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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Trijicon AccuPower 4-16x50 MOA, PART 1


The Trijicon AccuPower series has been out for some months, yet the internet so far has remained largely oblivious to the new offering. Succumbing to curiosity and a general lack of comprehensive information, I bought the "long-range" model of the series, the 4-16x50, and decided to provide a review to the benefit of the internet. Hello, internet. Wakey wakey.

IMG_2926.JPG


The AccuPower 4-16x50 is not the most obvious choice for a long range shooter, in-fact it's downright unappealing for most. Most aspiring snipers like the idea of dialing in, even if they rarely shoot at ranges which justify this busy-work. This scope will not cater to those sensibilities in the least. Additionally, this is a $900 scope that lacks a FFP reticle, which few companies, including Nightforce (which charges much-much more) can successfully explain to consumers. This AccuPower scope is stamped as "Made in Japan". I will assume this is a syntax problem and that actual assembly of the Japanese fabricated parts happens in the good-ole US-of-A. However if we can ignore these sins, there are a few specific qualities and features that should be pointed out:

-Trijicon Ruggedness (I assume, this is TBD PART 2)
-Excellent optical clarity and light gathering
-Good magnification range for precision at 308 distances
-Matching MOA/MOA Adjustments and reticle
-40 MOA of combined elevation hold-over in the reticle
-20 MOA center illumination speeds up the thin reticle when needed
-Reticle remains equally visible at all powers
-4-factor magnification makes for easy SFP math.
-Multi-intensity illumination with intermediate "off" setting, excellent
-Several low-light/ NV settings included in that
-Finger-adjustable windage and elevation w/ tool-less zero reset

IMG_2955.JPG

Why would you buy one?

One word. Simplicity. As an internet shopper, you may have noticed that it is emotionally VERY hard to buy a Trijicon scope for distance work. What makes it hard is the commitment. For most of Trijicon's optics you have to do some serious soul searching to determine what is most important about the way YOU shoot, and the intended PURPOSE of the scope. These aren't the feel-good do-it-all scopes that many of us start out looking for. We want value. That must mean more features, right? Nope. Not with Trijicon. For 99% of Tricon's offerings you are committing to ONE solution for connecting a shooter with the target. Trijicon will give you a reasonable option of WHICH solution. But you have to pick ONE and commit. Of course, for those of us who refuse to compromise at all there's always TARS.

If you buy the 4-16x50 MOA, you are committing to MOA-ranging and holdovers with a 40 MOA elevation cap. It's going to be 30 MOA for those among us who refuse to hold-under. This will mean a hold-over maximum range between 830 and 970 yards. You won't break a grand unless you are comfortable zeroing the highest point of the reticle at max PBR. It must be said that for field work this is a reasonable expectation, and will deliver you very fast results if you can wrap your head around a 430+ yard zero. Let's put it this way: if you buy this scope for distance work, JBM ucards will be your best friend.

You may be curious why I didn't buy the AccuPoint 5-20x50. That was MY hard decision. In the end, it was more important to have precise ranging capability built-in and reticle-matched adjustments. Had Trijicon offered the 5-20x50 design in the AccuPower lineup with the MOA reticle it would have been a no-brainer, and worth the likely $1200 MFG price.

First Impressions

Why aren't there BETTER photos of this thing? ANYWHERE?
The scope comes in an attractive box, ensconced in the usual block of foam as one would expect from Trijicon; with a manual, product summary, sticker, lens cloth, and battery. Technically, yes indeed the scope has lens caps. Those awful fly-by-night operation clear/amber caps that do little more than contribute irony to the overall packaging. These are just packaging. Chuckle sarcastically and discard them.

The scope itself is very well machined. In most internet photos details of the articulated caps get reduced to archaic blobs. Even my photos don't really to them justice. But the attention to detail is apparent in-person. The power ring fox tail is well integrated into the design. The reostat is low and snag-free with a coin-slot type battery cap. Use a penny. The truly unique aspect of the scope is the ultra-matte finish, which is almost velvety in texture. Despite these fine attributes, step back and the scope is otherwise completely unremarkable. This is not an attention-grabber. And guess what? That's perfect. Aesthetics are completely unimportant to what it is: minimal, stealthy.

