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LPVO: Reticle illumination giving shooter’s position away?

In tacticle situations, light coming out of the front of an LPVO (towards the target) could give the shooter’s position away. Which LPVOs would not do this?

When using illumination during low-light conditions (dusk or dawn), noticeable amounts of light can come out of the front of an LPVO towards the target.

The reason why this does or does not happen seems it could depend on where the retical is located (ffp or sfp) and how it is illuminated (simple LED behind the reticle or more complex fiber optic as part of the reticle).

It seems reticles located in the sfp would be less likely to do this, and reticles constructed with fiber optics in them (that radiate light backwards only [toward the shooter only]) would also be less likely to do this.

I am not able to find much information on this. I did see a reply in a forum that mentioned that a particular LPVO I am interested in does radiate light out the front. I have checked the LPVO that I currently own, and it radiates light out the front also.

I am looking for an LPVO that does not radiate light out the front. Any help on this will be much appreciated. Thanks.
 

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None of my Trijicon accupoints (TR 25 mil, TR24G, TR24 3G) are not visible through the front. Even the big green triangle reticle. Not sure about the red or amber though. My Accupower/Credo 1-8’s are visible and quite a bit so. The swampfox on my kids 450 is also visible. I think it’s the size of the illuminated reticle that really makes it visible. My Viper PST Gen 2 1-6 MRAD is barely visible up to the #4 setting-and in low light that setting is too bright in my opinion. The size what is illuminated is a factor you should consider as well.

hope that helps
 

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With the illumination being matched to the external light levels, I doubt it would be noticable. While not a LPVO, I just checked a Leupold MK6 3-18x44 M5C2, which is FFP, since the other MK6 is a LPVO and I doubt there is any difference in the illumination, and in a dark room I could see illumination from the objective end. It was more the illumination source than the reticle, it was faint, and I was in a nearly dark room, too dark for using any scope without NV added (which would block the source anyway).

In order to see the reticle from the objective end, I had to turn it up so high that from the ocular end, everything was washed out and just a big red circle, and that Tremor 2 reticle has a lot of stuff thats illuminated. On the LPVO MK6, only the center of the reticle is illuminated, making it a smaller potential to be an issue. The illumination control and battery on the MK6 is on the side focus knob. Not sure if that would make a difference.

When I get a chance, maybe once I get off, I have a Vortex Strike Eagle LPVO on a rifle that I will check. It has the illumination control and battery back near the ocular, and is SFP.

So far my biggest issue is if the shooter is in low light, but still enough light to use a day optic, and the illumination is set correctly for the conditions, and taking into account that the tube will block the illumination until you are pointing it at the targets face, I don't know that it is even an issue. That one of the things I noticed when checking the MK6 was I didn't see anything unless I was looking straight through the scope from the objective end. Shifting even a few degrees and I would see nothing. My eye position was about as important to see the illumination as when actually shooting correctly, so I am curious to test it, but based on what I've seen so far, I think for the target to see the illumination you would damned near have to aim at their eye, and even if they had night vision, the LVPO would be useless in conditions where the night vision could even be used.

I'm curious to test it but I don't see an issue.

Edit to add:
I checked the strike eagle, and it was actually worse, as in the reticle was clearly visible, but upside down, and much like the MK6, the scope had to be aimed pretty much directly at my pupil to see it. So much so that if aimed between my eyes, I can't see it, but shift an inch either direction and I can see it through that eye.

Of course this was all close range, and the cone of area in which the angle would be correct to see it will increase a with range, as the intensity also decreases. I also observed as the power setting was adjusted up, the illumination became smaller and less noticeable.
 
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