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Hey yall, I'm pretty new to long range. i am seeking the knowledge of what i need for hitting something out to my current goal (1000 yards). I have an R700 SPS Tactical AAC. (.308) with a Trijicon 5-20x50 Accupoint optic. EGW 20 moa Rail, and some Weaver rings for starters. and shooting Federal Premium Gold Medal175gr SMK BTHP, Being that i am new and know nothing on reloading, and i am also in the process of saving up for a house...So far im hitting 1MOA (1 inch) Groups at 100 yards. in a week i'm moving out to my buddies farm down in Clay City IN, and he said i can shoot out to as far as i want on his land, so i'm taking the advantage of this offer by setting up my own little range to eventually hit out to 1000 yards, and if i ever can become successful with it i plan on trying to push further...i am on the waiting list for a mcmillan A5 Stock so in January ill be installing that. I am looking to try to do this with the least amount of techology, so i can learn with and without so if it came to a **** Hit The Fan shituation i'll be good to go, If anyone can help me along this journey, it would be a HUGE HELP! thanks!!!
- MIKE
 

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so if it came to a **** Hit The Fan shituation i'll be good to go
Don't.

... and I mean it. Just don't.

Regarding your long range goal... what would you consider the goal achievement? If you launch 10rnds and hit a full size IPSC target once at 1000yds, would that do it? Launch 10 and hit 5? Launch 1 and hit 1? If you're 1moa at 100yds, thats 1moa at 1000yds which is basically 10.5 inches. So you could certainly keep it on a 18" wide by 30" tall target if all things are equal. Though in the field, rarely are all things equal. Yet if you launch enough bullets, you'd easily get a hit.

If your goal is to lay down and hit a 12" target from 0 to 1000yds on your first shot, anywhere, on command... well... then you have a long journey ahead of you, and you better start saving money.
 

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Sierra317, the best advice starting out I can give you is assess how important your goal is to you, realize the road to success in anything is always longer and more costly than it initially appears, not just in money, and be prepared to do the work if you want to succeed.

It will help if your motivation for your endeavor is a worthy one, pinned to a personal value, and not something flighting. Something like being the absolute best you can be with your rifle. Anything less and you'll be selling yourself short, and might not reach your goal. It'll take commitment.

Some people are lucky, some people are good. To be good, you have to want it.

Study up on good shooting technique. Study up on range equipment. Study up on everything you can that may help reduce your group sizes now at 100 yards, then keep trying.
Buy some more boxes of your ammo. Go out and apply what you studied while you shoot your rifle. Take your time. Think. Question everything.
Study what you are doing, while you are doing it. Study the results when you are done. Try new things. Experiment. Assess the results. Apply what you learned.
Wash, rinse, repeat.
Discipline, focus and attention to detail.

Everything you do and learn at 100 yards will be a building block for the next range jump. The next range jump will hold new lessons of its own.

See if there is someone in your area who is a marksman, who you can learn something from. Have him shoot your rifle. Are the results the same? Why or why not?

In the end, the only one who can answer the question "Is it really worth it?" Is you.
If you really like shooting, all of this will be fun and rewarding. Sure there will be times when you get frustrated or otherwise disenchanted. Change it up, try a new approach, take a break. Then shoot again.

Good luck to you, and if you do reach your goal, be the person who helps others new on the road to achieve. You'll be a better person for it. This isn't or shouldn't be a "secret society". It should be a brotherhood filled with camaraderie.
 

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First of all you need to go to a class that teaches range estimation and old school math windage and bullet drop calculations. This is something you need to learn in person and not from a book. You need to spend time with real experienced shooters to tell you what you are doing wrong and help you get on target better. Help you with breathing, body position behind your rifle, and every aspect of how you interact with your rifle.
 

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How much do you have in your shooting budget for a rifle, reloading equip ETC. Realize that that the cost of going from 1 MOA equipment to 1/4 MOA can be in the thousands. Better to have realistic expectations based on the limitations of your budget. Getting the best bang for your buck starts with how much you have to spend. The good stuff usually comes at a price.
 

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Because he said he wants to learn using the least amount of technology. I guess you can learn it from a book or video, but in my opinion would be easier learning from someone in person that knew what the hell they were talking about and could help break it down and demonstrate it in person and show it on the range then prove it with the electronics. Then in a class with experienced instructors and shooters they can help with the other shooting fundamentals and help him reach his goal and faster than on his own. Feedback is a good thing when you are screwing up and cant figure out why something is not working right.
 

