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Well, I had to pull the shotgun out for a presentation I'm giving to the boy scouts tonight, so I figured I might as well snap a shot!!



This one isn't as exciting as my last post, but hey, they all seem to have some sentimental value. This is a winchester Ranger 1300. 12g with a 28" Barrel with choke. Nothing fancy for sure. But, my dad bought this one for me for christmas when I was 13. Its nice to grow up in a firearm friendly family! The shotgun isn't worth much, but no money in the world can buy it from me!

MEL
 

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nice looking shotgun
yes it woulda been nice for me to grow up in a firearm friendly house but i didnt
i coudlnt have gotten a gun while living under my parents roof


have fun giving your presentation to the boy scouts
 

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Nice shotgun. Its up there in the Ranking with my Remington 870(i got it when i was 13) I think imluck to be like some and grow up in a firearm friendly family :D
 

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Looks like you took good care of it.... me id have to say im in a partial firearm family... my parents dont like guns in the house but are nice enough to let me keep them at my grandfathers who loves em and just get em from there but ya i know what u mean bout sentimental... my Marlin 30-30 got only 3 years ago lol but still ill nvr sell it i dont think
 

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Yeah, I'm beginning to wonder if everyone gets attached to their firearms like I do!! I seem to be attached to them all!!

The shotgun really was is in fantastic shape, but to be honest, its probably because I shoot it very little. I am not an avid bird or rabit hunter, but I do take it out for fun on occasion and to go with the the local scout troops to shoot some clay pigeons.

The presentation to the Scouts went fine, I work with several Boy Scout and Cub Scout troops here in town, they always call me when they need someone to help with firearms safety and orientation. (I used to be a scout master, and suspect my name is floating around from that). Its fun, I like working with the Youth, perhaps I might have a positive influence on a few of them!

MEL
 

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Mel,

You have more of a positive influence than you probably know of. I am also a certified range master for BSA for Archery. There is no better feeling than to show a young child how to hold, draw and shoot a bow and see that child's eyes light up when they hit the target for the first time. I have worked with several different youth groups here in Houston also. Keep up the great work Mel/
 

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Badshot:

I know several better feelings. Such as the gratitude of the person you're looking for during a S&R, when you finally find them and give them something warm. Or when you help a kid who is wounded(Full paramedics training is nice, and the evening classes were well worth it).

Also, teaching my two protegés(Two young women who I help with homework and lots of other stuff) how to do something creative is far more satisfying than teaching them how to shoot(One of them could very well go on to international competitions etc if she were willing).
 

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Nekekami said:
Also, teaching my two protegés(Two young women who I help with homework and lots of other stuff) how to do something creative is far more satisfying than teaching them how to shoot(One of them could very well go on to international competitions etc if she were willing).
I would not draw a distinction between what you would define as 'creative' and sharp shooting, as each takes time and dedication, as well as a love for the subject, and both can prove equally impressing: just as a large number of art lovers can be impressed by the new creation of a painter, or a number of musicians can be impressed by the creation of a composer, so too can a number of enthusiasts be impressed by the performance of a sharp shooter.

Ultimately, shooting can lead to a person's actualization, just as anything 'creative' can, and so it is as valuable to some people as the arts are to others. Teaching a dedicated enthusiast how to shoot well--to the point that they reach actaulization through it--would bring as much pleasure as teaching someone any of the more creative/productive hobbies known to man.

I offer as evidence the millions of Americans who just down right LOVE to go to the shooting range, or hunt game, or shoot bottles off their fence, and love to clean their guns, and love to reload their ammunition, and feel as if a piece of them is threatened when legislation is proposed to infringe on their capabilities of persuing such activities... these people are, I think, actualized through firearms and the expansive hobby of it, and I'm sure that helping those that are interested explore it in a constructive manner is as satisfying as assisting anyone else in any other field of interest.

Scatch Maroo
 

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Nekekami

Thank you for telling me that my little contribution to a few kids happiness doesnt mean much. It's ok, they will probably just wind up as gang bangers hangin' on the corner selling crack anyway.
 

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badshot:

Lay off the melodrama for a while. We both know that that's not what I wrote or meant. Hell, I do my share of basic marksmanship instruction as part of my military duties. Even if those kids thinks it's funny, and I'm helping them achieve that fun, it's nowhere near what the other things make you feel. What I did object to was the statement that there is no better feeling. I just listed my own experiences. My apologies if it seemed as if I was just brushing it away.

