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Skimming through this great info, I may have overlooked this, but is there a good rule of thumb for error when seating the bullet? What I mean in I am loading flat head, hollow metal jacket bullet in my .45acp. The Speer manual calls for a COL of 1.200" I have had some at 1.20x and some 1.19x (x = 1 to 9). I saw that reloading undersized cartridges can be dangerous. Well how much is too much in both directions?

Another question I have is I bought a set of used dies from the local gun smith (they were his personal set). Its a 3 piece RCBS. On of them have the primer punch out pin, but also expands the neck of the cartridge. The second one has the bullet press in it and it appears to also crimp the neck down onto the bullet. However the third die (which I have yet to use) is hollow and the diameter of the cartridge. Im not sure whats its used for.
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Okay, I'm running 124 grain Hornady XTP's in 9mm, the Hornady manual lists an OAL of 1.060, and a max load of 4.8 grains of Unique. I'm seating to 1.070 and at 4.6 grains it seems like the powder is taking up a lot of room in the case. At 1.070 the bullet is compressing the charge about 1/16". so my question is this, how in the world do you cram 5.8 grains into that case, and why does Hornady list such low max loads?

Rigger
 

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Hello again!

I've upgraded my bench, replacing my Lee Challenger press with a Lee Classic Cast. What a monster! If you want to start loading rifle cartridges and do not have a single stage press yet, get this. It is better than the Rockchucker by all accounts. Read the reviews at Midway.

Then, for pistol and .223, I got a Lee Classic Turret Press. I turned out terrific rifle ammo on the Challenger, but I'm doing better work on the Classic Cast. Here's the new bench. . .



I stand by my earlier posts stating Lee gear is the best to learn on if you do not have equipment to start. I am replacing my Lee scale (it works fine, and is repeatable based on my check weights), simply because there are better systems for old eyes to use than their slider poise. But I have enjoyed using it. Lee simple presses and dies are awesome. I probably would get the Hornady LNL over the Lee Loadmaster if I wanted to go progressive (especially with 1000 Hornady premium bullets thrown in on their current promotion), but the Lee Classi Cast and Lee Classic Turret Press are all I need, and may be as far as I go on presses. I don't shoot enough to need a true progressive.

Thanks to all the teachers in this forum! And to Mel for the whole shooting match!
And here's some Berry's 185 gr. Plated Flat Points I loaded on the Turret Press. I'm currently working on duplicating the Hornady Custom factory load in 200 gr. XTP at 900 fps on the turret.

 

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Crimping Question!

I have read a lot about crimping lately. I have seen statements that say do not crimp unless the bullet has a crimp ring. They say you can distort the bullet.

If you crimp a bullet that doesn't have a crimp ring, are you really accomplishing anything?

Would love to hear some feedback on this. Both on the rifle side and on the pistol side. From what I understand, the recoil on a .308 shouldn't be enough to move a bullet that has the proper neck tension.

I know that pistol recoil is more abrupt. Do I definitely need to crimp on a 40 s&w. If so, why don't they put a crimp ring on all 40 caliber rounds.

Let me know what you guys think.

And thanks for all the great info in this thread!
Just started reloading a few months ago. Started with my 308, now moving to my 40 s&w. Really appreciate the time mad put into this thread.
 

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There are two types of crimp, a roll crimp and a taper crimp. A roll crimp, as the name implies, bends or rolls over the case mouth slightly into a crimp groove, called a cannelure, impressed into the bullet or bullet jacket. You should not do this with any bullet without a crimp ring.

A taper crimp, on the other hand, just uses a die with a very shallow internal angle polished into it to gradually force the case walls against the bullet, but it does this flat. . .without rolling over the edge. I hope my words are creating an adequate picture in your mind for you.

You bell the mouth of a case to seat the bullet in a pistol round. A taper crimp will close this case mouth belling so the round will feed. Most pistol bullet seating dies will do this taper crimp at the same time, and you should follow the die instructions on adjusting for this. Alternatively, you can use a separate crimping die, like the Lee Factory Crimp Die and do this in a separate step if you prefer. I do it this way. Be careful with the sleeve in the Lee FCD, however, it is tapered only on one end and if you put it in the die backwards, it will mangle your case.

I use my caliper to crimp my .45 rounds to a diameter of 0.469", although some use 0.471" or only 0.470". You want to be very gentle with this and be careful not to roll the case mouth over , not because you don't have a roll crimp in your bullet, but because the case headspaces on the case mouth.

Carefully taper crimping with no crimp groove is fine.
 

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Great Info, thanks.

Thanks for the tips. I can see the picture in my mind from your description. Well described, thank you again.
 

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Not gonna lie, the other day i left the range after happily shooting my pistol, and buddies AR, and four rounds through my deer rifle. I promptly picked up the 30-06 Brass to reload.

While doing so i noticed the mayhem me and my friend made, there were about 180 5.56 casings on the ground, and about equally as many 9mm.

At the time i didn't think much about it. I suggest that we should pick up the 5.56 for a buddy considering he probably reloads it. But we did not do it.


Then, after depleting my ammo for my 9mm i went to the store to pick up another 100rnd box of Winchester 9mm. When i first bought my XDM i bought one of these boxes for $24ish. And a box of 50 was $16. When i went that Sunday so i had something to put in my defense weapon i noticed the price was now $36 for the 100, and exactly half for the 50.

Ever since then that pile of empty brass at our range has been eating at my brain.

Next time i go out shooting i will definitely pick it up, though i am short on money, and cannot afford dies, bullets, powders, or primers right now (For my now pistol reloading interest, or for my Rifle interest [I have about 50 rounds of 30-06 just waiting for primers, bullets, and powder]) Because it is getting ridiculous. That and quality JHP's are hard to find around. Pamida carries some Remington UMC hollow points that work well but they are about as much as a 100 rounds of FMJ's.


Learn from me gents!


~Rhyno~
 

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Rhyno430 said:
Next time i go out shooting i will definitely pick it up, though i am short on money, and cannot afford dies, bullets, powders, or primers right now (For my now pistol reloading interest, or for my Rifle interest [I have about 50 rounds of 30-06 just waiting for primers, bullets, and powder]) Because it is getting ridiculous. That and quality JHP's are hard to find around. Pamida carries some Remington UMC hollow points that work well but they are about as much as a 100 rounds of FMJ's.

~Rhyno~
Pick up all the brass that is orphaned. Sort the stuff you don't use into its own bags and when the caliber gets to 100 throw the brass on gunbroker being shipped for $8 in one of those USPS $8 shipping boxes and you will find it will sell from $10-$25, or more, depending on the caliber. The $ isn't huge but it buys you brass that you shoot. I have been collecting brass but I shoot at a private range so I never find the huge hauls. I was able to put together a pack of 60ish .308's and 40ish .45's and traded them for a 100 6.5x55's. It was a win for me and cost me nothing.
 
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