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And that, ladies and gentleman, is the straight truth.

It can be done if a person has a lot of knowledge, patience, good measuring tools (micrometer and ideally, a 0.0005" dial indicator and stand), a good assortment of shim stock and sandpaper, a lapping bar, and some epoxy. Even then, the closest you should expect to get is within a few MOA, and that is PLENTY close enough.

It was not worth it to me, when I can just get a scope with more adequate elevation if needed.

-Nate
And even when you get it all "leveled for elevation" a change in ammo puts that work all for naught:(:(
 

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I've been reading some of these posts concerning squared up scopes and canted rifles and I'm wondering if any of you guys have actually done any shooting. The cross hairs of the scope MUST be square to the bore if you want your scope to track true from 100 to 1000yds or beyond, period. The rifle MUST be held level when firing it at long range. You do what you have to do to make sure it is level, or don't pull the trigger and waste a bullet. Cant your rifle at close range, not a big deal, you move POI only a inch or two. Cant it at 500 or beyond and you missed the target. A slight cant at 1000yds will take you from the X ring to the 9 ring with a .308. The more drop your bullet has the more effect a cant has. This applies to both iron sights and scoped rifles. It's easy to hold level off a rest or bipod, you must hold back against the tendency to cant when shooting prone with a sling. It may not feel comfortable but so what. What's more important comfort or hitting your target. Practice keeping the gun level and you will be able to keep it level. Sure a adjustable butt plate helps but not every rifle has one, a M1A for example. Verify the rifle is level before you pull the trigger. Its not that hard. There are a ton of variables going against you hitting the target, wind, slope, spin drift, Coriolis effect, etc, so why would you allow one more by having a canted rifle?
 

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Look at my signature lines...yeah, I've shot some. 6-8" groups at 600 yards, and 50% or better of those in about 4" depending on the day....shot canted about 1/2 the time, because it depends on my mood, and I can do both, just to make guys like you cringe.

Since you are in Highpower in Illinois, I'm sure we know each other, but when you say things like this, on a brand new forum:

I've been reading some of these posts concerning squared up scopes and canted rifles and I'm wondering if any of you guys have actually done any shooting.
It makes me say things like this: Piss off, mate.

You might as well introduce yourself by name.

-Nate
 

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Look at my signature lines...yeah, I've shot some. 6-8" groups at 600 yards, and 50% or better of those in about 4" depending on the day....shot canted about 1/2 the time, because it depends on my mood, and I can do both, just to make guys like you cringe.

Since you are in Highpower in Illinois, I'm sure we know each other, but when you say things like this, on a brand new forum:



It makes me say things like this: Piss off, mate.

You might as well introduce yourself by name.

-Nate
I was sitting and waiting for you to chime in. You didn't let me down. Only 16 minutes. I figured less than 30.

I watch a record holding shooter "cant the crap" out of his rifle when he's practicing on Tuesdays. He just rolls it over so his sights are right in front of his Right eye while his head and neck are "straight up".

Read about Bud Solis here on Berger's website. He's at my club range every Tuesday AM when not traveling to matches.

http://www.bergerbullets.com/information/success-stories/target/p6/
 

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I mean, dude could be friggin Mark or Bob Delcotto for all I know (though I would expect more decorum from them). It's not that I know everything, or that my accomplishments are really that great, or that if I shot in Illinois that I would be able to win anything (almost assuredly not)...

...it's the approach. I don't appreciate it, internet or not, and nobody else that had contributed to this thread should either.

-Nate
 

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I've been reading some of these posts concerning squared up scopes and canted rifles and I'm wondering if any of you guys have actually done any shooting. The cross hairs of the scope MUST be square to the bore if you want your scope to track true from 100 to 1000yds or beyond, period. The rifle MUST be held level when firing it at long range. You do what you have to do to make sure it is level, or don't pull the trigger and waste a bullet. Cant your rifle at close range, not a big deal, you move POI only a inch or two. Cant it at 500 or beyond and you missed the target. A slight cant at 1000yds will take you from the X ring to the 9 ring with a .308. The more drop your bullet has the more effect a cant has. This applies to both iron sights and scoped rifles. It's easy to hold level off a rest or bipod, you must hold back against the tendency to cant when shooting prone with a sling. It may not feel comfortable but so what. What's more important comfort or hitting your target. Practice keeping the gun level and you will be able to keep it level. Sure a adjustable butt plate helps but not every rifle has one, a M1A for example. Verify the rifle is level before you pull the trigger. Its not that hard. There are a ton of variables going against you hitting the target, wind, slope, spin drift, Coriolis effect, etc, so why would you allow one more by having a canted rifle?
What Club do you shoot in Illinois?
 

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I just followed Ryan Cleckner's video Set up your Scope for Success on my first ever scope install, and had the scope properly mounted for me and leveled in about 15 minutes, and it didn't cost me a penny.
Went to the range and the rifle/scope zero'd to 100 yards in 5 shoots. I then went and shoot to 2,3,4,5 and 600 yards first time using Mil adjustments from my ballistics chart for rifle and ammo.
As others have mentioned in earlier posts (See video at 8:33 mark) I just used a piece of metal between the scope base and the rail and your done! I can't imagine how you could get a more level mount by reading one or two bubble levels. If you don't have a level scope base, then you get to choose which of the previous methods works for you.

youtube.com/watch?v=COoXVpGfXQE

I am no expert this was my 1st precision rifle build, 1st scope mount, 1st time shooting past 200 yards, 1st time hitting steel out to 600 yards and I'm hooked! My only other rifle build was an AR-15.
 

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After everyone gets their scopes "leveled" then the next task is to go to the range and shoot the "Tall Target".

Simple test. Just as it says, put up a Tall Target at 100 yards. It should have a vertical line extending from near the bottom to the top and make sure it's "plumb" using a weighted piece of string or a carpenter's level. At the bottom put a 1" target dot with cross hairs which you will use for the aim point for all testing.

Shoot and zero at the aim point. Then adjust elevation up 2-3 increments (the big marks, not the little ones that match the "clicks"). Shoot a couple or three shots then go up another few increments.

The end result will be a series of groups that are supposed to follow the vertical line from bottom to top. If you want to take a short cut, put several vertical lines on the target, zero on the aim point then run your elevation turret up 12" or so. Using the same aimpoint as when you zeroed, fire a 3 shot group and note whether it's centered on the lone or if it's off to one side. If to the Left, your scope is tracking to the left. If on the right, your scope is tracking right.

Loosen caps, adjust scope slightly in the right direction, re-torque cap screws and repeat on the next line.

You might be amazed at how much tracking error you could have even if you spent hours with the finest levels in your initial setup. It all depends on how the innards track, not how level the scope is.


Remember, always use the single aim point at the bottom of the vertical line and it's a good idea to align the vertical reticle with the vertical target line as well.


This may not be necessary for shorter ranges but when you go beyond 500-600 yards you will see the effects.
 
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