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Discussion Starter #1
Well I finally took the plunge, Got to fly a Cessna 172 today.

Preflight, Taxing, Takeoff, Banking, Turning... he let me do it all sept land.

Was all really fun till I had to give the controls back, It was time to land. I am in talks with sallie mae about getting a loan to send me to flight school. I'm really pumped. I dont think I've had this much fun in a long long time.

I'd be learning in an older model 152 due to the cheap rental fee of it, but We've got a deal worked out where I pay him for all ground instruction in high quality choice angus beef (I'm a butcher for a living for those of you who didnt know).

Anyone got any comments on what I should expect, or what I should pay close close attention to for the test? Any comments on the 152 and its capabilities? Mabye it would be easier to learn on a 172? I know there are more than a few pilots on here, so cut loose y'all.
 

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Well... I am by no means a pilot. But I took a few lessons. From what I heard, the 172s are the trainer of choice for new pilots. Out here in the summer the 152s arent even an option sometimes due to their lack of power in certain weather conditions.
 

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Good deal spade!! I'm glad you enjoyed it.

I learned in a 150, which is the same airplane as the 152, but LESS horsepower. For the same reasons as you, it was cheaper. The 172's are larger in every dimension and therefore more comfortable and they have more horsepower. If you can afford it, the 172 is probably a better choice, but certainly not mandatory. Keep in mind you will probably be flying for 50-60 hours before you get your license. The extra cost adds up, but also, thats a lot of time to spend in an airplane that isn't comfortable to fly. Pick your poison I guess.

I would highly recommend you get your written test out of the way early so its not luming over your head. Its not that hard, and if you can find a ground school nearby, thats probably the quickest and easiest way to pass it.

The more often you can fly, the better, and you'll end up taking less hours before you go for your checkride.

Your solo is just around the corner :D

MEL
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Flight school of Gwinnett, estimated at 40 hours of flight time in a Cessna 152 as shown.

How much is flight school exactly? Also, what are your insurance premiums for being a pilot?
40 HOURS CESSNA 152 AT $65.00 PER FLIGHT HOUR ............... 2,600.00
20 HOURS OF FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR TIME AT $38.00 .................760.00
15 HOURS OF PRE AND POST FLIGHT BRIEFINGS AT $38.00 ........ 570.00
CESSNA COMPUTER BASED INSTRUCTION KIT ........................... 299.00
WRITTEN TEST FEE (Paid to Testing Center available here at TFS) .... 90.00
MEDICAL EXAMINATION (Paid to Doctor) .................................... 75.00
FINAL FLIGHT TEST FEE (Paid to FAA Examiner available here at TFS) 300.00


TOTAL $4,424.00


My price will be a little lower.... more like 3500.
I am unaware on the insurace premiums.
 

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Do not count on only taking 40 hours to get your license. Most people need 50+ before taking the check ride. You might be able to do it in 40 if you do it all at once, as in taking 2 weeks off of work to do nothing but fly for several hours each day.

Life Insurance premiums will be about triple the normal rate until you get hours built up. (generally 100+) then they will start to go down. Instrument rating helps also.

MEL
 
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