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So you want to paint your rifle. It’s not tough, and once you work up the courage to do one rifle you’ll want to do another, then another, maybe even a buddy’s! In order to achieve the best looking/longest lasting finish on your stick remember this. PREP WORK IS KEY. First off, let’s take care of the supplies.



-Degreaser (Acetone, ect.)
-150 or 220 grit sandpaper
- Template (Grass, leaves, netting, paper)
-A few cans of Krylon
-Light colored rags
-Painters tape (or masking tape)
-Hair dryer

Prep Work
Now we start prepping the rifle. In this first stage, we’re going to prevent paint from entering the inside of the rifle/scope. Get out your masking tape, and tape all surfaces you don’t want to be painted. (Scope turrets, trigger assembly, inside of your action, ect.) If you’re doing the barreled action separate, it’s best to totally remove your trigger assembly. As far as placing tape on your scope lenses, go for it. If my 4x Bushnell lens coating will hold up to it, your $1000 Leupold’s will also. Then again if you have flip ups there’s no need to tape up the lenses. For a barrel plug, I like using a pencil for .22 and .243 barrels. Lightly hammer the [writing] end into the muzzle, and call it good. For larger calibers, get a $.99 dowel from Menards and do the same. Some use earplugs, Styrofoam, ect. They all work well, but I prefer using something wooden. As for the chamber, I like using styrofoam packing. It can easily be punched and shaken out with a cleaning rod.



I suggest lightly sanding all surfaces of the rifle you want painted. Stock, barrel, action, rings, everything. This will help the paint adhere to the surface. Some scopes and parkerizing jobs won’t need to be sanded, being they’re coarse enough to start with. I would sway from sanding the bolt bodies, heck, basically anything internal that the function of the rifle/scope relies on. After your finished sanding all parts of the rifle, wipe all of the excess dust off with one of your rags.

Now, fetch your degreaser and a clean rag. The degreaser will remove the oil that gets on the rifle via your hands. It will also leave the surface completely dry and ready for paint. So once you’re done degreasing, don’t touch the rifle with your bare hands. I would recommend showing your feminine side and using some rubber cleaning gloves to handle the rifle after degreasing. Normal wool/fabric gloves will leave remnants of cloth behind, so I’d sway away from such. Also, don’t use tissues or TP for degreasing. Those will leave behind tiny remnants of paper that will affect the durability and longevity of your finish. Now for the actual degreasing. Take your rag and get it damp with degreaser, and simply wipe down all parts of the rifle and scope that will be painted. When you’re finished degreasing the rifle, don’t let it sit too long before it’s 1st coat because that will allow dust to settle on it.

Now for the base coat. If you’re using multiple colors, remember to always use the lightest color first. I use three colors when I camo my rifles. Desert tan, OD green, and earth brown. These make a great combo for grasslands, forests, and even dry/desert environments. Shake up that rattle can, and go to work. Remember to hold the can 10+ inches from your rifle to prevent dripping. Once you have a good first coat on it’s time to unleash your feminine side once again. Take your hairdryer and use it on the rifle for one to two minutes. This drastically speeds up the curing process, allowing for you to continue with your next coats. For a base color I recommend using two or three coats to help sustain wear. Always thoroughly look the rifle over before its final coat to make sure you haven’t missed any spots.

Now for your “camo coats.â€
 
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Nice, im sure that will help some of the guys here who were a little afraid to take that first step and paint their first rifle.
 

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Great writeup brother, I think that deserves a sticky. :wink:

Rigger
 

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Discussion Starter #6
navyrigger46 said:
Great writeup brother, I think that deserves a sticky.
Cool, thanks.

Oh, and aix, you're right on. :lol:


dom
 

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Thanks for posting this. I read this the other day, and tonight I did the "fish net technique" to my muzzle loader. Wish I had a before pic. It was just all black before. I used Krylon Ultra Flat tan, brown, and green. Mine is a little more random, but I'm happy with the outcome.






 

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particlerealities said:
Hey - nice job! I would have never thought of painting a muzzle loader like that.
Very interesting. I have never seen a camo muzzle loader like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Nice job, looks great!


dom
 

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Hey i just have a question about taking apart the rifle to paint it, it is really need on a bolt action rifle? Or it can be done like in the movie shooter? Since my goal it is to cover every inch of the rifle.
 

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Eric32 said:
Hey i just have a question about taking apart the rifle to paint it, it is really need on a bolt action rifle? Or it can be done like in the movie shooter? Since my goal it is to cover every inch of the rifle.
I did mine as a whole.
I have some not-so-good-quality photos somewhere, I'll try to post them (I guess I'll open a photobucket account).

Edit:
Alright, here we go. The original 700P LTR:


A pair of boots :shock:



Work in progress...


And the results


Of course I had previously put masking tape over all the parts I didn't want to cover with paint. Ho and I gave a brisk shot on my sling too, but not on my Eagle cheek pack! :wink:


A little update:
An here's how she looks now... (plus a TacOps bolt knob)

 

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Wow thanks alot that really helps. What did you use to make sure you didnt get paint inside where the bolt goes?
 

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Eric32 said:
Wow thanks alot that really helps. What did you use to make sure you didnt get paint inside where the bolt goes?
I used some kind of blue, thick scott towel (usually used for mechanic) and rolled it tight and placed it where the bolt goes. It covered everything and looked fine to me, and it did a great job. I put masking tape everywhere else (trigger, bolt release, etc.).
 

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thanks alot thats the only question i had, you have been very helpful ill see if i can post some picture of the rifle after the paint job.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Frzburn's advice is good, tape works fine as well...or toilet paper, or a napkin or tissue.


dom
 

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Easier done than said. after reading this I finally got the nerve to paint more than just a stock. Decided to start with a blackpowder.
 

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Parkerizing question

What are the guidelines for when you should or shouldn't Parkerizing a weapon before painting it? I want to duracoat my ar-15 and my 10fp but I don't know if I should look into Parkerizing them or just move forward with painting them. Does anyone have a good rule of thumb for this?
 

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As far as painting it whole or taking it apart, I took my Savage apart when I shot it with Alumahyde (pics are floating in the gallery somewhere). I'd probably take it apart for the base coat, then put it together if doing a camo job on it.

And I'll add that rather than hammering a pencil into the muzzle, a soft earplug works pretty good. I used the expanding type (they're free, and I had a whole box). I just rolled it up, put half of it in the muzzle, and waited for it to expand. Worked perfect.
 
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