From Back to Front

IMG_2948.JPG
The ocular adjustment is the fast-adjustment style... Let me rephrase: It is the hyper-drive adjustment style. It is possibly the fastest adjustment from + to - I have ever seen. The entire range is traversed in a little over one turn. To help you keep track, a white indicator is clearly visible on the ocular for verifying your personal setting. This is both a nice feature and absolutely critical given the speed at which the ocular can be accidentally misadjusted. Operation is firm, smooth and instantaneous.

IMG_2929.JPG
The illumination rheostat provides 11 brightness settings with intermediate "off" positions. Again, operation is firm and the knob is machined aggressively for grip.The tactile rheostat clicks are almost enviable for use in target turrets. Almost. There is no such thing as "0" since "off" is every other option on the dial. The numerical font here and elsewhere on the scope is simple and highly legible. No tacti-cool lettering here.The battery cover is tightly fitted to the knob, with a coin slot for switching out the battery. The battery is gripped very securely at the edges by conductive petal springs and is pressed downward with a hefty coil spring under the cap.

The magnification ring is machined with grooves for grip around the entire circumference and with an integral cat tail. The tail's rotational travel is almost exactly 3 oclock (16x) to exactly 9 oclock (4x) and at exactly 12 oclock, you have (8x). For SFP, that's important to know, especially considering that the power settings are not visible from behind the scope. Operation is very firm, but smooth. It will stay where you put it. Depending on your use, the inability to see the power from behind the scope might be a deal breaker. In my case, if I have time for precision I will go straight to 16x. If I'm dealing with a close mover then I will have slammed it back to 4x. There's really no messing around in-between at this power range, and in SFP that practice is a liability. I would consider the AccuPoint 5-20x50 to be at a disadvantage in this regard. There, I would want to see the power setting from the shooting position. And for that power range it really needs to be FFP.

IMG_2928.JPG
The adjuster covers are machined similarly to the power selector. The covers are low-profile and come tightly fastened. One interesting feature (vestigial, perhaps from R&D) is the circumference groove near the top of each cap which is more typical of lanyard-captured caps. No lanyard is provided. And having wrestle lanyards in the past I can't say I miss having one. The covers, once loosened are quick to remove and spin tight again with a snap of the fingers. The threading is a noticeably coarser and deeper profile than what might be seen on a hunting scope, facilitating confident handling and tightening. No searching for tiny, shallow threads here.

Cont in next post....
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
IMG_2935.JPG
The adjuster knobs located under the caps are actually a cut above the norm at first glance. A single rotation of 18 MOA is represented on the dial (a bit awkward for doing the math, 20 would have been nice) with a grooved upper edge for grip. Pulling sharply on the knob (tck!) disengages it and it rotates loosely to allow re-zeroing. Pushing down re-engages it (snap!) with no mushiness or play. The collar under the adjustment knob uses a single white line to indicate the index point. There are no vertical travel hash marks, which would have been appreciated for value-added functionality. The knob adjustment increments are 1/4 MOA, not 1/4 IPHY (halelujah!) and the clicks are unexpectedly precise and crisp with very good resistance, perhaps the perfect amount for this size of knob. But the most surprising aspect of the scope is the fact that the adjusters are plastic. Yes, plastic. Now, I know this is a new age of materials science and I'm supposed to be open-minded, but plastic ANYTHING just doesn't cut the mustard on a $900 scope. Especially a scope MFG-listed at $999. Perhaps Trijicon considers coinless operation a win no matter how it is achieved. But this simply reinforces what I said previously about Trijicon scopes. You are committing to ONE solution. You won't be removing caps and fiddling with the adjusters in the field. You won't dare leave the adjusters exposed. That's not the deal. You will cap those suckers, man-up and hold-over as God intended.

{Recall old photos of 90's era snipers who had removed their Leupold Ultra scope caps and the exposed metal knobs inside had subsequently been abused and rubbed to bare metal. This won't happen here. You might just destroy the knobs. So leave the caps on. Alternately, Kenton Industries will be providing custom and BDC knobs for this model. Let's hope they're metal. To be fair, the plastic being used here is unknown, and there are plastics out there which will exceed any expectation for ruggedness in this application. Let's call my gripe inconclusive until we get an idea of what this material is.}

The adjusters are very good from a tactile-feedback perspective. For an "adjuster" the feedback excels. If these were exposed target turrets the feedback would be OK but a bit too easy to turn. My final criticism speaks to the shared characteristic of all plastic knobs: they simply can't be made to align with the index line. The elevation knob on this scope is off by 1/16 MOA and the windage knob is off a full 1/8 MOA. Is this relevant to the real-time operation of the scope? Not really. Is it annoying? Yes.

