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I was thinking about all the many modifications/gunsmithing that can be done to increase a rifle's accuracy and it occurred to me that I've never seen a description of which increase a rifles accuracy the most. And I have no idea what the answer is.

So, is bluprinting, is it adding an oversized recoil lug, is it re-crowning the barrel, is it re-tapping the scope mount holes for #8-40 screws, is it...? Etc...

For example, take my next rifle... a Remington 700 Sendero II in .300 Win Mag. It's rumored to be very accurate out of the box. Comes with a nice stock that free floats the barrell. What would be the first, second, third best things to do to improve the out of the box accuracy?
 

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The best thing you can do for accuracy is to carefully and thoroughly burn out the first barrel...


1st) Buy 500 rounds of practice ammunition.
2nd) Fire two rounds and stop. Save the 2 casings.
3rd) Either use your own tooling, or find a friend with .300 dies, and use them to create 2 matching dry-fire rounds. Clean, size, and seat a bullet at mag length. Glue into the primer pocket an eraser off a wooden pencil. Once the glue is dry, use a razor blade to cut the rubber off flush with the head of the case. Finally, drill 3 small holes around the web of the casings and deburr with sandpaper; this is to clearly denote from all angles that these two are DUMMY rounds. Done.

4) Evaluate the trigger as it comes from the factory...possibly consider replacing with A) Arnold Jewell HVR set at 2-3 pounds, or (B) "improved remington" design aftermarket trigger like Timney. Choose option A if this is a rifle that will not see use in freezing conditions, if it will, consider one of the option "B" 2-lever designs.

5) With cleaned-up factory, or aftermarket trigger reinstalled, use said dummy rounds to dry fire 20-50 "live" shots a night, from several shooting positions. Consider doing this in a darkened and quiet room for several weeks until you start to learn the new trigger. Afterwards, put a pushpin or similar size object on the wall about 30 feet away and start using the rifle to "shoot" the pin. NO LIVE AMMUNITION in the room at ANY time.

After a month or so of dry firing seriously, you should be nearing 1,000 "shots" on the rifle, and you'll be getting the hang of the new trigger; also, it's sear surfaces should start to become a little more smooth, and mated to one another.

6) Now, start thinking about going to the range and shooting 1 dry-fire "round" followed by 1 live round for 40 "shots" per session. Do this practice from all positions allowed at your range, and don't start shooting for "groups" or anything silly like that just yet. We're on baby steps with the new rifle still. .300 ammo is not cheap, and barrels don't last long, so we really are trying to keep live fire down to about 20-25% of your practice time.

Try to get to the range once per week minimum for these live fire sessions, and keep dry firing at home all the while. 'Happiness is a worn-out snap cap...' or something along those lines.

7) After 6 months or so of live fire, you'll be nearly out of ammo, and you'll have a good pile of brass saved up, all the same brand and lot...since all the 500 rounds you bought were the same. (hint) Your trigger should be near 7,500 cycles and smooth as silk, the bolt should be gettin' really slick, and barrel will be halfway cooked, but nicely conditioned for you to start learning to reload the cartridge.

8 ) Buy handloading gear, and learn how to use it, and how to listen to what your rifle is telling you in so doing. This is a thread in it's own, or more. Search.

9) After you reload all those cases once, and fire them again, you'll be about 1,000 rounds in, and hopefully near 15,000 total cycles on your action and trigger. You will KNOW the rifle, KNOW the cartridge...and the barrel will be dead--or nearly dead--in your arms. Feel free to cry a little about it, then call Krieger, and your favorite riflesmith and get on their books. If you have the forethought and $$ to do so, get a barrel ordered at about the 500 round mark, when you start reloading...then it will be ready for you to send to your smith when the factory tube dies; and make no mistake, with the .300, it will die...sure as taxes, and as funny as a heart attack, only more quickly than either.

10) At this point, let your riflesmith disassemble and evaluate the action. He/she will almost undoubtedly single-point remachine the threads, face the action, face the bolt, recut the rear lug surfaces, possibly retime extracton cam, possibly bush the firing pin (suggest this if you've had trouble with cratering on your primers), possibly ream the raceway and bush the bolt, possibly install a better extractor like a Sako...the list goes on. Take a look at Greg Tannel's (Gre-Tan) Info pages, and at Mike Roscoe's (Lousiana Precision) Truing Pages to get an idea of what CAN be done with a Remchester.

