has different lengths. Short for small fasteners, long for larger fasteners. When the wrench just starts to flex a little with your finger pad on the end, both the flex and pain in your finger tip indicate when you have the right torque :cool:

Of course that usually doesn't satisfy the OCD in most of us now, does it.;)
The thing is...what might work and what is right are often two different things. You are welcome to rely on "ouch" to determine torque value...but I have seen several people trash high dollar scopes from tightening the rings too tight. I have actually seen people trash scopes by using sub-par torque wrenches as well (not the fat) and simply trusting them to work right.

I have too much money in my equipment to rely on "ouch" to make sure that I stop in time...and still get it tight enough. It doesn't make sense not to have a good set of torque wrenches when you are talking about the kind of money that we spend on gear.
 

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It doesn't make sense not to have a good set of torque wrenches when you are talking about the kind of money that we spend on gear.
I certainly don't disagree but I'm old enough to remember when they just didn't exist at any price an average shooter could afford. The heart of my post was nostalgic, recalling a time when people had to rely on common sense and a reasonable level of skill.

Like they say, "Common Sense isn't all that Common anymore". ;)


BTW, I have approximately 7 torque wrenches of various types and ranges and with various costs. At one time I had one that fit on a standard square drive handle and read torque values directly into a computer. A little expensive at just under $2,000 but it sure was accurate. It was used to evaluate torque wrenches companies tried to sell to my company.
 

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Wow, thanks for the research. I use the blue loc-tite as well. Its the same stuff we use for a giant shredding machine at work. I've never thought about using anything else because I've never had issues with it.
 
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