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Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to be getting a Remington 700 here soon in 22-250 ( I know its a wussy caliber but i want something for varminting). I'm planning on getting a Leuopold scope also, what do you recommend for rings and mounts? one piece or 2 piece? Any input on what would be better and why I would greatly appreciate it. THank you.



Brian
 

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I would recommend a one piece base because it adds rigidity to the action. It doesn't really matter being that this is a .22-250 (I have a 700 VSSF in the same caliber) instead of a magnum long action where it really counts. I have dealt with both one and two piece Leupold mounts and they both work fine, but just passing along advice that was given to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the info. I figured one piece bases would be better but i wasn't 100% sure, plus since it would be a lighter caliber, i know that recoil isn't as much of a factor. SO do you recommend if i get a Leupold scope that i get Leuopold rings and base? I just know that so many little factors go into making a gun very very accurate, especially at long ranges. Anything else you can shed some light on id love it. Thank you.
 

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Leupold bases and rings work fine. If you're varminting, why buy a $300 mounting setup? I would recommend Leupold mounts if you are buying a Leupold Scope. If you're not sure what mounts you would like, try their mount selector(http://www.leupold.com/resources/MountFitChart/default.asp)

I would suggest a standard one piece base as well as low rings.

TJ General Store (http://www.tjgeneralstore.com) has excellent prices on Leupold scopes and mounts. You can find the exact Leupold part no. as well, making sure you get exactly what you want.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Since you have been so helpful with answering my questions, thank you very much, I wanted to ask a couple more. What are the pros and cons of one piece bases? To me, accuracy wise it makes the most sense to have a one piece base, that way there isn't as much movement as could happen with a 2 piece base. Could you also give me some incite as to other things to take into consideration with a long distance rifle? What things could be fine tuned after you get a factory rifle? I know that adjusting the trigger really helps because i've shot quite a few rifles that have had the trigger worked on and it makes a world of a difference. If you could possibly share a couple of things to consider, i'd appreciate it. Thank you.
 

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Ok, I'll see what I can do.

I would agree that a one piece base is less prone to movement. You'll be happy with one.

As for general tips for long gun accuracy:

In my opinion, the best thing for repeated accuracy is a good fit. As you said, trigger work makes a huge difference. It's probably the first thing everybody should check into before resorting to more drastic tweaks. The stock should fit your build and face. The scope should be mounted in line with your eye, both vertically and horizontally for a quick sight picture when you get down on the stock. Imagine a gun being a new car, this would be like adjusting the seat, mirrors, pedals, etc.

Secondly, you should use quality ammuntion. Federal Gold Medal Match is about the best for the money. If you handload (or have a friend who does, APK...), custom ammo will perform the same, if not better. The point is you should know what the gun can do with quality ammo before you take it any further with actual gunsmithing.

With the first two suggestions being followed, the best thing to do is practice. Before you funnel some cash into the gun, you may want to know you, the shooter, are able to get the gun to its peak performance. That's the way I operate, and I'm just suggesting it. You may have the cash to fund it all upfront...

The next level is gunsmithing, or after-market things (barrels, triggers, stocks, etc.). I haven't had anything like this done/installed on either of my rifles. I am confident with the accuracy as is, and I won't have the time to shoot them for a few years. Thank the U.S. Navy. Here's part of Mel's post in the FAQ forum. These are some of the things that can be done to the action to improve accuracy.

What does lapping the lugs mean?

This is where some lapping compound is used on the lugs to "wear" the lugs smooth. What this does is create 100% surface mating of the bolt lugs to the chamber lugs. This creates a uniform pressure to be created which aids in accuracy. It's generally fairly affordable and generally does provide good results.

Square the action face? What is that?

Because of mass production, many times the face of a rifle action is not 100% square, or flat. To make a uniform and universal mating surface of the barrel to the action, a gunsmith will machine the face of the action to make it square and uniform. This is another means of improving accuracy. It does require removing the barrel.

What does "blue printing" mean?

When a rifle action is manufactured in large quantities, a certain level of tolerances is set. For instance, if the dimensions of an action are within .01 inch, it's considered acceptable. Blueprint is where someone will attempt to make an action meet the EXACT specifications as drawn on the blueprints.
Hopefully this post helps you and others in your shoes. Feel free to ask more questions if you're not sure about anything. I wish this forum was running when I put together my first Rem. 700. Good Luck!
 

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gimpmsu,

Dan has many good points. One I would emphasize is to get the one piece base. The Leupold base is fairly inexpensive but worth it. If you truly want a "tactical" style base and rings, IOR makes a base and rings just like the Badger line. It is less than half the cost, looks good, and after lapping, will hold up very well. I have these on a budget PSS I built and will not change them.

Second again to Dan on the ammo. Federal Gold Medal Match or Black Hills should be the only "factory" ammo that you should use. Of course, handloads are great but I would shoot factory until you really get your feet wet.

I would practice, practice, practice and then worry about upgrades. The only caveat to this is the trigger. I would have a COMPETENT gunsmith adjust the trigger to no less than 3lbs. BR shooter can have their ounce triggers but dragging around in the field with a light trigger is only going to bring problems.

Also, the .22-250 is a great varmint round, anyone that tells you different doesn't know what they are talking about.

Hope this helps.
 

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Brian,

I have a few Remingtons and the triggers were too damn heavy for me to get the kind of precision and consistency I wanted out of them. With a heavy trigger pull, its not very hard to actually pull the rifle out of line just a TAD when you finally have the trigger break. And at 300+ yards, that can mean missing your target from inches, to feet! UNACCEPTABLE!!!!! If you send me a PM, I will explain best how to tweak your trigger for you, or, look in the DIY section at 700 Triggers.

Respectfully,
Tyler Consugar
 

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Good advice from Tyler there, The trigger on my M700 from the factory was a tad over 8lbs. I adjusted it andnow it comes in at under 3lbs, and has almost no travel, and 0 creep. This made a huge difference in consistancy for me.
 
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