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Discussion Starter #1
I am going with the Lee press and kit for the 50BMG, BUT I will also be reloading 308 and 300WM. What dies should I stay away from and what dies are good to go? Any and all advice welcome!!

(just for 308 and 300WM, it comes with the 50BMG dies)
 

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I say use RCBS and Redding dies. They are really the best. But if you are going to load for the .50BMG, dies made by either of these two makers will be really expensive.

Lee dies are more affordable and they do work. But Lee dies are not as nice as Redding or RCBS. Lee dies work and they are good value for the money. I have a set in 6.5x55mm.

But given a choice I use RCBS or Redding dies. I don't have any experience with Hornady dies. I bought some Lyman dies in 7x57mm back in 1988, but I replaced these with a set of RCBS dies.

Another thing: RCBS has fantastic customer service. They have a toll free number and they sent me free replacement parts for my 8mm Mauser dies.


Mad.
 

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The Forster case trimmer is probably the nicest one on the market.


I have a Lyman case trimmer. It is not as nice as the Forster, but still perfectly acceptable.

If you are only trimming brass in one or two calibers, it might be a good idea to simply get a Lee hand trimmer.

This little gadget is cheap. It consists of a cutter, lock stud and pilot. The pilot is different for each caliber. And you trim the case by rotating the cutter by hand. It is like using a kiddie's pencil sharpener.

I use a Lee hand trimmer for trimming 6.5x55mm brass. I also use one for .223 brass.

Lee hand trimmers are cheap and easy and everyone should have a few on hand.

Check it out: http://www.cabelas.com/products/Cpod0003098.jsp



Mad
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The Lee is what I was looking at using untill I got comfortable with reloading and knew a little more about what I was doing, glad to hear that they are nice little gizzmoes to have around.

Any sugestions on where to buy all this stuff at?

lee deluxe 308 die set
lee cutter/stud lock 50BMG
lee deluxe 300WM die set
lee case length guage shellholder 50BMG
frankford arsenal tumbler
lee cutter and studlock
lee case length guage and shell holder
lee anniversary reloading kit w/modern reloading manual
lee classic cast 50BMG press kit w/dies
(need the lee 308 case length guage and shell holder, midway is out)

for a grand total for $360

Any advice or sugestions? .............please advise...........any info accepted.....Thanks!!
 

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You can buy the Lee parts directly from Lee or from Cabelas. And I would advise that you be patient.

You do not have to buy everything at once. A little bit here and a little bit there and before you know it, you will be all tooled up.

Lee dies are quite usable, but you really should get RCBS or Redding dies instead. You can use Lee parts for everything else.

I use a Lee press, but I mostly use RCBS dies.

Mad.
 

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I agree with Mad about dies. I use nothing but RCBS dies for my 25-06, 7 Rem Mag and 300 RUM. What you have right now is a great starter set but you might give some thought to upgrading to the RCBS when finances allow. Or you can sneak them by the wife and not get caught.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Am I safe with the Lee Anniversary reloading kit? I know it is cheap (price) but I have heard very good things about them.
 

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You are very safe. It is a great deal.

Just get some RCBS dies. And you can get the dies one at a time. Get the .308 dies first. And in a month or two get the magnum dies.

The Lee kit is excellent. You can even use their dies for a while. But eventually you will want RCBS or Redding dies. It is the Law of Reloading.

I started off with a Lee kit and some Lee dies in 6.5x55mm. But then I bought some RCBS dies in 6.5x55mm. I still have my Lee 6.5x55mm dies and I use these with my Swedish Mauser. I set the RCBS dies up for use in my Sako.

Mad
 

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I would say yes you have decent equipment. Now you have to be very careful in loading and pay very close attention to the smallest of details when reloading. Measure everything and double check everything. Remember you are messing with gunpowder capable of creating a very nasty situation very quickly if something bad happens. Pay very close attention to your primers when seating them. Never smoke or have an open fire of any kind around gunpowder. I have never had this happen but I have read about it in that a spark from static electricity from you to your grain scale can happen. This could set your powder off. Do you have someone that can be around to show you the ins and outs for a week or 2?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
badshot said:
I would say yes you have decent equipment. Now you have to be very careful in loading and pay very close attention to the smallest of details when reloading. Measure everything and double check everything. Remember you are messing with gunpowder capable of creating a very nasty situation very quickly if something bad happens. Pay very close attention to your primers when seating them. Never smoke or have an open fire of any kind around gunpowder. I have never had this happen but I have read about it in that a spark from static electricity from you to your grain scale can happen. This could set your powder off. Do you have someone that can be around to show you the ins and outs for a week or 2?
Thanks for the advice. Yes, I do have a guy that is going to show me the ropes before I run wild with it. That is the reason that I never got into reloading in the first place, I had no one to teach me.
 

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Always put primers in BEFORE gunpowder.
The pointed end of the bullet sticks out.

When processing your brass I like to do it in this order:
deprime and resize (I prefer ONE SHOT case lube)
clean primer pockets
length trim and deburr inside and outside
tumble for 8 hours (I like 'em purty and shiny)
make sure there is no tumbler media stuck in the little hole the primer fire goes thru

now you are ready to install your primers and begin the loading process.

Good luck and always remember safety first. (Gawd I sound like my dad!)
 

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Don't laugh.

I don't even own a tumbler.

If my cases get really dirty, I just soak them in detergent.

Then I rinse them and let them air-dry.

Call me old fashioned, call me plain wrong, but call me

Mad
 

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I use corn cob media. I have given thought to replacing it with Walnut though.

Mad,

I find that you dont tumble very interesting. I was always told and read in the loading manuals that you should always do it.
 

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Back in the early 1980s, no-one tumbled their brass. That's when I started loading ammo.

The only reason to tumble brass cases is to clean them. You do not want to score your sizing die with a gritty case.

Case tumbling gets your brass nice and clean. But that is not the only way. Then again, I am very careful with my fired cases.

If you wash them in detergent and just let them air dry it takes longer. It is much easier and convenient to use a tumbler. I just never got around to doing so.

One other thing: I use RCBS spray resizing lubricant and when you wipe this stuff off, it has the effect of polishing the cases. My cases are always nice and clean and free of mung.

Mad.
 
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