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Because he said he wants to learn using the least amount of technology. I guess you can learn it from a book or video, but in my opinion would be easier learning from someone in person that knew what the hell they were talking about and could help break it down and demonstrate it in person and show it on the range then prove it with the electronics. Then in a class with experienced instructors and shooters they can help with the other shooting fundamentals and help him reach his goal and faster than on his own. Feedback is a good thing when you are screwing up and cant figure out why something is not working right.
I agree with receiving training. However, I don't think range estimation needs to be "on site" training. Pretty easy for guys to learn that on their own.
 

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While it's short range, I learned range estimation all on my own shooting archery for years. Take your rifle and go for a hike. Set up and shoot at a rock or tree. Guess the yardage, then range it with laser see how close you are. Range estimation is a lot like wind calls. The only way to get better at it is too get out and practice it.
 

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I agree with receiving training. However, I don't think range estimation needs to be "on site" training. Pretty easy for guys to learn that on their own.
We always throw that in with with wind estimation and other tasks, but yes I agree it is pretty easy to learn range estimation on your own. I was more referring to the math portion of that sentence and the basics of long range shooting and marksmanship he needed to learn in a class from experienced instructors and shooters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you for the information!
For everyone who did comment on my post

1. I am working on an M40a5 build slowly but surely as I push further on my journey with my rifle, so my limitations on "budget" aren't very low, just the waiting game on saving up is the hard part.

2. The reason behind the "old school" way of learning is for when I do have all of the electronic tool to help on the easier side of thing, I'd like that knowledge as a back up for if something goes wrong or the equipment breaks cause I'm the kinda guy who thinks ahead with WHAT IF

3. I do plan on attending a long range class within the next year, Sniper Central is the class I actually picked for when I have all the equipment for their requirements.

4. As I said in this post I'm a newbie, and for right now 1000 it may take a while but I'm a guy who once they have a goal they do anything and everything to meet that goal! This long range shooting journey isn't JUST to have fun shooting but I want it because of the learning experience! And for the drive and motivation and dedication of just striving to push farther. So in the end to me personally it all will be worth it!

5. My groupings COLD BORE SHOTS (shoot once wait about 20 mins or so then shoot again) are 1 inch because of the hogue stock that came factory with the rifle, many many LR Shooters told me to ditch it and get something better and it will be a big change...the closest I got my groupings were practically touching at 100..the main reason why I never shot farther is because all of my local ranges are only to 100 NE-PA sucks for LR shooting..hence why I'm taking this offer at my buddies farm...

I came here for knowledge and advice from people, not a lecture!
If you're here to help and pass knowledge I greatly appreciate it...but if you're here for anything else, go to the next thread ca use negativity isn't welcome on my posts! We're all here for the same reason, so let's help eachother as brothers!


P.S here's that closest grouping I got at 100 when I zeroed my trijicon to my rifle
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
BTW The whole "Negativity" thing on my previous comment is for anyone and everyone who tries to be an ass on this thread..not for anyone in particular or the previous comments before this one!!! Just so no one thinks I'm talking about trying to "start ****" I just don't want any negativity. Only positive helpful knowledge! As i said We are all here for the same reason, and for that it should be a brotherhood, a family...and for that we should stick together and help eachother out when in need!
 

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But the big question here is, besides shooting and "learning my rifle" what do I start studying first? And then what after that? I understand that I need to learn range estimation, but what else should I start with so I can reach my next "step"?
 

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While it's short range, I learned range estimation all on my own shooting archery for years. Take your rifle and go for a hike. Set up and shoot at a rock or tree. Guess the yardage, then range it with laser see how close you are. Range estimation is a lot like wind calls. The only way to get better at it is too get out and practice it.
I learned range estimation when I playing LOTS of golf and got pretty good at it up to about 500 yds, especially for courses that had few yardage markers. ;)
 

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But the big question here is, besides shooting and "learning my rifle" what do I start studying first? And then what after that? I understand that I need to learn range estimation, but what else should I start with so I can reach my next "step"?
I'd go to Orkan's website, Primal Rights. Go the article section and start reading.
 
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But the big question here is, besides shooting and "learning my rifle" what do I start studying first? And then what after that? I understand that I need to learn range estimation, but what else should I start with so I can reach my next "step"?
Start reading up on the math portion. Are you using mil or moa? Start learning conversions just in case. Maybe pick up a mildot master and a databook if you dont have one already. There was one card I had that had a pendulum on it for measuring the angle, cant remember the card, but had conversions and calculations on it.
 
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