Scatch:

There's nothing creative about marksmanship itself, it's more akin to the same process that athletes go through, based on my training and my abilities as a sniper. The process is not the same as when I dance for example, or when I used to spend hour upon hour photographing. It's not the same process as when I spend hours in front of Maya, Terragen and Photoshop, or programming new routines for handling FFT's. However, in the art of weaponsmithing there can be creativity, but even there it is more evolution than innovation, with much of it following tried and true paths. As an example, the experimental long-range cartridge I'm developing together with a buddy is more a case of evolution than creativity. Metaphysically and philosophically speaking, creativity isn't really the same as affirming onself. Rather, creativity is a way of just being oneself, and the outcome of that is just a result. One of the reasons why many of the great artists have been what we today would label as sociopaths and even psychopaths. Their creativity and their works of art came very much as part of their lack of inhibition, and their non-conformity to some of the social norms and taboos prevalent at the time. Some historical examples are Rembrandt(obsessive and pedantic) and Van Gogh(Obsessive/Compulsive and manic, although the most likely reasons for why he cut off his ear is that he had Tinnitus). Leonardo Da Vinci was a compulsive/manic individual. And all three of them were geniuses. They all broke with some of the norms within society, and they all created things, which even to this day influences science. Leonardo for his math, physics and architecture, Rembrandt for his studies on light, shadows, reflections. Yet, for them, it wasn't a conscious act of making themselves happy. For them, it was instinctual, an inherent drive.
 

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Nekekami said:
There's nothing creative about marksmanship itself, it's more akin to the same process that athletes go through, based on my training and my abilities as a sniper. The process is not the same as when I dance for example, or when I used to spend hour upon hour photographing.
I did not mean to equate marksmanship with creativity, and I apologize for not communicating clearly. The comparison I tried to make was in the joy one can experience in teaching either. I completely agree with your equation between athletics and marksmanship (in terms of preparation).

When you say:

Metaphysically and philosophically speaking, creativity isn't really the same as affirming onself. Rather, creativity is a way of just being oneself, and the outcome of that is just a result.

I interpret that to mean you believe creativity to be the outlet of human expression, the forum in which a human being is capable of communicating to the rest of the world, "This is who I am." If my interpretation is wrong, please bare with me as I try to grasp it--I have difficulties with the English language at times, so please forgive me.


Nekekami said:
One of the reasons why many of the great artists have been what we today would label as sociopaths and even psychopaths. Their creativity and their works of art came very much as part of their lack of inhibition, and their non-conformity to some of the social norms and taboos prevalent at the time. Some historical examples are Rembrandt(obsessive and pedantic) and Van Gogh(Obsessive/Compulsive and manic, although the most likely reasons for why he cut off his ear is that he had Tinnitus). Leonardo Da Vinci was a compulsive/manic individual. And all three of them were geniuses. They all broke with some of the norms within society, and they all created things, which even to this day influences science. Leonardo for his math, physics and architecture, Rembrandt for his studies on light, shadows, reflections. Yet, for them, it wasn't a conscious act of making themselves happy. For them, it was instinctual, an inherent drive.
I see these offered examples as evidence for my interpretation of what you consider to be the value of creativity. You say, "it wasn't a conscious act of making themselves happy," but I imagine they felt some degree of fulfillment (unless they suffered from depression, or some other mental disease preventing such feeling), and its this sense of fulfillment that drives them, that 'instinctual/inherent drive' is toward fulfillment?

Perhaps this was not the case with the more famous artists, but would you grant that the majority of artists do not suffer from such mental illnesses, and are driven by fulfillment? I would think YOUR satisfaction in teaching youth to express themselves creatively would come from seeing that they (the youth) recognize in various particular forums of creativity their preferred method of expression. Perhaps a girl hates to draw, but she loves to compose music... and once you teach (show) her musical composition, she not only discovers her love for it, but you discover her love for it, and then gain a sense of satisfaction from showing this girl what she loves to do. I would think that would lead the girl to a sense of fulfillment, but if you disagree, please elaborate.

And so, although marksmanship is not necessarily creative, like sports are not creative, there is something about marksmanship (and sports, too) that people are capable of finding fulfillment in, and so the two are equal in that it brings someone to a sense of fulfillment. And so, Badshot teaching youth how to shoot may bring the same level of joy as you teaching youth how to do anything creative because you each are teaching specific youths who will one day be fueled by, and receive, a sense of fulfillment from marksmanship or a creative forum.

Scatch Maroo
 

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Badshot,

I think that what you do with those kids is FANTASTIC! If it wasn't for people like you, many more kids really would end up at our city corners selling crack. Keep up the good work Badshot! :wink:

Nek,

The situations you described are great as well. However I do not believe one to be better than the other. The actions of these individual situations share the same common goal which is to "help others". That is the most important part.

There are times to compete and overcome others however this is not one of those subjects.
 
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