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I recently acquired my CZ Scorpion Evo carbine, and had the intent to camouflage paint it. From a tactical standpoint, any precision engagement of a target would need to be camouflaged due to the range limitations of a PCC being used for target interdiction.

The problem is, it already looks pretty awesome in its standard black configuration, and now that I'm ready to break out the Krylon cans, I find myself hesitating to do anything to that slick black surface. After all, the first rule of any spec ops outfit is to look cool, and I'm no longer sure whether the carbine will look cooler painted or left alone.

For any of you who have experience with this sort of thing/are familiar with the CZ, what are your thoughts?
 

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If concealment and cost are your primary considerations, then paint away. It comes off easy enough and therefore won't affect the value. A spray down with carb or brake cleaner and most of it will wipe off.

If cool is your consideration, and you are willing to put more money into it, one of the coatings like cerakote or duracoat, in a solid color or a camo pattern.

There is also the hydro dip coatings as well.
 

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Painting will void some Rifle Scope Warranties. Just read that provision in Tangent Theta owner's manual the other night. Not painting that baby anyway but you might want to look at your scope's warranty before you start spraying away. Just my .02.
 

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Cerakote done properly will increase the value of your firearms. Krylon will always decrease the value. Cerakote done by someone that doesn't know what they are doing will also decrease the value of a firearm.

Good camo cerakote is not easy and takes experience to get right. The more intricate the camo pattern, the more difficult it is to do, but also the better it looks. Simple splotches of color will be practical and effective, but will look like garbage and will decrease the value of your gun. If you want a practical camo pattern that looks good, then you will need someone experienced to do it for you.

BTW-- $500 will not even begin to purchase the equipment necessary to do a quality cerakote job. A quality paint gun will run about $300 alone and that doesn't even include the sand blaster, compressor, oven, paint, acetone, paint booth, and other small parts. A cheap paint gun will spit and clog (as he said) and often ruin a paint job. Doesn't take too many of those until you will be ready to buy an Iwata. As far as air compressors go, a cheap compressor will be fine as long as you are willing to wait on it. The problem is moisture in the air. You will need some way to dry the air. A simple in line "moisture grabber" helps, but doesn't completely remove the moisture. You either need an air dryer, or several feet of steel pipe. With plastic pipe or air hose, the moisture is in the air and doesn't have time to condensate and therefore won't be pulled out by the "moisture grabber". With steel pipe the moisture will condensate in the line and be easily removed by the "moisture grabber". I don't think I need to tell you that moisture mixed with your paint will not yield a quality cerakote job.

As far as the oven goes, it is difficult to find an oven that is large enough to fit rifles in, therefore in most cases it must be built. Building an oven with proper insulation is not cheap, but the temperature control is the more difficult part. You will really need a PID in order to control the temp precisely and even then you need a very sensitive "K" sensor to keep the temp from slingshot over the set temp. It doesn't take many degrees over the set temp to ruin the cerakote...or even worse the plastic gun parts.

Stencils are another difficult thing for do-it-yourself people. You can buy stencils, but that gets expensive and you are limited to what you can find already cut. Even then, if you make a mistake in laying out the stencil or you don't buy enough stencils, you have to start over and buy more stencils. A vinyl cutter will run more than the $500 budget above and a quality cutter will be 2-3x's the budget.

Then there is paint. If you just buy the 4oz testers and you buy 3 colors for a simple camo pattern you will be out about $120 just in cerakote...and with a 1 year shelf life you might only spray one or two guns before the paint isn't good anymore.

So...long story short-- should you paint your gun? Absolutely not.

Should you have your gun professionally coated with cerakote by someone that knows what they are doing? Absolutely! It will look good and increase the value.

However...seeing as the OP posted about 18 months ago, I assume he has finished his project and is no longer in need of this advice. However I will leave this advice here for anyone else who might find it useful.
 
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