Moving on...

IMG_2932.JPG
The focus knob is machined similarly and is also quite firm to manipulate. Each of the controls on the scope cause a bit of discomfort to handle, which I don't mind because the main point is holding the chosen setting and keeping a low profile. The focus knob is marked all the way down to 10 yards, impressively. Then up the scale to 300 yards, then infinity. There is zero play in the mechanism. The focus knob is noticeably shorter than the adjuster covers. This focus knob cap is the sole location of an understated Trijicon logo.

The objective is 50mm but doesn't appear over-sized aesthetically. Due to proportions, some scopes are visually dwarfed by their 50mm lens, but this scope isn't among them. At the front of the scope, the one slight disappointment is the complete lack of structural melodrama around the objective lens. I was expecting a hardy exterior lens mounting ring, torque-fitted with an air wrench, placed there to convince me that THIS is one tough scope. No, not really. The assembly around the objective is fairly normal looking, nothing like what might be seen in a Nightforce or USO. Both of those companies have done well to overbuild their scopes in very prominent ways. Tactical shooters like that. Like the rest of the Trijicon scope, the objective is very balanced toward simplicity and efficiency. It measures just shy of 50mm, so all of the light you might expect from an objective of that size is getting into the optic.

Looking through the optic at home, the clarity is very very good. It far exceeds the performance of the Bushnell HDMR (obviously) I owned previously and compares as superior against the SWFA SS I shot for several years. Those of you familiar with both the SWFA SS glass and high-end optics will appreciate that sentiment. Comparing Trijicon against a Swarovski, I'm philistine-enough to see no difference. There is a fair amount of "pop" in this scope. The most ardent fidelity nazi or photog might be pacified. I'll mark it up to Japanese glass.

IMG_2939.JPG
The reticle is the selling point of this Trijicon scope over others. The MOA style reticle is available in much of the AccuPower line, though in slightly varying configurations. The 16x version of the reticle comes in 2 MOA increments and provides 10+30 MOA of vertical hold-over. The center 20 MOA of elevation and windage is illuminated, in either green or red. Not both. More on that later. Trijicon provides a comprehensive set of dimensions for all of their reticles, so those shooters studious enough to fully employ the design will have the benefit of accurate information. Now 2 MOA are the actual subtensions. 1 MOA is easily held between those markings, and with a little calm handling 1/2 MOA is perfectly doable. With the previously mentioned dimensional reticle information employed, a careful shooter may be able to hold off 1/4 MOA with reasonable consistency.

The reticle illumination is extremely well executed. All 11 brightness levels produce very little bloom, and even at the highest setting in the darkest room all of the details of the center portion (though blinding) are clearly read. The center reticle steps forward fairly readily in dark conditions against mottled scenery, presenting the center portion which apparently floats by itself in the center of FOV. With my previously suggested zero values, the illuminated portion, by itself, will get you out to 600+ yards (assuming you can see that far). Now, back to the red vs green question. Red is the classic "terminator" color scheme, and green is widely felt to be more visible in most applications. I concur. However, since Trijicon, again, provides us a strict choice of EITHER red or green, one would assume that the lens coatings are subsequently formulated to mask forward emission of one color or the other. Nope. Pretty much all but the lowest illumination settings are visible at the front of the scope. And even in the lowest setting, in complete darkness it will present SOME emission. The vulnerability comes from the apparent edge of the reticle plane which seems to be lit nearly twice as bright as the reticle itself, so an imperfect alignment between you and the target would permit observation. Having said that, I would consider the first two to three detents "safe" for engagement in dimly lit situations. Under no circumstances over-illuminate the reticle in a night-time tactical exercise. Even if an observer is positioned 90 degrees from your POA, this scope also will light up your face with the efficiency of a welder's arc. The flip-side to that immense top-end power is that it is also usably visible during broad daylight.

IMG_2941.JPG
Ok, so all of this talk is nice, but what does this scope actually do in practice? How consistent is it? How rugged? Is it actually rugged? It doesn't look that special. Do the holdovers actually work that well? All of these questions I plan to address in PART 2, because as of this moment I have no idea.

