Sniper & Sharpshooter Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Are there any benifits to having a heavy rifle vs a light/lighter rifle when bench rest shooting beside the amount of recoil felt? And what is the best weight range to stay with-in if any?

This may have been discussed before but nothing shows up when i do a search.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
I believe a heavy rifle is easier to shoot at longer ranges then a lighter one but if you know how to shoot well it doesn't really matter. Since you are doing benchrest shooting and not having to lug it around besides the distance from your car to the range I would get the heaviest rifle you can get.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,238 Posts
The heavy rifle helps by reducing felt recoil, while the lighter rifle helps when it comes to hauling a rifle around the boonies.

JeffVN
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,795 Posts
A heavy bbl does not heat up as quickly as a lighter weight bbl. There are some other more technical advantages that people argue about as well. Also a heavy rifle is easier to hold steady. As for max weight, look at the competition and it will give a max weight for each class you are shooting in.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,927 Posts
ekaphoto said:
There are some other more technical advantages that people argue about as well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,927 Posts
ekaphoto said:
There are some other more technical advantages that people argue about as well.
Yup :D

Maybe I overdid it with the stock on my target rifle, but the forearm is flat and 3 1/2 inches wide. The barreled action and stock together weigh in at 12 pounds, approx. With scope, floorplate, trigger, maybe a bipod and a full load of ammo she'll be 16 pounds I figure.

I don't know very many people around here who target shoot, so most of my gun buddies are hunters. They don't really get the weight issues. Some guys think the SKS is too heavy to carry. Some of the stuff I hear...

"That stock is a 2x4"
"Hey, how did you mount the Hubble on that rifle?"
"That thing weighs more than Rosie O"

What I like about the weight is the things everyone else here beat me to saying. It's steady, the recoil is lessened a great deal, and the barrel is slow to heat up. The good thing about recoil being somewhat tamed is that your practice sessions can be longer without being painful. With a 300 WM weighing in at 10 pounds I am good for 25 rounds. After that I ain't worth much. A 15 pound 30-06 will be a pussycat to shoot, and follow up shots will be easier since the jump of recoil won't knock me so far off target.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,795 Posts
StealTh said:
ekaphoto said:
Also a heavy rifle is easier to hold steady.
Easier to hold steady? Really? I havent really shot that heavy of a rifle yet so i wouldnt know :oops:

StealTh
Yea, it is, to a point. In fact some people have special contured bbls for standing that are actually thicker on the muzzel end than the middle to help them hold steader. The reason is there are weight restrictions on their class and a muzzel end heavy tends to hold steady. Like I said this is true to a point. A 50 lb rifle held by a 90lb woman is going a bit far, so you have to fugure what works for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
Yeah some how it keeps it more steadier. Plus I love humping it with me on a sling or in my arms. I just have a crazy obsession with heavy rifles etc. Like my paintball set up, that is heavy, it makes me pay more attention and be aware of whats going on. Weird, but hey I work that way.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,927 Posts
Holding a heavy rifle steady is something I always looked at as a blade that cuts both ways. The fact that the rifle weighs a lot means it is physically harder to shake, and it absorbs your movement just like it absorbs the recoil. The problem is that your muscles fatigue a lot more rapidly than with a light rifle. Shake less, tire quicker, then shake more. If a long range rifle is the goal though, there really isn't much call to be shooting it unsupported.

I never competed with a muzzle heavy rifle, but they sure do balance and swing nice when you track a moving target with them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
I think it totally depends on what you are going to be doing as to wether a heavy rifle is better or not. You aren't going to want to go elk hunting with me on burnt mountain with a 12 or 15 pound rifle in your hands...sure you'll make a longer shot but most shots on that particular hill are 200 or less yards... if you're going to be out in Elbe or Ea. Wa on stand watching hillsides 400-500 yards away for deer...that 12 or 15 pound rifle might come in handy. that's the hunting point of view for ya...now for you tac. guys...you know what's best i'll keep my nose outta that one! As for bench shooting...heavier is better if you've got that puppy rested up on a bipod and socks but if you've gotta muscle that thing onto target that might get slightly heavy after a half hour or so at the range...that's my input...

-Brian Shields
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,927 Posts
Thanks Stealth, that and what Brian and everyone esle said pretty much covers it.

I would call "average" between 7-9 pounds. "Mountain" or "featherweight" rifles less than that, and "heavy" 10+

I think my Garand is 9 and a half, which is leaning towards heavy, but back in the day, 11 weeks of PT with the rifle must have helped a lot :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Iam getting a Remmy 700 SPS soon, and its 7 1/2 pounds without a scope (looking at putting a Rifleman 3-9x40 on it...anyone know the weight?) so id bet it would get around 8 1/2 pounds or something, then later on i could mount a harris bi-pod on it, how much do those cost?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
stealth...sounds like you are getting the EXACT set up i'm looking at buying here in the next month or so...I'm getting a VXII 3-9x rather than the rifleman though...harris bipods i've seen for 45 bucks on sale at sportco...i'm not sure what the reg. price is on them.

-Brian Shields
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
sportco is an outdoor/sporting goods outfitter here in Washington State. Not sure if they have other branches elsewhere or not. I believe that the bipod can attach to the swivel studs...one of our Remi's actually has a sling attachment on the bi pod so you go rifle to bipod, bipod to sling...if that makes sense.

-Brian Shields
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,795 Posts
M-60 ie the pig 26 @#$#%^#% pounds without ammo!
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top