Replace the mainspring in the action at this point. You're 15,000 cycles and a barrel into the deal...she's tired, and ready for the recycle pile.

Evaluate other stock options, if they might suit your shooting style and purposes better. If needed, have your smith pillar and glass the rifle into a new stock, or do the same on the factory stock.

If the trigger's in good repair...don't mess with a good thing. You should bestest friends by now, so don't screw up a good relationship with fingers in the wrong places.

11) With said trued action, and a now-premium barrel and chamber, resume carefully reloading to learn the new barrel SLOWLY.

Proceed burning out barrels and casings and jugs of powder at will until you decide you're tired of this, or until there are no more elk to kill. Follow something similar to this prescribed routine, and you AND you rifle will be capable of that kind of performance.


It's not about just one "best thing" to make the rifle shoot better. It's about continually pushing up the boundary of performance ALL across the board. It's about you and the rifle's journey together to become a system.

-Nate
 

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natdscott said:
The best thing you can do for accuracy is to carefully and thoroughly burn out the first barrel...
Thank you, Nate!

Do not let that inspired post of yours slip into oblivion. Adam is right: it needs to be stickied.

Now, if you will excuse me, I have a barrel to burn out....

Regards

Davy
 

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Great post Nate. STICKY IT! As for the OP I have found big returns from upgrading the stock, blue printing the action, upgraded recoil lug, and either reworking the trigger or upgrading it all together. However I don't have a quantifiable number for you on the returns in performance of each modification.

MR
 

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A useful tool for dry firing inside and getting some more benefit from it if you live in a small house or apartment like I do, and (though I can look out my Window into a pasture when there is enough light) is called the "indoor optical training aid" a review can be found here

http://8541tactical.com/IOTA_review.php

Fwiw, a member over at snipers hide created an application for your smartphone or computer to help with practicing reticle ranging with this device as well.

Also what nate said.
 

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I am in awe of this post an the experience contained in there. Yikes!!! :shock: Thanks for that. It will help me too even though I do not shoot the OP's cartridge

Not to derail the thread but just a quick Y/N question if possible Nate..... will the .308 cartridge wear barrels out as fast as the .300? I'm guessing not?
 

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There's really some great information here. Some things I already do and some that I will be doing.

That scope cap gizmo looks interesting. It should solve a big dryfire issue I have with my rifle.
 

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The best thing you can do for accuracy is to carefully and thoroughly burn out the first barrel...


1st) Buy 500 rounds of practice ammunition.
2nd) Fire two rounds and stop. Save the 2 casings.
3rd) Either use your own tooling, or find a friend with .300 dies, and use them to create 2 matching dry-fire rounds. Clean, size, and seat a bullet at mag length. Glue into the primer pocket an eraser off a wooden pencil. Once the glue is dry, use a razor blade to cut the rubber off flush with the head of the case. Finally, drill 3 small holes around the web of the casings and deburr with sandpaper; this is to clearly denote from all angles that these two are DUMMY rounds. Done.

4) Evaluate the trigger as it comes from the factory...possibly consider replacing with A) Arnold Jewell HVR set at 2-3 pounds, or (B) "improved remington" design aftermarket trigger like Timney. Choose option A if this is a rifle that will not see use in freezing conditions, if it will, consider one of the option "B" 2-lever designs.

5) With cleaned-up factory, or aftermarket trigger reinstalled, use said dummy rounds to dry fire 20-50 "live" shots a night, from several shooting positions. Consider doing this in a darkened and quiet room for several weeks until you start to learn the new trigger. Afterwards, put a pushpin or similar size object on the wall about 30 feet away and start using the rifle to "shoot" the pin. NO LIVE AMMUNITION in the room at ANY time.

After a month or so of dry firing seriously, you should be nearing 1,000 "shots" on the rifle, and you'll be getting the hang of the new trigger; also, it's sear surfaces should start to become a little more smooth, and mated to one another.

6) Now, start thinking about going to the range and shooting 1 dry-fire "round" followed by 1 live round for 40 "shots" per session. Do this practice from all positions allowed at your range, and don't start shooting for "groups" or anything silly like that just yet. We're on baby steps with the new rifle still. .300 ammo is not cheap, and barrels don't last long, so we really are trying to keep live fire down to about 20-25% of your practice time.