As a tease you can youtube Sage Tactical (some other dude, not me) and observe his scope drop test. I will also formulate a ruggedness test of sorts, but being mounted on my 1/3 MOA rifle any discrepancies following a drop or tumble should clearly present themselves. I felt STs AR-10 groups left a lot of ambiguity to the question.

The goal is to flip the rifle end-on-end for 100 yards and shoot a group no more that 1MOA offset from the group shot before the tumble. Think it's doable? We'll see.
 

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Anybody else seen one of these? I have narrowed my budget sfp scope hunt to the Trijicon and the Sightron S Tac 2.5-17.5. I would love more feedback.
 

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Hello, I just received the same scope but with Square Mil-Dot Square in Green. I must say I have to agree with Banshee8 as the packing of the product was extremely nice. Scope is looks really well made and very straight forward. I upgraded to this scope from a Nikon Prostaff 7 and anxious to mount it tonight and take it to the range on Saturday.
Looking forward to part 2 of your review Banshee8
 

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Had an accupoint mounted on a hunting rifle. Brother in law knocked it off a table, hit a chair and landed on a carpeted floor. From the chair, about 18 inches to the floor. Looking at it, it didn't look damaged. Further look and the tube was slightly bent on the ocular side. Sent it to Trijicon and they said it could not be fixed. Scope was less than a year old. That was it. Offered me a discount coupon for a new scope. Yes, it was my fault but I've had hunting rifles fall in situations much worse that that and come up scuffed but damaged to the point it "couldn't be fixed".
Thats been my experience with Trijicon. Quite different than other scope manufacturers.
 

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Well I mounted the Trijicon last night and will say it again "Totally Impressed"! I cant wait to zero in. It will have to wait a bit as I am having my bolt fluted and cerakoted.
 

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Good to hear. I like a lot about this scope. Wish there were more glowing reviews of CS like you hear with Vortex and Sightron.
 

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Hello Guys, I wanted to give you a quick update on the scope. I went out this weekend to zero in the scope at 100 yds. The Scope was clear and crisp! The visibility was great! My first two shots landed low almost off the target but at 6 o'clock right down the middle. Adjustments were very easy and after 4-5 shots was hitting ring 10 on my target. Very impressed. Locked and Zero'd the turrets and will go out this weekend again to further tweak. I shoot a Remington 700 VTR pretty much stock. I just ordered a Bell and Carlson stock A2, Badger ordnance M5 Trigger Guard, Timney Trigger 510 set at 2.5 lbs, and a better bipod as the one that comes with the rifle is horrible!! I went with the stock upgrade as every time I shot I would see the rifle raise up and towards the right off bipod. Also the bipod after gorilla tightening it would become loose after a couple shots. I plan to have everything installed by end of week so I can try it out on the range on Sat.

Cheers,
Henry
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
All, I have failed you terribly. In a moment of clarity/ weakness I made a massive system trade. I am now shooting a Springfield M1A National Match in a Troy MCS SASS Chassis. I'm running a Burris MTAC 4.5-14x42 on a Armalite mount. Dueck offset irons are the supplemental sights. I caught the semi-auto bug for this cartridge. Won't return to bolts unless I go for a bigger bang.

Suffice to say, I can't give you a field review of the Trijicon scope as I had planned to do.

However, if there is any interest, let me say that the Burris 4.5-14x42 MTAC by all appearances is a solid, solid, tactical offering, particularly for semis. I can provide a similar breakdown of this $400-$600 optic if I get requests. Similar to the Trijicon, there is not enough "press" on this piece. Burris has piqued my interest.
 

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I'm very tempted to buy this scope. Either this or the Leopold Mark 4

