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I'm looking for a round to use in the northern Yukon's for hunting Moose and Grizzly bear at 800 to 1300 yards. But will not blow out all the meat or back side of the exit wound like a 50 cal.
 

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I'm looking for a round to use in the northern Yukon's for hunting Moose and Grizzly bear at 800 to 1300 yards. But will not blow out all the meat or back side of the exit wound like a 50 cal.
hunting Moose and Grizzly bear at 800 to 1300 yards. Why, such a long range?
 

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My first response also is how come such a long distance. Are you planning on sitting in the lodge by the fireplace and shooting off of the porch? Just kidding here. I don't think that you are going to find too many Alaskan outfitters who would be willing to agree to a shot at a grizzly from that far away. "Maybe" a 338-378 or something along those lines, but again you then have to be comfortable enough to make that shot with a shoulder cannon.
 

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Hunting bullets require a minimum velocity based on their construction in order to expand and provide a humane kill. This varies bullet to bullet. I came across 1600-1800FPS as a minimum back in 2005 when I did the research for the ammo I was planning on using for black bear. If I recall correctly, my shot had to be inside 500-600yds for my 300WinMag with a 180gr Remington core loc bullet to do it's job. Remington Core-locs are not considered a long distance round but hopefully you get the idea that there's a big difference in pinging steel at the ranges you mention and downing a big animal. I suspect that those specs may have changed since I went bear hunting in 05. Unless you want to carry a 375 Chey-Tec or a Barrett 50cal you might want to move your distance in just a tad. Just my .02

You might want to contact the bullet manufacturers you plan on using for more details on the FPS required for the expansion of their bullets and then reverse engineer the effective kill range with a Ballistic app. One other consideration is ammo availability when on the road. I picked 300WinMag and Remington Core-Loc 180gr rounds. Not because they represented the ultimate in performance but because they were widely available on the road. These days with some airlines refusing to take rifles in the cargo hold and restrictions on ammo in the cargo hold, I wanted to make sure that I could do my hunt in the event the separate ammo never made it to my destination or I could not take it with me at all.
 

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On the one hand, Moose and Bear do not have a keen sight to see you over 500 yards. That is, you can reduce the distance and use 300WM, 338LM. On the other hand, if it is impossible to reduce the distance (shot across the river, gorge, etc.), then it is necessary to use large calibers starting from 338LM. Keep in mind that the loss of pieces of meat at the exit hole is not to be avoided. I would prefer to hide to an acceptable distance for my 308Win Rem700 and Core-Lock PSP 180gr. My greatest elk hunting distance is 670 yards
 

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The 300WM with the Hornady Precision hunter line of ammo in 200gr+ ammo should work. As others have said....shorten up those distances if possible.
 

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I have a 7mm Weatherby and would not feel understated on deer or maybe elk. But my nephew builds his own rifles in 338 only and is for elk and deer. Again, the 338 would make sense for medium to small large game. But for big game, one might consider a 375 H&H magnum.
 
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