Try to get to the range once per week minimum for these live fire sessions, and keep dry firing at home all the while. 'Happiness is a worn-out snap cap...' or something along those lines.

7) After 6 months or so of live fire, you'll be nearly out of ammo, and you'll have a good pile of brass saved up, all the same brand and lot...since all the 500 rounds you bought were the same. (hint) Your trigger should be near 7,500 cycles and smooth as silk, the bolt should be gettin' really slick, and barrel will be halfway cooked, but nicely conditioned for you to start learning to reload the cartridge.

8 ) Buy handloading gear, and learn how to use it, and how to listen to what your rifle is telling you in so doing. This is a thread in it's own, or more. Search.

9) After you reload all those cases once, and fire them again, you'll be about 1,000 rounds in, and hopefully near 15,000 total cycles on your action and trigger. You will KNOW the rifle, KNOW the cartridge...and the barrel will be dead--or nearly dead--in your arms. Feel free to cry a little about it, then call Krieger, and your favorite riflesmith and get on their books. If you have the forethought and $$ to do so, get a barrel ordered at about the 500 round mark, when you start reloading...then it will be ready for you to send to your smith when the factory tube dies; and make no mistake, with the .300, it will die...sure as taxes, and as funny as a heart attack, only more quickly than either.

10) At this point, let your riflesmith disassemble and evaluate the action. He/she will almost undoubtedly single-point remachine the threads, face the action, face the bolt, recut the rear lug surfaces, possibly retime extracton cam, possibly bush the firing pin (suggest this if you've had trouble with cratering on your primers), possibly ream the raceway and bush the bolt, possibly install a better extractor like a Sako...the list goes on. Take a look at Greg Tannel's (Gre-Tan) Info pages, and at Mike Roscoe's (Lousiana Precision) Truing Pages to get an idea of what CAN be done with a Remchester.

Replace the mainspring in the action at this point. You're 15,000 cycles and a barrel into the deal...she's tired, and ready for the recycle pile.

Evaluate other stock options, if they might suit your shooting style and purposes better. If needed, have your smith pillar and glass the rifle into a new stock, or do the same on the factory stock.

If the trigger's in good repair...don't mess with a good thing. You should bestest friends by now, so don't screw up a good relationship with fingers in the wrong places.

11) With said trued action, and a now-premium barrel and chamber, resume carefully reloading to learn the new barrel SLOWLY.

Proceed burning out barrels and casings and jugs of powder at will until you decide you're tired of this, or until there are no more elk to kill. Follow something similar to this prescribed routine, and you AND you rifle will be capable of that kind of performance.


See what I did here? It's not about just one "best thing" to make the rifle shoot better. It's about continually pushing up the boundary of performance ALL across the board. It's about you and the rifle's journey together to become a system.

-Nate
Brilliant, Bravo, Bravo.

The first thing to be improved is the guy pulling the trigger. Once your form is good, take a serious look at proper gun fit, it seems to be a neglected topic here but is important if Nate-sama's advice is to be most effective. I think that model comes with a good stock. But after you've done everything that Nate-sama has said (BTW: Who has enough money in this world to buy 500 Rounds of quality 300WM ammo (if you figure $45 a box that's over $1100!!!)). After you've improved yourself, I'd look into the stock, bedding, replacing.
 

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Well I was just blown away...

Now I need to buy something for my rifle... pencils!

I'd think more on getting that lense for the optic to dry fire at 10yds indoors, but I live very rural. I do need something to focus on the for the dry fire drills.

The first few shots will be for barrel break in, to get snap cap brass, and get my 100yd Z. No matter how long I want to dry fire, a unzeroed rifle isn't near as much help in a pinch.

Thanks for the write up!
 

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I hate to sticky my own ramblings, but I hate to make people angry more, so it's stuck.

I need to follow my own advice in that...and go home from the office and shoot.

-Nate
 

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Fix the shooter

Revival!!! Read post #2.. This applies to every new guy here..
I'd add one more - which applies to many of us, especially me. Most of us can get better and this is a bigger variable than the rifle, assuming a reasonable setup, IMHO.
 
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