View attachment 7167
The adjuster knobs located under the caps are actually a cut above the norm at first glance. A single rotation of 18 MOA is represented on the dial (a bit awkward for doing the math, 20 would have been nice) with a grooved upper edge for grip. Pulling sharply on the knob (tck!) disengages it and it rotates loosely to allow re-zeroing. Pushing down re-engages it (snap!) with no mushiness or play. The collar under the adjustment knob uses a single white line to indicate the index point. There are no vertical travel hash marks, which would have been appreciated for value-added functionality. The knob adjustment increments are 1/4 MOA, not 1/4 IPHY (halelujah!) and the clicks are unexpectedly precise and crisp with very good resistance, perhaps the perfect amount for this size of knob. But the most surprising aspect of the scope is the fact that the adjusters are plastic. Yes, plastic. Now, I know this is a new age of materials science and I'm supposed to be open-minded, but plastic ANYTHING just doesn't cut the mustard on a $900 scope. Especially a scope MFG-listed at $999. Perhaps Trijicon considers coinless operation a win no matter how it is achieved. But this simply reinforces what I said previously about Trijicon scopes. You are committing to ONE solution. You won't be removing caps and fiddling with the adjusters in the field. You won't dare leave the adjusters exposed. That's not the deal. You will cap those suckers, man-up and hold-over as God intended.

{Recall old photos of 90's era snipers who had removed their Leupold Ultra scope caps and the exposed metal knobs inside had subsequently been abused and rubbed to bare metal. This won't happen here. You might just destroy the knobs. So leave the caps on. Alternately, Kenton Industries will be providing custom and BDC knobs for this model. Let's hope they're metal. To be fair, the plastic being used here is unknown, and there are plastics out there which will exceed any expectation for ruggedness in this application. Let's call my gripe inconclusive until we get an idea of what this material is.}

The adjusters are very good from a tactile-feedback perspective. For an "adjuster" the feedback excels. If these were exposed target turrets the feedback would be OK but a bit too easy to turn. My final criticism speaks to the shared characteristic of all plastic knobs: they simply can't be made to align with the index line. The elevation knob on this scope is off by 1/16 MOA and the windage knob is off a full 1/8 MOA. Is this relevant to the real-time operation of the scope? Not really. Is it annoying? Yes.

Moving on...

View attachment 7168
The focus knob is machined similarly and is also quite firm to manipulate. Each of the controls on the scope cause a bit of discomfort to handle, which I don't mind because the main point is holding the chosen setting and keeping a low profile. The focus knob is marked all the way down to 10 yards, impressively. Then up the scale to 300 yards, then infinity. There is zero play in the mechanism. The focus knob is noticeably shorter than the adjuster covers. This focus knob cap is the sole location of an understated Trijicon logo.

The objective is 50mm but doesn't appear over-sized aesthetically. Due to proportions, some scopes are visually dwarfed by their 50mm lens, but this scope isn't among them. At the front of the scope, the one slight disappointment is the complete lack of structural melodrama around the objective lens. I was expecting a hardy exterior lens mounting ring, torque-fitted with an air wrench, placed there to convince me that THIS is one tough scope. No, not really. The assembly around the objective is fairly normal looking, nothing like what might be seen in a Nightforce or USO. Both of those companies have done well to overbuild their scopes in very prominent ways. Tactical shooters like that. Like the rest of the Trijicon scope, the objective is very balanced toward simplicity and efficiency. It measures just shy of 50mm, so all of the light you might expect from an objective of that size is getting into the optic.

Looking through the optic at home, the clarity is very very good. It far exceeds the performance of the Bushnell HDMR (obviously) I owned previously and compares as superior against the SWFA SS I shot for several years. Those of you familiar with both the SWFA SS glass and high-end optics will appreciate that sentiment. Comparing Trijicon against a Swarovski, I'm philistine-enough to see no difference. There is a fair amount of "pop" in this scope. The most ardent fidelity nazi or photog might be pacified. I'll mark it up to Japanese glass.

View attachment 7170
The reticle is the selling point of this Trijicon scope over others. The MOA style reticle is available in much of the AccuPower line, though in slightly varying configurations. The 16x version of the reticle comes in 2 MOA increments and provides 10+30 MOA of vertical hold-over. The center 20 MOA of elevation and windage is illuminated, in either green or red. Not both. More on that later. Trijicon provides a comprehensive set of dimensions for all of their reticles, so those shooters studious enough to fully employ the design will have the benefit of accurate information. Now 2 MOA are the actual subtensions. 1 MOA is easily held between those markings, and with a little calm handling 1/2 MOA is perfectly doable. With the previously mentioned dimensional reticle information employed, a careful shooter may be able to hold off 1/4 MOA with reasonable consistency.

