Sniper & Sharpshooter Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
New guy here with a question. I've been shooting for about 7 years (with firearms, about 20 years with air rifles) and in that time I've been using the same guns - a Sako .22" Finfire Varmint (the heavy barrel one) and a Marlin .44" underlever (with hand-loads). I've recently bought a Steyr-Mannlicher Pro-Hunter in .308 with synthetic stock and as it's my first new rifle in about 5 years, it's made me realise something which is where my question comes from.

I know that in good shooting practice, there should be a gentle, progressive squeeze of the trigger and the shot, when it comes, should be a surprise. This is fine with my new rifle (I've only shot about 40 rounds with it so far and all at a 100yd target range), but because I've been shooting so much with the same rifles before, the shot is not a surprise - I know exactly where the breaking point is on the Sake and Marlin. I know the pull pressure needed, so even though I know the guns well, I find myself starting to anticipate the shots. This isn't such a problem on the .22 as recoil is less than some break-barrel air rifles, but with some of the heavy .44 loads on as light a gun as the Marlin (I'm using open iron sights), I'm finding that anticipation off-putting. It's fine on the Steyr as the trigger is still pretty new to me (I've not adjusted it in any way).

Any advice on anticipating shots on rifles you know very well? Do you just try and forget that you know it's going to break when it does?

Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,559 Posts
Hi TGV... and welcome to the Sniper Central forums!!!

You could get Snap Caps and practice dry fireing. "A-Zoom" Snap Caps are the best that i know of. They allow you to safly practice dry firing without damaging the firing pin and/or the face of the bolt.

BC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,276 Posts
re

Not answering you question sorry, but where do you shoot TGV? Bisley?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,894 Posts
As BC said, snap caps help with flinching and is a good place to start.

That being said, it is a common misconception that the shot should come as a surprise. This isn't quite accurate. While you do NOT want to be flinching or moving in anticipation of the recoil, you ALSO do want to know when the round is going to go off... in our particular line of work, we MUST be the ones who dictate when the shot will go off. With practice, you will get to the point of knowning when the shot will go off, and dictating it, all without any unwanted movement caused by anticipation.

Another good way to work through this would be to grab a shooting partner, take him/her to the range, and while you are being the bench or in the prone, have your partner chamber the rifle and place it in front of you. Either with a round, or without (the idea is for YOU not to know). Then go through the procedures of firing (a round my go off, or may not). This is a good exercise as many flaws are exposed when there is no round in the chamber.

MEL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,559 Posts
You deffinitly dont want to be like "WOW... OOPS i didnt mean for it to go off"...

A good exercise (very very similar to what Mel posted) is to intermix your magazine with empty casings with used primers but with bullets in the casing... and live ammo... (you can go the extra yard and use new primer cups but remove the stuff inside the primer that makes it go boom) that way you cant tell one rounds from another... unless you feel it by weight... so have a friend load the magazine... NOT THE CHAMBER... and then go at it. You will probably be flinching for the first few hours at the range (if you stay there that long)... but you will get it down and it helps alot.

BC
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,927 Posts
The idea Mel suggested works great. (BC's will too but I never tried that one)

My dad fixed my flinch that way with a 30-30 when I was a lad....Was a little embarrassing how much I flinched the first time the rifle went "click" but you get to see it, and then get used to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,559 Posts
The exercise i noted i picked up in DM school... the Sniper would sit next to me while i was in the prone position with an M-14 DMR.... he would intermix live ammo randomly with dummy rounds into the 20 round magazine... he would then hand me the magazine and i would load the magazine into the mag well... then i would get in my shooting position NOT LOADING THE RIFLE... the Sniper sitting next to me is suppose to pull back the oprod and load it for me... then he gives permision to fire on target 1... "shooter 1 target 1..... fire... BOOM"... the semi auto rifle would automatically reload the next round... then the sniper would mark bullet placement ect ect into the class session log book... and say "shooter one target 2.... fire... CLICK"... it might be a dummy round it might be a live one the shooter has no way of knowing... the shooter keeps the shooting position while the sniper manually pulls back the oprod and extracts / ejects / cocks / strips / chambers and locks the next round into the chamber... "shooter 1 target 3.... fire.... BOOM".... it might be a dummy round it might be a live round... the shooter has no way of knowing.

This method gets the shooter use to controling himself when about to fire... it works very well. Any other questions just let me know.

BC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the suggestions. I can have a go at all those ideas. There's a gun shop only about 10 miles from me that sells those snap caps so that's worth a try.

Yimmy - I have shot at Bisley (and have 2 trophies to show for it - nothing major, but I'm proud of them!), but my usual range is one in the middle of nowhere - the club leases the ranges (100yd, 50yd and 25yd gallery) from the farmer whose land it's on.

mele - interesting point about the anticipation actually and one that makes me re-think again. With the 2 guns I've had for a few years, I've got to the point where I can anticipate the shot and I thought this might be a bad thing, but from what you say, with a little discipline I can use this to my advantage. It's good on my .22 which I can now take 10 shots at 50yds leaning on a bench with no other support and they're all grouped together cutting an irregularly shaped hole. I have to give the Sako some credit too - it's a fantastic rifle.

Maybe I'm being too impatient with the Steyr? As I said, I've only taken it to the range twice and only shot 1 brand of ammo in it. I'll start handloading .308 soon.

I like the idea of mixing live rounds with dummy rounds though - I'll ask one of the guys to mix them up in the magazine and I'll take it from there.

Glad I found this forum now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,337 Posts
i always thought if the gun suprised you when it went off it was probably a neglent discharge..... what we always got told. it should fire when you want it to
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,129 Posts
Tell that to the second round you fire through a .338 Lapua without a brake.

-snowy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
The reason you want the "suprise", is because you are squeezing the trigger until it goes off. If you are just pulling the trigger and knowing when it fires, you tend to pull the rifle off of point of aim. When it suprises you, you are so intent on your sight picture and trigger control, that the round going off kinda shocks you. Or something like that. :)
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top