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I'm sure that somebody will correct me if they feel that I am wrong, so let um rip!

I have been under the impression that 99% of most modern weapons are not susceptible to the problems of dry firing as were weapons produced 25 plus years ago.

Example: Several professional shooters spend as much time behind their firearms dry firing them as they do live firing.

My Sig 516 which has approximately 7k down the pipe has at least 1k of practice trigger discipline. My 338LM which has about 2k of rounds through it has at least 500 trigger dry fires. My Sig MPX on the other hand, I will not dry fire. MPX's are known very well for chewing through firing pins.... and, it is a modern weapon. I have two extra firing pins on hand for the MPX, and also a few different spares from a few different manufacturers for my AR15's and AR10's.

Being in many precision shooting instruction classes, our field time usually consisted on an hour or so of dry firing while instructors monitored our technique. In the military as far back as when I served, we routinely dry fired everything from our bolt guns, autos, and handguns.

I'm not sure of your weapons involved, but do some research and see what the consensus of the manufacturers and professionals have to say.

One of my previous instructors claimed to have dry fired weapons since 1978, several hundreds of thousand of times when I asked the same question in the early 2,000's. I really didn't believe his "count", but I did my research.
 

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When I was young pulling a trigger on an empty chamber would earn me a thump on the head. We had some fine old rifles and shotguns. I was taught to hold down the trigger while slowly lowering the bolt on bolt guns and had home made snap caps (as mentioned above by patkelly4370) for shotguns. Older guns would have to have firing pins made, which was and still is expensive. I still have and shoot one of those fine old rifles.
I was told that snapping the older guns set up vibrations, think tuning fork, that work hardened the older metals causing them to get brittle and prone to breakage.
I believe modern metals (as stated above by Ken M) aren't prone to breakage and a new pin could be acquired with a phone cal, some competitive shooters stock spares.
I have been reading about several modern rimfire guns that break pins by the pin striking the mouth of the chamber. Dry wall anchors (the yellow ones) are recommended as snap caps for dry fire practice and in my experience work well as a 22lr snap cap.
 

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My Sig 516 which has approximately 7k down the pipe has at least 1k of practice trigger discipline. My 338LM which has about 2k of rounds through it has at least 500 trigger dry fires. My Sig MPX on the other hand, I will not dry fire. MPX's are known very well for chewing through firing pins.... and, it is a modern weapon. I have two extra firing pins on hand for the MPX, and also a few different spares from a few different manufacturers for my AR15's and AR10's.

Being in many precision shooting instruction classes, our field time usually consisted on an hour or so of dry firing while instructors monitored our technique. In the military as far back as when I served, we routinely dry fired everything from our bolt guns, autos, and handguns.
 
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