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Discussion Starter #1
I recently bought a box of Remington ammo for my .300 Ultra mag.
180 grain bullets in Nosler partitions.

When I opened them I noticed they were pointing down in a plastic box. Examining the bullets I noticed the nice lead point had been slightly mushroomed so that it was mostly flat, I assume this was due to shipping.

They people at the store says this wont matter, but I don't think so. It will change coefficients and the consistency in flight will not be the same.

Has anyone had any experience with this, and if I'm right, why does Remington keep shipping them this way? Are there any better alternatives?
 

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Nosler partitions are an accurate hunting bullet, but rather middle of the pack. The exposed lead is not conductive to accuracy at all, really. They warp during recoil and get scuffed up. As for most hunting bullets, when you actually take them in the field and rough them up, they kinda get battered, so there isn't really much to worry about there. They are made with an 8 inch killzone at 200 meters in mind, or a 16 inch killzone out to 400 meters, and the deformed one can still do that just fine.

Without seeing the round they may just be made like that anyway, and they are as they are supposed to be.

Try something with no exposed lead like a core-lokt, those will do just as well and not be subject to the deformity, or a tipped round (polymer tip) so there is nothing that can be deformed.
 

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Listen to what the Muzz says, it is good advice. Some of the polymer tipped bullets work very well indeed. The deformed lead tips on the ones that you got might have some effect on the flight path, but I doubt that you will notice much. If I remember correctly the tips of those bullets are not exactly pointy, more like a rounded tip. You might want to try some of the Remington Scirocco loaded rounds. They are a polymer tipped boat tail bullet, so deformation should not be an issue. They come in either 150grn with a BC of .435 or 180grn with a BC of .500. The Nosler bonded come in 180grn with a BC of .472 or 200grn with a BC .481.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I will be using the bullets for hunting, I and I know nosler partition are a good hunting bullet. I was just suprised the amount of flattening and mushrooming i saw on the rounds. I do handload from time to time and know that these rounds have been flattened, to the point where the diameter of the tip is larger than the diameter just before the tip.

As far as Corelokt and polymer ballistics tips go, how are they for a hunting round?

I have used ballistic tips for hunting deer before and have taken one Elk with a ballistic tip, but these were all at fairly close range ( <200 yards)

I'm hesitant however to use a ballistic tip round on elk at long ranges, which will probably be the shot I'm up against given my hunting location this year. (400+)

Am I wrong in my thinking?
 

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You're exactly right, Hunter.

Keep the ballistic tips like Nosler ballistic tip, Remington accutip, and Winchester CT ballistic silvertipped for deer duty, or things under 3-400 pounds we'll say. They expand violently enough to be perfect for deer at any range, but don't hold together well enough for heavy animals. For non-tipped ammo, stay away from Sierra Gamekings on the heavy animals too, they are best used on smaller stuff like deer and black bear as well.

Remington core lokt, core lokt ultra, Nosler partition, Swift A-frame, Winchester partition gold, Barnes X, Trophy bonded bear claw, and Winchester fail safe are all good non-tipped rounds I would use on elk sized game out to 400 yards. They are accurate enough and terminal performance is good. They have the proper blend of penetration and expansion you need for heavy muscle, hide and bone.

Polymer tipped rounds for big tough game at any range are Winchester CT accubond and Nosler accubond (same bullet, winchester loads one, federal loads the other), Remington Scirroco bonded, which is a Swift bullet, and Hornady Interbond. Don't use non-bonded polymer tipped ammo on the big stuff.
 

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The Corelockt is the original bonded type bullet, the core is locked to the jacket, and it expands violently on game while retaining almost all its weight. It does however have an exposed lead tip, I have seen deformed ones stillshoot well under MOA so it should not be an issue. I love them and currently am developing a 270 load for my mauser using the 130gr version for a potential trip up to Canada( trying to get Muzz to find me a Moose). I am using IMR 4350 for powder with a goal of driving the 130 to about 3100fps at the muzzle over Win LR primers.

http://www.remington.com/ammo/centerfir ... relokt.htm
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys,

Thats a lot of good info and helps out a bunch.

Hope you get your moose....If you ever draw here in Idaho let me know, I see a few now and then, might be able to help out.

Thanks again
 

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No prob Hunter, glad to have some questions here I could help with.

The core-lokt is probably the most affordable "do everything" bullet.
 
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