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Hello all,

It seems that most major optics manufacturers have their own selesction of rimfire riflescopes. I was just wondering what the major difference is between a rimfire riflescope and a regular riflescope. Does this mean you cannot use a regular riflescope with a rimfire rifle?

Sorry for my ignorance and thanks for your help.
 

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I'm no expert, but they seem to be cheaper quality. A rimfire does not create much recoil, so the rimfire scope can be constructed with less quality. You could mount expensive sights on a rimfire, but mounting a rimfire scope on a hi-power rifle would punish the scope pretty good. Again, I may be wrong, but I would think this is the difference. Most "rimfire" scopes I have seen are something I would use on a plinking .22 or for hunting small game.
 

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Most regular non parallex adjustable Leupold scopes have a fixed parallex set to 100m where as thier fixed rimfire scopes have a set 60m parallex. Even this is too much for some shooters. In competive small bore target shooting 25m and 50m targets are used so many competitors use EFR scopes which are parallex adjustable down to 10m. The VX-11 3-9X33 rimfire EFR is a good example.

 

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In addition to the facts offered by my SniperCentral brethren, rimfire scopes (especially the economy models) also typically have dramatically shorter eye relief that might cause injury to the shooter if mounted on a weapon with recoil.
 

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I use a simmons pro hunter 4-12 X 40 on my ruger 10/22. Its got an adjustable objective for close up shooting, it was under $90, and I expect it will last forever there and not even break a sweat.
 
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