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:) Hi!
Ok, I know you guys are gonna laugh, but I badly need some professional advice.

Two days ago, I bought a cheap air rifle from canadian tire for 60$. It's Marksman 2015 LaserHawk BB repeater air rifle. The package also included a load of copper BBs and a scope. Pretty cheap, huh? I am ashamed :oops: to say that I am not a sniper and that I have never held a real sniper rifle in my hands. This is where you come in! :p

My problem is with aiming when I look trough the scope. Here's how I fire: I target with the scope, and when the center of my crosshair points directly onto the target, I fire. But here's what happens : The BB always goes lower than at what I aimed at. Then I took the scope off and I fired with bare rifle, and I got the BB to hit at my desired height(so the rifle is precise). So what I understand is that this is perfectly normal because the BB that comes out of the muzzle is not at the same height as the scope: The scope is always higher. So it makes sense that when I target at something, the BB always hits lower;

How do I fix this? ( If there is any way, besides taking the darn, cheap 4x20 scope off)

Real sniper's scopes are also more elevated than the barells, but the bullets always hit right on target. How do they do this? Do they have to change settings on the scope for different distances? If yes (most probably), how do they do it?

Any help will be greatly apreciated.

Thanks a lot! :eek:

PS> I don't think that it's me who shakes during the trigger pull , because I get it right without the scope. But on the other hand, you never know....
 

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1shot1kill said:
How do I fix this? ( If there is any way, besides taking the darn, cheap 4x20 scope off)

Real sniper's scopes are also more elevated than the barells, but the bullets always hit right on target. How do they do this? Do they have to change settings on the scope for different distances? If yes (most probably), how do they do it?
I'm a noob too, as you will see when everyone corrects and adds to my reply. :)

"Real" rifle scopes are adjustable for distance, as well as other factors. When you first mount a scope onto your rifle, you have to 'zero' it in. You repeatedly aim your rifle at an X or cross at a specific range (such as 100 yards, 200 yards, etc.) and fire. If the bullet is down and to the right, but your cross hairs were right on the target, you adjust the knobs on your scope to move your crosshairs down and to the right. Until you have lots of experience, your adjustments will seem more random than calculated.

After your first adjustment, you take sight again and fire. Now you see how far off you are. With luck, you are still down and to the right but not nearly so much as the first time: with no luck, you're up and to the left, and must reverse your adjustments.

The closer you get to the bullet landing where the crosshairs are, the smaller the adjustments, until your bullets land where the crosshairs lie.

Note that it is very important to be precise during this operation, and sandbags in front and back, or only in back (if you have a bipod) are used to ensure the rifle is steady and still as you're firing. Once you've zeroed in your rifle, there is usually something on the knobs that you can change to show what position is 'zero' for your rifles, so that you can change the knobs for distance later and still return to their 'zeroed' positions.

Your cross hairs have only been 'zeroed' in for the distance at which you 'zeroed' them in: if you zeroed them in at a 100 yard range, then your cross hairs will only be accurate for 100 yard distances; if you zeroed in at 200 yards, it will only be accurate for 200 yard distances. A sniper, however, will not be dissuaded by a target at a variety of ranges as he can easily compensate for this.

Quality scopes almost always (I believe) have what are known as mil-dot reticles (a sticky in this forum details their function and performance) which not only allow the sniper to gauge distance to a target, but compensate for said distance. If you have zeroed in your rifle at 100 yards, but want to shoot something at X distance, you have to either use a laser distance meter thingy (brain fart: point the box at the target and it uses a laser to tell you how far it is), or you can use the mil-dot reticle: if you know the height of the object, you simply place the cross hairs at the bottom or top of the target and depending on how many vertical mil-dots the target spans, you can then determine the distance. I believe this is true, but I lack personal experience, so I might be ass wrong. ;)

Once you've determined the range of the object, you then consult your Ammunition Ballistics Chart, a chart detailing the type of ammunition you frequently use and ballistics characteristics regarding them. Different factory/reload rounds shoot differently than other rounds, and so a ballistics chart will tell you how many increments of adjustment must be made to your scope depending on how far you want the bullet to travel. Said increments are known as MOA, or Minute of Angle (complicated mathematical formula that nerds love :lol:). You can either then adjust the knobs on your scope (and then quickly return them to zero, as described earlier) OR you can actually use those nifty mil-dots you see through your scope.

Ballistic charts will also give you information to help you determine how affected your round will be by wind currents, but I am ignorant as to whether or not there is any way to compensate for winds; because winds can change drastically over short distances (winds at a 300 yard difference may vary from winds at an 800 yard distance), I'm not sure if it's plausible to try to compensate for the wind.

The mil-dot thread is quite important to understanding my muddled explanations.

Please, anyone, correct me where I have gone wrong, or elaborate where I may have obfuscated a point.

Scatch Maroo
 

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Windage can generally be adjusted for by observing the way various things are behaving at distance intervals.

If a bush is moving to the left at 100 yards, then you adjust the crosshairs right, so that the left-facing wind is pushing the round to the intended path.

But if the wind at 200 yards is going right (Yeah, this is sounding odd), then you should probably just aim dead-on. The wind will push it left, but then pushes it right (ideally by the same amount.)

See, it's a really bad explanation for drift due to ecological factors, but if I get the point across even somewhat, then I've done my half-assed job.
 

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Hey, a shooter from my neck of the woods.

Uhh...Just do what Scatch said lol

Actually, what he said about keeping the rifle secured on sandbags...do that, and leave it with the sights pointed at the bulls eye you just hit. Don't disturb the sight picture! Then look through your scope and see where the crosshairs point. That will show you how much you need to adjust too, same as shooting it.
 
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