The reticle illumination is extremely well executed. All 11 brightness levels produce very little bloom, and even at the highest setting in the darkest room all of the details of the center portion (though blinding) are clearly read. The center reticle steps forward fairly readily in dark conditions against mottled scenery, presenting the center portion which apparently floats by itself in the center of FOV. With my previously suggested zero values, the illuminated portion, by itself, will get you out to 600+ yards (assuming you can see that far). Now, back to the red vs green question. Red is the classic "terminator" color scheme, and green is widely felt to be more visible in most applications. I concur. However, since Trijicon, again, provides us a strict choice of EITHER red or green, one would assume that the lens coatings are subsequently formulated to mask forward emission of one color or the other. Nope. Pretty much all but the lowest illumination settings are visible at the front of the scope. And even in the lowest setting, in complete darkness it will present SOME emission. The vulnerability comes from the apparent edge of the reticle plane which seems to be lit nearly twice as bright as the reticle itself, so an imperfect alignment between you and the target would permit observation. Having said that, I would consider the first two to three detents "safe" for engagement in dimly lit situations. Under no circumstances over-illuminate the reticle in a night-time tactical exercise. Even if an observer is positioned 90 degrees from your POA, this scope also will light up your face with the efficiency of a welder's arc. The flip-side to that immense top-end power is that it is also usably visible during broad daylight.

View attachment 7171
Ok, so all of this talk is nice, but what does this scope actually do in practice? How consistent is it? How rugged? Is it actually rugged? It doesn't look that special. Do the holdovers actually work that well? All of these questions I plan to address in PART 2, because as of this moment I have no idea.

As a tease you can youtube Sage Tactical (some other dude, not me) and observe his scope drop test. I will also formulate a ruggedness test of sorts, but being mounted on my 1/3 MOA rifle any discrepancies following a drop or tumble should clearly present themselves. I felt STs AR-10 groups left a lot of ambiguity to the question.

The goal is to flip the rifle end-on-end for 100 yards and shoot a group no more that 1MOA offset from the group shot before the tumble. Think it's doable? We'll see.
I'm really interested in buying this scope. Either this one or the Leopold Mark 4. Plan on mounting it on a Sig 716 Patrol
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I'm really interested in buying this scope. Either this one or the Leopold Mark 4. Plan on mounting it on a Sig 716 Patrol
I would recommend going Leupold.

Consider this: The Accupower is a 2nd or third tier offering from Trijicon, contracted out with a Japanese maker. The Mark 4 is a tier 1 product from Leupold, simply of an older design but American made with an epic track record. The Leupold is not a compromise product.

Also, know that Leupold will phase out the old Mark 4 designs this year, so get'em while they're hot.

For the 716 Patrol, I would recommend getting a Mark 4, Illuminated, TMR, with M3 knobs. 3.5-10x range.
 

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I have 2 trijicon accupowers , A 2x10x56 with moa reticle and a 4x16x50 reticle . I really like them I got sighted in pretty easy with both I also used trijicon rings. the glass is bright and clear I done some testing on paper and it appears the 2 moa marks are on the money . I would of liked to seen better material on the turrets but I keep them capped any way so its no big deal for me. the illumination works pretty good I have been out to 300 yds so far and all is good maybe this fall when my buddy gets the crops out of his field I can give it a try for a bit more yardage . I would be happy to answer any specific questions the best I can .

 

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Excellent Scope !!! Well Worth The Money

Hello, I just received the same scope but with Square Mil-Dot Square in Green. I must say I have to agree with Banshee8 as the packing of the product was extremely nice. Scope is looks really well made and very straight forward. I upgraded to this scope from a Nikon Prostaff 7 and anxious to mount it tonight and take it to the range on Saturday.
Looking forward to part 2 of your review Banshee8
I just bought the same scope, can't wait to mount it on my rifle as well
Mounting mine on a Sig Sauer 716 Patrol FDE IMG_2006.JPG fullsizeoutput_53f.jpeg View attachment 11665
 

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Thank You Banshee8,
I do plan on getting the Leupold Mark 4 either a LR/T or a ER/T and mounting it on my Remington 700 BDL Varmint Special 24'' Heavy Barrel
Chambered in a 7mm-08 round. That Rifle is in mint condition and is one of my favorites. Right now it has a Bushnell scope, I like it, it is nice,
But I would rather have the Leupold mounted on top. I have a friend who lives up in New Hampshire and would like to do some hunting sometime.
 

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